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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


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  #31  
Old 03-05-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
4 on - 8 off works well on 3 watch systems. remember to to account for berth arrangements. Simple hot bunking does not work.
Agreed. Depends on the boat. Often rotating hot-bunking is required. Slightly bigger boat and everyone gets their own rack. Sometimes I sleep on the floor. Depends on boat layout. I despise boats with the head forward. Heads should be at the foot of the companionway.

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Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
For two-watch system, I have had success with a modified Swedish system. 0600-1200, 1200-1800, 1800-2300, 2300-0300, 0300-0600. I like at least two on a watch. BTW - this is a long passages without an autopilot.
I rarely move a boat without an autopilot. I've had to turn the a/p off as fuel got low a couple of times. As long as the weather is settled a four hour watch is still fine -- I staff for single-handed watches. If each of two crew can't stand a watch alone what does putting them together gain? I have had two-handed watches on owner-aboard deliveries when there was a training component to the job.

My preferred crew size is four (including me). Crew stand 4-on/8-off while I do the cooking, weather, first called, and generally keep an eye on things. It gives me the time and energy to work on any skills a particular crew member wants support with, check in at watch changes and once or twice during watch, and still get enough rest to be on top of my game. YMMV. This is what works best for me.
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  #32  
Old 03-05-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

Very nice. I've created my own version for my boat as the detailed instructions will vary per the equipment on the boat. On mine I've added checking the LifeTag MOB modules and their blinking light before going on deck and looking at the Sirius satellite weather instead of the barometer.

Passagemaking on my boat is rather minor. On the Great Lakes the passages are usually less than 48 hours.

One thing that I think is helpful to add for novice crew is protection of night vision. Everyone reads their Ipads and other things, then cannot see squat at night.

GJ
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  #33  
Old 03-05-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

2 handed watch system I use
0000-0400
0400-0800
0800-1300
1300-1900
1900-2400

It neatly revolves
Get a 6 hour sleep every second day
ON watch person cooks
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  #34  
Old 03-05-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

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Originally Posted by billyruffn View Post
...Today I worked on several diagrams which I will use in these sections. They are attached below.
....
With regard to your diagrams, I don't understand keeping your ditch-bag below and away from the life-raft. In the even of catastrophic flooding and or a fire, having to go below to grab the ditch-bag may be difficult or impossible. I'd want it (keep ours) right next to the life-raft for immediate deployment. Non?
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  #35  
Old 03-05-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

Quote:
Originally Posted by svHyLyte View Post
With regard to your diagrams, I don't understand keeping your ditch-bag below and away from the life-raft. In the even of catastrophic flooding and or a fire, having to go below to grab the ditch-bag may be difficult or impossible. I'd want it (keep ours) right next to the life-raft for immediate deployment. Non?
In principle I would agree, but given the layout of the aft lazarette (where the life raft is stowed) it would be hard to fit it amonst all the other gear that needs a home in that space (stuff that I use almost every day and which needs to be accessable). It would probably take no more than 30 seconds to move the ditch kit from it's location at the nav station to the cockpit. BR's hull is steel and so I can't imagine a flooding situation that would progress so rapidly that we couldn't get the kit to the raft. A fire is another matter -- it can be sudden and catastropic -- and if that were to occur we'd have to leave the boat without the gear in the kit and make do with what's packed in the raft.

That said.....so much of sail boating is managing trade-offs. Keeping the ditch kit below and out of the way, yet readily accessible vs. having it right under the life raft is a trade-off. The quotation, "The perfect is the enemy of the good," applies.
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  #36  
Old 03-08-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

I'll add two things only to an excellent thread.

1:No peeing over the side when offshore. Provide a bucket or bottle(s) for the male crew. It's so easy when you're alone on watch to wander over to the side for quick relief, but many a sailor has gone overboard holding his.....

2: I'll second Outbound's mention of quietly monitoring your crew. I was quite surprised at how poorly an entire race boat crew did during a winter race I was on last year when we were all stricken with what we thought was mild seasickness or alcohol hangover and turned out to be just lack of adequate food and water due to austere conditions.

Personally I felt hungover and wondered if it was my first time ever being seasick. On land I felt no better, even after an hour in bed. It wasn't a hangover because it lasted well into the evening (even while abstaining from the evil drink!). However 20 minutes into dinner at home, I felt 100% normal again. Thinking that I was familiar with my body's signs from backpacking and other times of prolonged exertion with limited access to food, it turned out I didn't know all of my body's own signs. I learned something about myself that day.

I talked with the captain about it the next day and he was aware we weren't eating or drinking and that we weren't functioning well but didn't want to force us to eat and drink. He should have.

MedSailor
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Last edited by MedSailor; 03-08-2013 at 01:22 AM.
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  #37  
Old 03-08-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

Med, it sounds like you had a touch of heatsickness or heat exhaustion, which are compounded by dehydration. I find it very easy to get hit by that in very humid weather, when it is not extremely hot but the humidity prevents sweating. That's also when the rehydration mix seems to work very nicely. Folks who have not had any formal preparation to be in hot places, often are unaware they need to keep an eye on their urine color, and if it is any darker than "pale", they probably need to hydrate. They can also do a finger pinch, pinch up a fold of skin on the back of a knuckle. If the skin stays "up" and doesn't go back down right away? That's dehydration, too. (Relative to their own "normal", not necessarily to each other.)
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Old 03-08-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

I am impressed with the attention that BillyRuffn has given to the diagrams of his safety related items... I will review my procedures and equipment (as I do at the start of each season) and see how I can implement some or all of his ideas. One thought I had this winter is to obtain an extra fire extinguisher to be easily available in the cockpit. With fires most likely at/near the engine or galley - both of which are very close to the companion way - we may not have ready access to the equipment mounted at/inside the companion way.
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  #39  
Old 03-08-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

i have a fire extinguisher at the companionway entrance--is handy for engine as wellas for the potential genny fires on the bow--dont ask me how i know, but the fire was done with by the time the fire folks arrived..
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  #40  
Old 03-08-2013
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Re: Tips on Watch Standing

HS - great advice.

I tell my crew to check the colour of their urine before they flush. As well when you are dehydrating your urine tends to smell bloody awful.

If you are thirsty - you are dehydrating.
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