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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #11  
Old 02-26-2012
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I have a question. Its been said a few times to stow the dingy on the deck when off shore. Why wouldn't you cover it and tow it behind you? I assume there is a reason?

Brad
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  #12  
Old 02-27-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billyruffn View Post
.. In rough conditions -- Stow it!...
That's a very good advise. Let me add that many that say that Davits are dangerous sail happily with the tender on the bow, that is one of the two places you can store a dinghy on a 36ft or smaller boat, if you don't have davits.

Having it on the bow is probably as dangerous or more than having it on davits. If you have a problem on the front sail or need to change for a storm sail the dinghy makes it dangerous to go and stay forward working.

The other place is back on the stern, firmly attached to it. I found it better and more safe that way. Waves are not a problem but in my boat it obstructed partially the back navigation light and I found out that over 40K wind the windage is so big that it can seriously compromise the ability to control the boat: With that wind a light modern boat is sailing with less sail area than the one that is provided by the flat dinghy on the back and the problems are obvious.

So, as Billy have said, unless you are sure of having tame conditions, stow it while you sail. A easily roll up dingy is a must on a small boat and the new ones with inflated floor are a very good idea.

Regards

Paulo
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Old 02-27-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KIVALO View Post
I have a question. Its been said a few times to stow the dingy on the deck when off shore. Why wouldn't you cover it and tow it behind you? I assume there is a reason?

Brad
s/v KIVALO
Yes, if you take out the engine and oars it will be not a problem in not very bad weather but it slow you down and with bad weather the fixation points can break. The cover will not prevent the boat to capsize (with the wind) and that will slow you down even more and put more strain on the fixation points.

The last time I have done that on a small passage, last year between Minorca and Maiorca the wind suddenly gust over 40K (about 25 sustained) and the dinghy just take off like a kite on the back of the boat, finishing upside down.

We had it on the end of a long cable so it was just funny but the strain on the attachment points could have broken and will broke if we do that too many times

Regards

Paulo
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Old 02-27-2012
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The advantage of coastal cruising is being able to pick your weather and duck in somewhere if it turns on you. We keep ours on the davits all summer. For a long passage would we turn her over on the foredeck.

She sits about 6 or 7 ft above the waterline. Conditions that cold put water in her are not all that treacherous and it happened once. A following wave just crested and probably put 20 or 30 gallons of water inside, which drained out slowly. That was roughly an additional 200 pounds and it didn't seem like much inside. She held, but it got my attention. A real pooping and there is no way. I would estimate the dink could hold 100 gallon of water or more. Maybe as much as an addition 1,000 lbs. Goner in that scenario.

I'm not sure about a cover. It would be a good idea, if you could be sure it would remain tented under extreme pressure. Otherwise, if it was pressed into the raft, it would hold the water like a bowl and prevent it from draining.
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Old 02-27-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
Having it on the bow is probably as dangerous or more than having it on davits. If you have a problem on the front sail or need to change for a storm sail the dinghy makes it dangerous to go and stay forward working.
I think that varies from boat to boat. I carry my Caribe L9 upside down between the mast and inner forestay. The storm staysail is hanked on and bagged atop the dinghy. The dinghy provides a great step and seat for working at the mast. There is still plenty of room to move past it on both sides. When I do have to work on the bow the dinghy proves to be great to wedge against.
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Old 02-27-2012
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I've looked aft to see my dinghy in tow spinning in the wind and throwing the floor board slats away. Light weight on robust davits continues as my choice for my kind of cruising. If I had a smaller boat; then, I would favor the dinghy packed and folded away or nesting pieces on deck. Take care and joy, Aythya crew
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Just had a thought. With an RIB, I suppose you could fashion attachment points underneath the hull and hang it inverted. Probably more trouble than it's worth.
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Old 02-27-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Just had a thought. With an RIB, I suppose you could fashion attachment points underneath the hull and hang it inverted. Probably more trouble than it's worth.
My thoughts exactly. I don't have davits, nor do I sail off shore.

However, IF I did, I would hang the inflatable upside down and rig a simple way to invert it (invert itself?) as it's lowered.

I can think of a couple simple solutions but it would depend on the davits, dink and boat.
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Old 02-27-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KIVALO View Post
I have a question. Its been said a few times to stow the dingy on the deck when off shore. Why wouldn't you cover it and tow it behind you? I assume there is a reason?

Brad
s/v KIVALO
Several people have mentioned that towing a dinghy in high winds will probably result in towing a dinghy upside down and/or flying around at the end of the tow line. But thereís another reason you probably donít want to do it:

Bad weather offshore creates stress on skipper and crew. You begin to worry about stuff going wrong....things breaking, etc. Because the bad weather stays with you for a while, the stress doesnít go away -- it can be with you for days. Now, imagine what a dinghy flying about and plowing itís inverted bow into every other wave will do to your already stressed brain. Itís just another worry and, unlike some of the imagined stressors, itís very visible and constantly following you -- you canít stop looking back to see whatís happening..... you get the picture. Youíre going to want to do something about it -- but you canít because once youíre in that situation all you can do is live with it or cut it loose. You you realize you canít fix the problem, you begin to think, ďHow could I have been so dumb to have that dinghy back there in conditions like this?Ē The self-doubt also adds to the stress.

In bad weather the towed dinghy is a problem you donít need AND, unlike other problems you may face during the ordeal of a storm at sea, you can do something about it. Stow it! before things get bad -- which, practically speaking, means stowing it before you leave.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
Yes, if you take out the engine and oars it will be not a problem in not very bad weather but it slow you down and with bad weather the fixation points can break. The cover will not prevent the boat to capsize (with the wind) and that will slow you down even more and put more strain on the fixation points.

The last time I have done that on a small passage, last year between Minorca and Maiorca the wind suddenly gust over 40K (about 25 sustained) and the dinghy just take off like a kite on the back of the boat, finishing upside down.

We had it on the end of a long cable so it was just funny but the strain on the attachment points could have broken and will broke if we do that too many times

Regards

Paulo
Quote:
Originally Posted by billyruffn View Post
Several people have mentioned that towing a dinghy in high winds will probably result in towing a dinghy upside down and/or flying around at the end of the tow line. But thereís another reason you probably donít want to do it:

Bad weather offshore creates stress on skipper and crew. You begin to worry about stuff going wrong....things breaking, etc. Because the bad weather stays with you for a while, the stress doesnít go away -- it can be with you for days. Now, imagine what a dinghy flying about and plowing itís inverted bow into every other wave will do to your already stressed brain. Itís just another worry and, unlike some of the imagined stressors, itís very visible and constantly following you -- you canít stop looking back to see whatís happening..... you get the picture. Youíre going to want to do something about it -- but you canít because once youíre in that situation all you can do is live with it or cut it loose. You you realize you canít fix the problem, you begin to think, ďHow could I have been so dumb to have that dinghy back there in conditions like this?Ē The self-doubt also adds to the stress.

In bad weather the towed dinghy is a problem you donít need AND, unlike other problems you may face during the ordeal of a storm at sea, you can do something about it. Stow it! before things get bad -- which, practically speaking, means stowing it before you leave.

Thanks for the response gentlemen. One more question. What about towing it using one of the various systems for rigidly attaching the dingy to the stern of the boat? It wouldn't clutter the deck and wouldn't be blown around.

Brad
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