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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #161  
Old 08-12-2012
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

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Originally Posted by blt2ski View Post
So you are saying if I show up in my supertanker, that a 70 lb danforth and some 5/8" chain will be sufficient!?!?!?!?!?!hmmmmmmmmm do not think so!

Not sure my 8' pram to go fishing out of needs 100' f 5/8" chain! probably a 5 lb coffee tin full of cement, and eye bolt and some 1/4" poly about 50' in length would do the trick!

Again, it comes down to where you are, conditions you expect etc as to what is really the "BEST" anchor/rode setup!

Marty
I'm saying for a 30 foot average sailboat a 70 pound Danforth and 5/8 chain is a good storm set up. I would go to 100 pound on 40 and up as the boat size gets bigger. Thats for storm, I think these tiny fast set things are great for a lunch hook, and I think 2 sizes above what manufactures recomend is good for working anchor, no matter what type it is. I go one step further by personal choice, but as I we know, I like big stuff to do little jobs. I alway's bring more money than I think I'll need and leave earlier than I have to incase something happens on the way. My 15 foot whaler has a 15 pound danforth and 1/4 inch chain. I dive out of it and it's alway's there when I get back to it. On our 300 foot fuel barge we have a 2000 pound danforth and 1 and 1/2 inch cable. Go as big as you can carry with out disturbing the stability of the vessel and what your windlass can handle,
( or your back)
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Last edited by Capt.aaron; 08-12-2012 at 09:29 AM.
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  #162  
Old 08-12-2012
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

People do seem very paranoid about anchor weight. OK it's at the bow, but going oversized by a couple of steps is only 30LB or so for the average boat. This sort of weight difference makes very little difference to a crusing monohull.

If someone posts a thread about carrying a couple of extra jerry cans of spare fuel for example there's no mention of weight problems, but mention a larger primary anchor, or a couple of spare anchors and often someone will comment on the detrimental effects of the weight.
Weight in the ground tackle is always worthwhile for any crusing boat.
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  #163  
Old 08-12-2012
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

I deliverd a little 27 benny first to Columbia from the key's. Long story short, the the engine died leaving Jamacia after I had loaded the rails with jerry cans of deiesl, like four on each side. The last 200 miles was big, no prolblems. What does 8 , 6 gallon jugs of deisel weigh? I sailed in to Cartegenia 4 day's later with all that fuel still on deck. We also had a big ass 5 man life raft lashed to the stern on that sugar scoop thing, that's another story, the point is, all that weight did not signifantly change the stability to any point where the geometric or transverse meta center, or center of bouyancy was unsafe. It may have helped having all that weight in the 15 footers we went through for 2 day's. Maybe that's why the boat did so well? I like having the weight of the 5/8's chain in my bow. Most of it is below the water line. And I'm kind of a weight freek, I don't have any thing not even a tooth brush stowed above the water line on my boat.
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  #164  
Old 08-12-2012
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The problem with anchoring is that It's like local knowledge; what works great in one area is sufficiently problematic elsewhere. For example; in the PNW where every backwater was used for either dumping logs, towing logs, booming logs or creating landings for logging, the bottom is covered with cables, chains, deadheads and stumps. Most welded anchors will get eaten up and swallowed. Cast anchors like the CQR on the other hand seem trouble free. On the East coast with its sand and muddy bottoms from sluggish moving waters and rivers, welded anchors especially the Danforth seems to rule as almost everyone has one and they work as designed; easy to set and easy to retrieve. For those that say they have one of everything, well hallelujah. I'm not sure where they stow them but cudos for being prepared. Weight really isn't an issue, if a boats reserve flotation isn't sufficient to carry the weight of an anchor you've more problems than being grounded. Even a 20' 2000lb boat can lift a 200lb anchor. It's about the set and scope not weight. The set is subject to variations but not the scope. Even a 10:1 scope could be an issue. If your sitting in 30' of water when you drop anchor, and there's a 10' tide; you're now siting in 40' of water and 300' of rode you had giving you a scope of 7.5:1. Now that's okay, but if the weather is snotty with a little swell and a blow, it could easily drag. In areas of higher tides this is even more of an issue; that's why it's called an anchor watch. Weight of the rode which affect the angle and bite of the set seems to be the only common factor related to ground type. While I prefer all chain for the most part, I do have another setup next to my all chain that's made of 100' feet of chain and 300' of nylon rode that I'll sometimes use to double up. Others don't like all chain, sobeit as long as they not drifting over my anchor line or into me, I really could care less. Unfortunately, anchoring isn't even like which underwear to put on in the morning as there's more variations of anchoring than there are of Tommy Hilfigers.
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  #165  
Old 08-12-2012
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

capt aaron i was anchored out today on my boat relaxing and thought about this thread. I looked around at other people anchored out. there was another sailboat out there with the line going almost vertical with the boat looked pretty much like mine. But then looked at a 30' cabin/day cruiser and looked at his anchor line and it was straight down and i just shook my head and thought about this thread.
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  #166  
Old 08-13-2012
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

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Originally Posted by smallboatlover View Post
capt aaron i was anchored out today on my boat relaxing and thought about this thread. I looked around at other people anchored out. there was another sailboat out there with the line going almost vertical with the boat looked pretty much like mine. But then looked at a 30' cabin/day cruiser and looked at his anchor line and it was straight down and i just shook my head and thought about this thread.
Scope. It's really all about scope. I like weight, that's me, other people like light, that's fine, but we all need scope. I took out the 40 foot dive boat yesterday on a little half day charter, I like to anchor for a swim in a little mangrove creek with poor holding at the end of the day. I put down a 45 pound danforth and a 3 to 1 scope ratio of 5/8 chain, ( tech. not enough) I just sit there on the weight of the chain, it's going straight down. If you looked over at me you might say what a dip sh!t. But I know I am doing it, and I'm watching what's going on, I would never leave it there. ( well I did for a few minuets to kayak through a mangrove tunnel) but it was very calm and slack tide and I know the creek well. You never know what the other dude is doing or riding on, but, recreational boaters who were trained by recreational boaters, who were trained by some one who became a professional recreational boater trainer some times have bad habbits and it usually presents itself in anchoring skills.
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Last edited by Capt.aaron; 08-13-2012 at 06:02 PM.
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  #167  
Old 08-14-2012
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Let's talk about anchors some more

Yea well im not always sure on depth i just let a lot out so its not straight down. But it puts me boat a good 30-40 ft fom were the actual anchor is in a bout 15ft of water roughly
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  #168  
Old 08-15-2012
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

if you are truly in 15' of water, and 40' behind the anchor, that puts your triangle hypotenuse at about 43', so 43/15 is just under 3-1. With 7-1 you would have out at least 105' of rode/chain. or that would be what most would call 7-1 with 15' of water depth. If you have very light winds, a LONG heavy chain, you may be able to be at that 40 or so feet behind the anchor and still be in the 5-1 range......not sure you are at 7-1 unless you have all chain, and heavy chain at that!

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  #169  
Old 08-15-2012
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Depth at maximum tide x 7= Amount of rode for 7:1 scope, the minimum requirement for safe anchoring.
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Old 08-15-2012
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Re: Let's talk about anchors some more

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Originally Posted by sea_hunter View Post
(Depth at maximum tide+height from water to bow roller) x 7= Amount of rode for 7:1 scope, the minimum requirement for safe anchoring.
Minor correction, but it can make a difference in shallow water. If you anchor in 10 feet of water with a 4 foot freeboard, you put out 98 feet, not 70. Or said differently, if you only put 70 feet out, you only have a roughly 5 to 1 scope.
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