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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


View Poll Results: You're about to dock stern to with mooring lines. 20 crosswind. How do you aproach?
From the windward side of your berth with the bow into the wind 11 30.56%
Straight 0 0%
From the leeward side of your berth with the stern into the wind 25 69.44%
Voters: 36. You may not vote on this poll

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  #11  
Old 05-11-2012
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Re: Docking stern in, strong crosswind

Leaving a line or two hanging off the pilings makes getting connected much easier.
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Old 05-11-2012
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Re: Docking stern in, strong crosswind

I'd back in from leeward, leaving the turn late and using the 'upwind' momentum of the bow to counteract the tendency for it to blow off.. Requires quick action to secure once stopped, though.

If you go in from windward you're swinging the bow downwind already in the turn, and the wind will exaggerate and increase the bow's blowing off downwind... IMO...

We had a cross-wind slip for 20+ years in an area where it blew 20 or better every nice day.. something to get used to.
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Old 05-11-2012
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Re: Docking stern in, strong crosswind

Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster View Post
..............If you go in from windward you're swinging the bow downwind already in the turn, and the wind will exaggerate and increase the bow's blowing off downwind... IMO............
This can be true unless, when you place your quarter at the outside windward piling, you warp around the piling with a line to the bow and stern. This gives you absolute control of the rate at which your bow turns off the wind once you have partially entered the slip. I would repeat, though, that this strategy does not work if the adjacent boats extend beyond the end pilings of the slips.
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Old 05-12-2012
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Re: Docking stern in, strong crosswind

I have to do this very often.

Without warping in the approach is more dependent on propwalk than anything. That said you will be blowing down. There is no time to line up and back in. You have to align the boat on the fly, balancing the dynamics of windage and drift with rotation. Frankly I usually work to get the stern of the boat and the back ten feet or so stuffed in and then rotate from there with bursts of forward and after thrust, prop walk, and rudder. I can almost always get the boat centered in the slip that way without warps although sometimes rotating on a piling.

Warps make it easier but single-handed warps aren't generally going to happen unless you have everything set up ahead of time. Even then it can be rough.
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Re: Docking stern in, strong crosswind

Quote:
Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
..........Warps make it easier but single-handed warps aren't generally going to happen unless you have everything set up ahead of time. Even then it can be rough.
Still more information missing from this poorly proposed question. Are you single handed? Are there no extending vessels blocking your ability to warp on the piling? Is the slip in a location with the wind opposing or favoring your prop walk? Are you on a fin keeled or full keeled vessel?,-Huge difference! I see why conditions would favor the A or C answer.
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Old 05-18-2012
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Re: Docking stern in, strong crosswind

I usually go with approach C from leeward. I agree with the comments that it is hard to control how fast the bow falls off when you approach from windward. The trick to avoid the prop walk issue is to get up a head of steam, and then put the engine in neutral. Now I can steer easily in reverse. When I need to kill speed, a little shot of forward thrust (being careful to know where my rudder is as I can move the stern of my Nordic 44 quickly with a little forward thrust.)
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Old 05-19-2012
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Re: Docking stern in, strong crosswind

Stupid question. Probably one of the misleader questions designed so that no one gets a perfect score. These kinds of "tests" really suck. It depends on the boat. Boats back down differently, captains do things differently. Current, gusts, "mooring lines"???????
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Old 06-04-2012
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Re: Docking stern in, strong crosswind

Well, I would tend to go w/ "C" for all the reasons mentioned, mostly that the bow will want to blow downwind. Get some speed up, shift into to minimize propwalk and steer it into the slip.
THAT SAID.... it depends. On my boat I have a left hand prop. Thinking about the prevailing wind if I were to approach the slip from Windward and back down towards the slip, the prop walk will pull me to starboard slightly and swing the stern into the slip. Approaching from leeward I'd be fighting both the propwalk AND the bow wanting to blow downwind. Would be much harder to make the turn.

I think I would stick w/ C though b/c things will happen slower than in A.
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Old 06-19-2012
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Re: Docking stern in, strong crosswind

Once you've completed the exam and it's scored it would be interesting to know what the "correct" answer might be and the explanation as to why.
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Re: Docking stern in, strong crosswind

Quote:
Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
I have to do this very often.

Without warping in the approach is more dependent on propwalk than anything. That said you will be blowing down. There is no time to line up and back in. You have to align the boat on the fly, balancing the dynamics of windage and drift with rotation. Frankly I usually work to get the stern of the boat and the back ten feet or so stuffed in and then rotate from there with bursts of forward and after thrust, prop walk, and rudder. I can almost always get the boat centered in the slip that way without warps although sometimes rotating on a piling.

Warps make it easier but single-handed warps aren't generally going to happen unless you have everything set up ahead of time. Even then it can be rough.
Thanks for explaining the last bit, i was wondering since I'm singlehanding at least 75% of the time.

I'm lucky to be the last slip at the end by the "T" dock, so if the wind is that tough across, blowing me away from the long T dock into my neighboring slip, I can usually just tie up on the outside of the T and either walk the boat around the corner with 2 lines and pivot into my slip around my port bow piling, or if it's blowing hard, can have someone else (if they're there) do that while I steer around with some motor help -- and they have the lines to keep me from blowing downwind away from the T dock side.

This is a big logistical issue for me single handing and makes getting out of the slip (and in) the toughest part of sailing when the wind's 15+ from the SW (still trying to come up with the best arrangement of lines and cheek blocks on stanchion bases so I can singlehandedly keep the bow pulled into the dock/crosswind while trying to steer/drive the boat out of the slip.

Jon
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