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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #21  
Old 03-04-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

a line from the bottom of the companionway over the hatch and down the other side with small clamsleats works.

Great Post!
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  #22  
Old 03-04-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

"a line from"
Eureka! Someone buy that man a beer.
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  #23  
Old 03-04-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

Quote:
Originally Posted by chucklesR View Post
If in shipping lanes, no distractions, no books etc. Constant scan (that's what watch means).
"Shipping lanes" outside of the funnel effect of major ports and inlets is a phrase that doesn't mean much anymore. There certainly are higher traffic areas, but the shipping lanes (not VTS zones) don't really exist.

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Originally Posted by chucklesR View Post
Clean the cockpit at relief, no debris (some people need to be told that). On coming watch determines when it's clean enough.
Darn tootin'. Books, hats, gloves, and water bottles with a couple of inches in the bottom all over the boat makes me nuts. Police yourself and keep a small footprint.
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  #24  
Old 03-04-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

The ISAF proscriptions for Cat 1 and 0 races is for the hatch boards to be fastened in place to prevent them from falling out in the event of a capsize. Jackdale’s tying off is perfectly acceptable. What Hellosailer is most likely referring to is the requirement that the companionway slider is “dogged” in place. You must be able to un dog and open the slider from either the outside or inside. Slider dogs is what is usually missing in boats that occasionally race offshore.
We use pins through the inside frame to secure the washboards in place as we need to store those boards flat. On our next serious yard work (when we recaulk the slider frame), our plan is to install a pair of Lewmar hatch dogs. They will dog into a pair of slots in the frame. The added feature of this set up is we will gain a little more in-harbor security as we will be able to lock the slider in place from the inside of the boat.
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  #25  
Old 03-04-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bene505 View Post

Are you sailing straight through, or stopping off in Greenland or Iceland along the way?
I think Greenland's out -- way too early for the ice to have cleared enough to get in. Iceland, maybe......as always, it all depends on the weather!!!!....which depends on how the jet stream sets up in June. And then there's the issue of how much ice is hanging around Newfoundland, etc. etc. etc.

Ask me again in early June.
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Old 03-04-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

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Originally Posted by chucklesR View Post
On daytime watch changes I'd add a deck walk down / rigging / chaffing check unless you consider that a skippers only responsibility. Tethered of course. That also makes them more familiar with tethered work on deck.
Skipper does this on my boat at least twice a day --- usually first thing in the morning and once before the sun goes down...and unless it's really nice out I prefer people to stay in the cockpit unless there's a need to go forward.

Quote:
If in shipping lanes, no distractions, no books etc. Constant scan (that's what watch means).
This, dear friends, is the value of AIS -- all the big fellas have it and show up on your plotter long before you see them. Most of your AIS "contacts" are never actually eyeballed because they're so far away. And the data that all boats send out takes the guess work out of "which way is he heading, how close will he come to us, etc." Fishing boats, however, are another matter -- many don't have AIS and so when in areas where fishers concentrate (e.g. Gulf of Maine), it is prudent to keep a much sharper watch.

Quote:
At night, tethered no matter where you are. Especially if alone.
If more than one on watch, one is tethered at all times.
In general, I agree. But, every boat is different. On ours you can sit under the hard dodger forward of the wheel and be totally secure. The sides of the dodger and the wheel form a barrier that you need to work around to get out into the open behind the wheel. (The older I get, the harder it is to do this 10-15 times during a watch.) That's why our general rule is that you clip on before going aft of the wheel. General rules get modified as conditions change, of course.

Quote:
Clean the cockpit at relief, no debris (some people need to be told that). On coming watch determines when it's clean enough.
Anyone who relieves themselves in my cockpit better clean it up!!!

Quote:
The first act of the watch is to update the log,
The last act of the watch is to update the log.
I wan the guy coming on to know what's happened and so ask that they read the log and get a briefing before assuming the watch. The off going watch stander writes the log for the his watch.
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Old 03-05-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

Quote:
Originally Posted by chucklesR View Post

The first act of the watch is to update the log,
The last act of the watch is to update the log.

Ok, I don't want to start being picky because its not the intent of anything here... But just 'saying' things that don't conform to reality just makes the poor crews job confusing and irrelevant.

The first thing one does on watch is to take the hand over from the previous watch keeper. Then go out on deck and sail the boat.
It can't be to update the log because that has just been done by the retiring watch keeper. Not only that but the new watch keeper will be wrong in what he puts in the log because he hasn't been sailing the boat since hi sprevious watch. So if he looks, for example at the wind meter and writes that in the log he doesn't know if its a gust, average, high or low. Same with direction, heading, current etc etc. he needs to go straight on deck and sail the boat and then update the log at a suitable time lapse. (Which I recommend every 4 hours, but every skipper is different).

Disagree with the shipping lane stuff too. If you bore the crew senseless they will be senseless and fall asleep at night, shipping lane or not.

What I feel important is the watch keeper to have a watch that interests him enough to keep him excited and awake. Better to have a speed competition with the other watches than bore him by reefing because its night. Or having too short a watch - if its only a 2 or 3 hour watch its not long enough on a sail boat to get anywhere... You can see two hours forward... But four hours coastal you have seen a lighthouse from nothing, thru loom, to light and then back to darkness... Weather is the same: four hours has given a cycle of weather even in the tropics it's never the same over the watch.

By giving excitement and not being pedantic you give the crew the things they want. And if they are not then repos able enough to be left of deck unsupervised then you need to retrain them or replace them.

There is theoretical safety and practical safety and in cruising I feel it should err on the side of practical or you will be without crew! Or wife! If one is in the Navy it's different. There you can spend three hours writing the log because there's others looking out the window... And there's other to keep you awake during the graveyard shift. But that theoretical safety isn't going to be safe when there's only one on watch on a cruising boat.

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  #28  
Old 03-05-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

hatches--i have doors, no problem...
overhead hatches are mostly not considered...they ARE important ..can keep water out when and if you are knocked down.
there was a boat lost in pacific some years ago--overcanvassed on the pacific side of cedros island -- knocked down and never seen again nor heard from. no epirb, just gone. no call out for help--just gone. btw--was a baba 30. sailing with overhead hatches open and knocked down..bye bye....
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  #29  
Old 03-05-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

There is a tendency to think about watch length from the perspective of the watchstander. That isn't nearly as important as considering it from the perspective of the off-watch. The off-watch HAS to get enough rest to be effective. Two hour stints aren't enough for most people. 4-on/4-off can be maintained for a long time. 4-on/8-off can be maintained indefinitely.
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  #30  
Old 03-05-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

Quote:
Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
There is a tendency to think about watch length from the perspective of the watchstander. That isn't nearly as important as considering it from the perspective of the off-watch. The off-watch HAS to get enough rest to be effective. Two hour stints aren't enough for most people. 4-on/4-off can be maintained for a long time. 4-on/8-off can be maintained indefinitely.
4 on - 8 off works well on 3 watch systems. remember to to account for berth arrangements. Simple hot bunking does not work.

For two-watch system, I have had success with a modified Swedish system. 0600-1200, 1200-1800, 1800-2300, 2300-0300, 0300-0600. I like at least two on a watch. BTW - this is a long passages without an autopilot.
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