Singlehanding to and from the dock - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation
 Not a Member? 

Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 07-30-2010
jaschrumpf's Avatar
1975 Newport 28
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Monrovia, MD
Posts: 573
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
jaschrumpf is on a distinguished road
I'm in a slip with fixed docks, with a finger pier on my left if you stand on the dock looking out. There are pilings on both sides about 30' out from the main dock, and I have "cheater lines" stretched between the pilings parallel to the boat.

The best aid I've found for single handing docking is a short line (3-4') tied to the end of the finger pier with a bowline at the end. When I back in, the first thing I do is slip that bowline over a winch, and that holds the boat close to the finger pier, which is lined with fenders so I don't have to worry about bumping against it. I then run forward and grab the windward bow line off of whichever outer pier it might be, and do a quick-n-dirty tie-off on the bow cleat on that side.

Now I've got the boat secured tight to the finger pier and protected by fenders, and the bow is centered in the slip by the windward line. After that, it's a simple matter to go around the boat and get the rest of the lines secured.

I'm on a creek where current is not an issue; usually it's the wind that makes the difference, and keeping the boat tight to the finger pier means only one other line needs to be dealt with ASAP.

That little line has made single handed docking a piece of cake. I routinely back her in, bring her to a dead stop a couple of feet from the main dock, cut the engine and put that line over the winch without hardly thinking of it.

I have more difficulty getting her out of the slip, as the wind usually blows the bow over before I can get back to the controls and I almost always engage the rub rail on one of the outer pilings on the way out. But that what it's there for, right?

I had an interesting variation on backing into the slip this past Wednesday: my jib downhaul leaves about three feet of the jib up at the bow, and the breeze was straight out of the slip at about 3-4. My usual maneuver is to motor up to the slip with the opening on the starboard side, stop with the stern right at the slip opening and about 20' out. Then when I put her into reverse, the prop walk takes me in a big circle to the right (looking out the stern) and I make a 270-degree loop right into the slip.

This time was different: I put her into reverse, she sat there for a moment as the prop bit into the water.. and then started turning immediately to the left! I made a 90-degree left turn from a dead stop right into the slip.

Inconceivable!

The only thing I can come up with is that the bit of jib sticking up at the bow acted as enough of a windvane to keep the prop walk from taking me around as usual, and the force on it let the rudder bite immediately so that we turned left instead of making our big circle to the right, as usual.

Funny things boats do, sometimes!
__________________
S/V Free Spirit

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Monrovia, MD
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 07-30-2010
美国华人, 帆船 教授及输送
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: MD
Posts: 2,446
Thanks: 22
Thanked 19 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 8
rockDAWG is on a distinguished road
I always singlehand when sailing even if my wife with me on the boat. It is a tense moment until I purchased this DVD from Jack Klang. Now docking in any conditions is not problem. It only needs two things:

1. Relatively long springline
2. Reverse at idle

Sale page for Captain Jack Klang

__________________

Fine Print:
I am old school. Integrity is to do the right thing even when no one is watching.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 07-31-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,370
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
puddinlegs is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by rockDAWG View Post
I always singlehand when sailing even if my wife with me on the boat. It is a tense moment until I purchased this DVD from Jack Klang. Now docking in any conditions is not problem. It only needs two things:

1. Relatively long springline
2. Reverse at idle

Sale page for Captain Jack Klang

Ditto on the spring line... Done correctly for us (we're blow on or blow off 97% of the time and the boat is relatively light), the spring is at the shrouds (attached to a horn cleat on the rail) and long enough to run back to the cockpit/gate area. Coast in slow, step off the boat, make the spring which both stops the boat and then keeps it from drifting down into my neighbor, then make fast the stern line, forward spring, and then stern spring, and finally the bow.

Last edited by puddinlegs; 08-02-2010 at 01:34 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 08-18-2010
carl762's Avatar
Sundance 23
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Portland Oregon
Posts: 878
Thanks: 2
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Rep Power: 5
carl762 is on a distinguished road
I bought Jack's DVD and will practice his methods and use them exclusively for my docking needs. Also, the later half of the video is on sail trimming, which is just what I need. The DVD was an excellent investment.

There's a variation of this method written up in Good Old Boat (two issues ago).

I installed two caribeaners on the toe rail on port and starboard sides, with blocks, so I can run my 'spring' line on either side. Also, Jack suggests rigging your fenders sideways. You'll see why if you get the DVD. I need to do that to mine.
__________________
Water is Life
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 08-18-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Maple Ridge, BC
Posts: 245
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
GraemeInCanada is on a distinguished road
I'll never forget a line I read on here somewhere that said "Go in as fast as you want to crash your boat into the dock".

Essentially, take it slow, get lines ready and it'll be come second nature in no time.
__________________
My blog on boat related stuff:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 08-18-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 75
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
legarots is on a distinguished road
Something I never understood about Jack Klang's rules, as taken from his site:

1. Dock into the wind.
2. Point your bow into the wind when docking. If the wind is from astern, you'll soon be in trouble.
3. Therefore: Change the wind or change your dock.

If you have a slip at a marina, or are charting a boat, you can't change your slip (or the wind).
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 08-21-2010
jaschrumpf's Avatar
1975 Newport 28
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Monrovia, MD
Posts: 573
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
jaschrumpf is on a distinguished road
Maybe he was joking?
__________________
S/V Free Spirit

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Monrovia, MD
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 08-23-2010
shaile's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 20
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
shaile is on a distinguished road
Talking Docking

Here is an example for singlehanded docking
YouTube - Captain Ron's docking manuevers
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 08-24-2010
美国华人, 帆船 教授及输送
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: MD
Posts: 2,446
Thanks: 22
Thanked 19 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 8
rockDAWG is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by legarots View Post
Something I never understood about Jack Klang's rules, as taken from his site:

1. Dock into the wind.
2. Point your bow into the wind when docking. If the wind is from astern, you'll soon be in trouble.
3. Therefore: Change the wind or change your dock.

If you have a slip at a marina, or are charting a boat, you can't change your slip (or the wind).
If you pay attention to what he said, he was teasing.
__________________

Fine Print:
I am old school. Integrity is to do the right thing even when no one is watching.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 08-29-2010
southwindphoto's Avatar
Capt Ron
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Anastasia Island
Posts: 77
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
southwindphoto is on a distinguished road
While I’m new to sailing, I’ve been around boating my entire life.. My dad had a marina when I was a kid, and for as long as I can recall back, I remember bring boats from the marina slip over to the fuel docks, and back to their slip.

The best advice I can give anyone single handling a boat is take is slow and easy. Remember a body in motion trends to stay in motion.. So once the boat is underway, click it back in natural and let momentum take you in.

Then bump it in and out of forward, as you need to reach your target. Angel it in to the dock, and then at the last minute hit reverse with the ruttier facing the dock in reverse; then back to natural, as the boat comes to stop just inches away from the dock.

As others have said... Have fore and aft dock lines ready, and most of the time, (depending on the wind) I run forward to hand a line over to someone on the dock, then to the back.

If there is no one to help on the dock... Then make sure you angle into the wind, and current, and then have a LONG front line, that is near your cockpit, so you can jump off on the dock with it in your hand to secure the boat to the dock.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:37 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.