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  #121  
Old 08-03-2012
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

With 6 nuts/bolts holding the anchor together, it appears to me that an oversized Mantus kept unassembled in a storage locker would be the ideal storm anchor (assuming it lives up to expectations on setting/holding). Unassembled, a big anchor could be made compact for storage, and a socket wrench would make quick work in assembling it when needed. After storm passes, retreive anchor, disassemble it and store it below until needed again. Anyone see a problem in this strategy?
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  #122  
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

How about just two bolts...which only have to be loosened and the nuts can remain on the bolts.

Below is an image a 33 lb Rocna side-by-side with a 32 lb. Fortress FX-55.
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  #123  
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

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Originally Posted by NCC320 View Post
With 6 nuts/bolts holding the anchor together, it appears to me that an oversized Mantus kept unassembled in a storage locker would be the ideal storm anchor (assuming it lives up to expectations on setting/holding). Unassembled, a big anchor could be made compact for storage, and a socket wrench would make quick work in assembling it when needed. After storm passes, retreive anchor, disassemble it and store it below until needed again. Anyone see a problem in this strategy?
I think it's a great feature of the Mantus anchor ( also Fortress and Spade).Spare anchors (and you need at least one spare) are difficult to stow unless they can be taken appart.
However you really never know when bad weather is going to hit and anchoring with a "storm" anchor as a rountene is good advice.
Still I would not mind a Fortress FX125 or a big Mantus tucked away in the bilge.
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  #124  
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

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Originally Posted by BrianFortress View Post
How about just two bolts...which only have to be loosened and the nuts can remain on the bolts.

Below is an image a 33 lb Rocna side-by-side with a 32 lb. Fortress FX-55.
Brian,

I didn't mean to imply that your product couldn't be the storm anchor also. A FX-55 shows in WM at $679. That's strong for some budgets. Since you brought it up, I have to confess that I don't understand why WM Traditional or Danforth Hi Tensile anchor of same size (not same weight...weight adds little to the holding power, but size does) is always rated grossly inferior to an aluminum Fortress in holding power. I understand that having machined edges enhance the digging in of the anchor, but something doesn't seem right. Also, the Fortress flukes seem to be held just on the edges on one side and with some aluminum straps on the outside edges. That just doesn't seem as strong as welded construction of the other Danforth variants. I know about many of the tests that were run a few years ago, but to me, the results just don't make sense. (Also, didn't understand why the Bruce knockoff didn't do better in those test either.....lots of people in my area depend on either the Bruce or the Danforth variants...including a fair number of Fortress.) Can you enlighten the doubters on the above issues?

The Mantus and Rocna make a different presentation to the ground and I can see where they might have different results.

Last edited by NCC320; 08-03-2012 at 08:03 PM.
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  #125  
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

NCC320,

Thanks for your post. We have been in business now for 25 years, during which we have manufactured our product at the exact same facility in Fort Lauderdale, Florida....and being that Fortress anchors are made from an aluminum-alloy, there are still ongoing concerns as to their strength and performance, and we always welcome the opportunity to address those concerns.

The Danforth anchor, particularly the Deepset II and Hi-Tensile versions, are excellent products and they have enjoyed a loyal following among boaters for decades. This anchor type is certainly one of the most copied throughout the world.

Fortress anchors are obviously "Danforth fluke-type anchors", but the key difference is that they are precision-machined from aluminum-alloy extrusions, the result of which is a much sharper anchor that is better able to penetrate a sea bottom faster and deeper than a heavier, dull-edged steel version.

The sharper Fortress ike a razor slicing through a surface and thus is capable of burying very deeply into a sea bottom, and with the massive surface area of its two flukes, a Fortress is difficult to pull out once it does.

And that is the "secret", if there is one, to the Fortress anchor's legendary holding power performance, in which it has held to over 300x its weight in anchor tests. Examples would be the Miami test, in which a 65 lb Fortress held to 20,000 lbs until the rope broke, and then in a more recent French test, where a 7.1 kg Fortress held to over 2,500 kg.

"Real world" test examples would include when a 22 lb Fortress FX-37 held a 42 ft Silverton in 140+ knot winds during Hurricane Andrew (pictured below with lady holding it).

Additionally, Fortress anchors are tapered and thickened at critical stress points to ensure that they are able to disperse and handle loads more efficiently. Proof of this was evidenced by the extensive US Navy anchor tests that were conducted years ago.

All of the steel Danforth Hi-Tensile anchors were completely destroyed in this test, and there was some surprise to this result, as it was noted in the report that the high grade of steel used in the Danforth anchors was much stronger than the aluminum alloy used by Fortress, which was cause for this analysis in the final US Navy test report summary:

"The fact that the Fortress anchors incurred no significant structural damage at such high holding ratios suggests that the anchors have been extensively engineered from both the hydrodynamic and structural standpoints."

