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-   -   Crash jibe buffer (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/seamanship-navigation/94841-crash-jibe-buffer.html)

davidpm 12-10-2012 12:21 AM

Crash jibe buffer
 
I help deliver a 50' boat a couple weekends ago. We sailed all night on a run wing on wing. Wind was about 15 knots. Under those conditions I would usually rig a dock line from the boom to the rail as a preventer as it is really hard to see the sails in the dark.
There are some disadvantages having a preventor that can't be released easily too but still it seems the lessor to two evils if you don't have a real boom brake.

All he did was leave the traveler uncleated on both sides. When we did inevitably jibe the traveler pulling it's line through the blocks has a pretty good damping effect.

I'm not saying I would do it myself except in very light air but it did seem to work. The rig stayed up.

drhoward20 12-10-2012 07:42 AM

re: Crash jibe buffer
 
stupid

Minnewaska 12-10-2012 08:26 AM

re: Crash jibe buffer
 
I had to think about that for a minute. You either keep the loaded side cleated or, when the traveler moves to leeward, you have to pull the line through the leeward side.

Better than nothing, I suppose. Not sure I love the idea of a line being taken up off the deck, without intention. If ever there was a time for an accidental jibe, it would be on a run in the dark. :eek:

However, for that reason, I just wouldn't be on one without tying off the boom. Or, if I was concerned about the sea state and going forward to tie/untie, I would fly just the foresail or bear up and avoid the doom.

tdw 12-10-2012 07:31 PM

Re: Crash jibe buffer
 
I confess in similar circumstances I'd probably get myself more onto a broad reach. Not being one who particularly loves ddw and loathes it on a dead dark night I'd be a nervous wreck using that arrangement.

(otoh, we do have a pretty preventer which is adjustable from the cockpit, an arrangement I'd recommend.)

davidpm 12-10-2012 09:21 PM

Re: Crash jibe buffer
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by drhoward20 (Post 959383)
stupid

In general I would tend to agree. I've learned however that that one guys stupid is another guys tactic.

I crewed on a Farr 395 in a race as the main-sheet trimmer.

If you are not familiar with the Farr this boat has end boom sheeting with a traveler on the cockpit sole just a few inches forward of the pedestal with a continuous main-sheet.
So he is getting setup for a jibe and I'm attempting to haul in about 1,000' of line to center the boom to let it out on the other side.
The driver starts screaming at me to just just grab the multi-part bundle of line, duck and flip it around the pedestal while the boom goes crashing over in 20+ knots of wind.
Apparently that's the way it is done.
Needless to say I don't jibe that way unless explicitly told to by the owner.

paulk 12-10-2012 11:41 PM

Re: Crash jibe buffer
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by davidpm (Post 959750)
just just grab the multi-part bundle of line, duck and flip it around the pedestal while the boom goes crashing over in 20+ knots of wind.
Apparently that's the way it is done.

Yup, that's the way it's done. You don't have to grab the entire bundle; you can hold & pull on just half at a time. That brings it in pretty quick, and the line running back through the blocks dampens the snap when you release. It still helps to be quick, though.
On the initial post, using the traveller to absorb some of the energy in an inadvertent jybe may help keep from damaging the rig, but the swinging boom is still dangerous. Rigging a preventer line, as you suggest, is a better idea. I had a friend knocked overboard one night, surprised by a swinging boom. They never found him.

davidpm 12-11-2012 12:48 AM

Re: Crash jibe buffer
 
Whoever edited the spelling in the title. Thanks!

davidpm 12-11-2012 12:51 AM

Re: Crash jibe buffer
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by paulk (Post 959821)
Yup, that's the way it's done. You don't have to grab the entire bundle; you can hold & pull on just half at a time. T.

He didn't even have us do that.
No pulling of any line through any blocks.
Our only job was to make sure the main sheet cleared the pedestal. IE grab the bundle and walk it to the other side, fast.

zz4gta 12-11-2012 10:06 AM

Re: Crash jibe buffer
 
I'm not a fan of preventer in moderate to heavy air. I'm also not a fan of ddw sailing. It's almost always faster to hotter angles.

Preventers can snap a boom if you go into a death roll and bury the boom in a wave.

jimjazzdad 12-11-2012 10:36 AM

Re: Crash jibe buffer
 
So, no love here for Dutchman Boom Brake or similar? I currently use a preventer but was thinking in that general direction.


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