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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Vessels Lost, Missing, or in Danger
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  #91  
Old 10-13-2008
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Dawg...that is way out of line...he has at LEAST as much experience as the guy that left his boat out in the Pacific this week. All it takes is the right attitude and a set of big ones!
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  #92  
Old 10-13-2008
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I think I read it here somewhere. "There are two types of people, ones that wish they could and ones that already have". The second group used to be members of the first. Why do the members of the second group forget the time that they were members of the first group? We all have the same goals, some have managed to get farther along towards achieving those than others...............I'll make sure and have the "Mommy button" with me when I join group number 2!

Last edited by NCountry; 10-13-2008 at 05:48 PM.
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  #93  
Old 10-13-2008
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
ROFLMAO... Damn, nearly hurt myself laughing at that one...
Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie View Post
Dawg...that is way out of line...he has at LEAST as much experience as the guy that left his boat out in the Pacific this week. All it takes is the right attitude and a set of big ones!
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #94  
Old 10-13-2008
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No one is saying people shouldn't try dangerous things. if you want to ski a double diamond trail or solo climb El Cap no climber or skier would say you shouldn't. I don't know a single skier who would not think you a fool if, the first time you went skiing in your life, you strapped on wooden skies from the nineteen thirties and tackled an icy double diamond. And I don't know any climber who wouldn't be shaking his head if, totally innocent of climbing skills, you tackled a 10.+ alone wearing old running shoes and using a few hundred feet of clothesline for a toprope.

This was a similar stunt. Someone doing any of the above might be considered as having "big ones" by the general public but would be thought a fool by those that have been there. Spirit and guts are great, but when you try something really hard (and really dangerous) a little preparation is not only helpful, it is essential.

One thread running through all these sports is respect for nature. That's what this guy was lacking.
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  #95  
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A better parallel scenario than the ones I made up in the previous post would be made using the Iraq war some cited in earlier posts. God knows all those that are serving there deserve our thanks and admiration, but the parallels that were made in earlier posts didn't really capture the situation. Of course you would go and help anyone there, but not all rescues are the same.

Suppose some media type just got off a plane from the US, someone who had never served in the armed forces or had ever been in a war zone before and had no idea of what was going on. This person, after being warned by local commanders to stay away from a particularly dangerous area, ignored all advice and went there anyway, because that's where he thought he could get the "best story". Now you and your buddies have to go pull his a** out of the fire and engage in a nasty fire fight to do so.

Do you still admire his spunk?
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Last edited by genieskip; 10-13-2008 at 06:36 PM.
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  #96  
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Ok, you guys have the right of it! Anyone not doing it your way and to your approval needs to sink and no one should risk anything to rescue them!
Please show me where sailing experience is needed to listen to a bunch of folks talking and acting like a bunch of gossipy little old ladies at the laundermat discussing everyone else's lives and how they should have done things. Pulease excuse me if I still jump in to save them if it becomes my turn again. Please do not blame that choice on the victim I am trying to save in anyway, whether or not I come back! I choose. Me. The people being used to support the idea that having to rescue folks is wrong in this thread evidently believed as I do, and I am very glad there are still folks out there that save the rest of us idiots when we do something stupid. BS dishonors their memory.
Like I said before, let the one that never did anything stupid please throw the first stone.
By the way, I have my aluminum dinghy, a Puffer, and maybe a Y-flyer. I still have not sailed even once that I know of. I went and picked up the oars and mast for the Puffer today. I expect it's first time on the water with me in it will be a rowing/fishing day. I have to make a new boom and sails after repairing the hull completely.
For the record, I would not try what this guy did in a boat I did not know by heart and trust completely without backup. I just don't insist that other folks do things my way. All I see is a youngun that stuck his neck out and got spanked. Now he will ask questions that some of you can answer, if you are willing. A lot of the time younguns can't accept the answers until they have seen the questions. Even a bigger percentage of the time when you are discussing a young man that has been trained to think and act depending on his own skills to survive. Seems some of you have forgotten youth and being bulletproof!

Last edited by runner; 10-13-2008 at 06:47 PM.
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  #97  
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I never said I admired anyone's spunk in the first place.
In that situation I would discipline the person that was supposed to keep him and everyone else uninvited out of the area, but yes, I would jump to go pull his bacon out of the fire. The area commander would not like me much afterward tho! Rescues are almost always people that made some seemingly stupid mistake for whatever reason. Would I go risk my life to rescue people from their attics because they were too stupid to obey a manditory evacuation during a hurricane? Yep!
The sea has very little to do with this story except that it is what put the whuppin on the boy!

Last edited by runner; 10-13-2008 at 07:07 PM.
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  #98  
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He ain't learned squat...now he's talking about taking your pay pal donations and buying a chinese junk. Sheesh.
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  #99  
Old 10-13-2008
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OK I guess Im going to have to go read this guys web site now...
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Old 10-13-2008
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I think part of the reason unqualified people attempt circumnavigations is that the writings of those who have -- and who are super-qualified -- make it look easy. I found Joshua Slocum's "Sailing Alone Around the World" on line:

Sailing Alone Around the World, by Joshua Slocum, 1900

Though I don't really know if it's the full, unabridged version or not.

Anyway, when one reads passages like this:
"...one day, well off the Patagonian coast, while the sloop was reaching under short sail, a tremendous wave, the culmination, it seemed, of many waves, rolled down upon her in a storm, roaring as it came. I had only a moment to get all sail down and myself up on the peak halliards, out of danger, when I saw the mighty crest towering masthead-high above me. The mountain of water submerged my vessel. She shook in every timber and reeled under the weight of the sea, but rose quickly out of it, and rode grandly over the rollers that followed. It may have been a minute that from my hold in the rigging I could see no part of the <cite>Spray's</cite> hull."
Slocum makes it sound almost routine. He sees the wave coming, drops sail and scampers into his rigging to get high above the deck and not be washed off. Easy, right?

Then there's this:
"I had just finished reading some of the most interesting of the old voyages in woe-begone ships, and was already near Port Macquarie, on my own cruise, when I made out, May 13, a modern dandy craft in distress, anchored on the coast. Standing in for her, I found that she was the cutter-yacht <cite>Akbar</cite>, which had sailed from Watson's Bay about three days ahead of the <cite>Spray</cite>, and that she had run at once into trouble. No wonder she did so. It was a case of babes in the wood or butterflies at sea. Her owner, on his maiden voyage, was all duck trousers; the captain, distinguished for the enormous yachtsman's cap he wore, was a Murrumbidgee whaler before he took command of the <cite>Akbar</cite>; and the navigating officer, poor fellow, was almost as deaf as a post, and nearly as stiff and immovable as a post in the ground. These three jolly tars comprised the crew. None of them knew more about the sea or about a vessel than a newly born babe knows about another world. They were bound for New Guinea, so they said; perhaps it was as well that three tenderfeet so tender as those never reached that destination.

"Up anchor," I shouted, "up anchor, and let me tow you into Port Macquarie, twelve miles north of this."

The trifling service proffered by the <cite>Spray</cite> would have saved their vessel.

"Report us," they cried, as I stood on--"report us with sails blown away, and that we don't care a dash and are not afraid."

"Then there is no hope for you," and again "Farewell."

It was about eighteen days before I heard of the <cite>Akbar</cite> again, which was on the 31st of May, when I reached Cooktown, on the Endeavor River, where I found this news:

May 31, the yacht <cite>Akbar</cite>, from Sydney for New Guinea, three hands on board, lost at Crescent Head; the crew saved.

So it took them several days to lose the yacht, after all.
* * *
Not much has changed, eh?
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