Finally, the stock (narrow round rod) is grooved and the flukes snugly fit into this groove, and the metal clips (you called the "straps' ) simply hold the flukes in place on the stock. Once the bolts on the clips are tightened, all of the anchor parts are secure.

I have attached other images and I hope this information is helpful!

Safe anchoring,
Brian Sheehan

Fortress Marine Anchors
Attached Thumbnails
Let's talk about anchors some more-fx-37-side.jpg   Let's talk about anchors some more-fortress_horizontal.jpg   Let's talk about anchors some more-fortress-vertical-center-photo.jpg  

Last edited by BrianFortress; 08-04-2012 at 06:13 AM.
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  #126  
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

Brian,

Thanks for the info. I still have trouble reconciling those test results that showed the old, tried, and true anchors (Danforth, Plow, Bruce) were disasters (wouldn't set and/or hold) and most of the new (and expensive) anchors including Fortress were all smashing successes. There are too many of the old Danforth, Plow, Bruce types in use around the world in all kinds of bottoms and wind conditions for too long. If they had anything closely resembling the Sail Magazine test performance in real life, public opinion and experience would have blacklisted those anchors out of the market years ago. I did compare the outside dimensions of the WM Performance 2 /26 lbs. and Fortress FX-37 /22 lbs. that were used in the Sail Magazine tests (but couldn't really compare fluke size), and overall dimensions didn't seem that much different. Sail did say that, using a smaller boat, they rechecked the setting ability of the anchors, and all of the tested anchors did set in that trial, but they didn't present any data of that second test. The lightweight of the Fortress and disasembly capability is certainly impressive and useful. I kind of like the idea of a FX-37 / 22 lbs. being capable of holding a 42 ft motor yacht in 140 mph.

Last edited by NCC320; 08-04-2012 at 09:18 AM.
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

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Originally Posted by NCC320 View Post
Brian,

Thanks for the info. I still have trouble reconciling those test results that showed the old, tried, and true anchors (Danforth, Plow, Bruce) were disasters (wouldn't set and/or hold) and most of the new (and expensive) anchors including Fortress were all smashing successes. There are too many of the old Danforth, Plow, Bruce types in use around the world in all kinds of bottoms and wind conditions for too long. If they had anything closely resembling the Sail Magazine test performance in real life, public opinion and experience would have blacklisted those anchors out of the market years ago.
Most of the tests are done in hard bottom types. If you anchor in these areas, particularly if you dive and look at set of anchors if matches what is shown in test results. The old generation very rarely set well in a hard sand.
There are lots of complaints about these anchors from long distance crusing sailors.
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  #128  
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

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Originally Posted by NCC320 View Post
Brian,

Thanks for the info. I still have trouble reconciling those test results that showed the old, tried, and true anchors (Danforth, Plow, Bruce) were disasters (wouldn't set and/or hold) and most of the new (and expensive) anchors including Fortress were all smashing successes. There are too many of the old Danforth, Plow, Bruce types in use around the world in all kinds of bottoms and wind conditions for too long. If they had anything closely resembling the Sail Magazine test performance in real life, public opinion and experience would have blacklisted those anchors out of the market years ago.
NCC320,

I agree. E.S. "Mac" Maloney, 90+ years young and long time author of Chapman's, has used a CQR successfully for decades. Tom Neale, another noted boating author, has cruised and lived aboard since the late 70s, logging several thousand miles per year, and he has also used a CQR successfully during that time.

If I were to suggest to them that their CQR was a bad anchor because it performed poorly in a controlled anchor test with 5 or so pulls, then I suspect their response would be one of disbelief, and possibly even hysterical laughter.

I have heard similar accolades from Bruce owners as well.

Do the "new generation" anchors offer improved performance over the older models? I believe so, but those older models certainly have earned a loyal following over the years....even up to this day. I still see them mounted on the bows of many different types of boats by a vast majority at the shows.
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  #129  
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

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Originally Posted by BrianFortress View Post
How about just two bolts...which only have to be loosened and the nuts can remain on the bolts.

Below is an image a 33 lb Rocna side-by-side with a 32 lb. Fortress FX-55.
True Mantus takes a little more to assemble and Fortress has proved to have an amazing holding power and efficiency in past tests. What distinguishes the two is Mantus was designed to be the best setting anchor and sets in places where others simply fail, which can come in handy in an emergency. What we offer is the most reliable set.
Greg
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Last edited by Mantus Anchors; 08-04-2012 at 11:55 AM.
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

No disrespect to the Fortress Team, I keep a FX-37 on my boat for a rainy day
I think in looser bottoms it is a clear winner.
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