HMS Bounty in trouble... - Page 52 - SailNet Community
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post #511 of 1950 Old 11-08-2012
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Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

If he were asked, not ordered, to leave by port officials it would not be surprising that it would be kept quiet, indeed even covered up by politicians. There still could have been a whole host of reasons prompting him to leave that would not easily come to light. I'll wait to see what mitigating information emerges. Of course he should have resisted any coercion and has the ultimate responsibility but we may hear things that make us less ready to hang him by the yardarm in effigy.

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post #512 of 1950 Old 11-08-2012
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Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hartley18 View Post
Here's an interesting statement in that article:
"The Bounty's three masts were visible for some time above the waves but from Tuesday night, the Coast Guard has been unable to locate the ship, Patterson said. The water depth where Bounty sank is around 13,000 feet, he said." (my emphasis)

So, technically, yes, it's possible she's still floating around out there somewhere.. like a shipping container... As I see it, that she has sunk is not, technically, a known fact at this time.

I remember reading stories of old English naval timber hulks (old warships without masts) being disposed of at sea initially refusing to sink after losing their ballast.
I am no ship designer, but does not it seem strange the Bounty stayed afloat for so long? If the ship was properly ballasted would not she sink quickly once flooded (maybe there was a large air pocket). But the ship had been rebalasted and the CG had a diffciency noted on one of the inspections that the ships records on the reballast was not correct. The records were later corrected. Seems somthings up with the ballasting.
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post #513 of 1950 Old 11-08-2012
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Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewgyver View Post
...

Paolo, I'm not trying to push your buttons, but it's not nonsense. Saying "several newspapers reported" is NOT citing a source.

...
There you go again:

I posted this:

"This was not the first time the Bounty was in peril. In 1998, several newspapers reported the ship almost sank after three of its bilge pumps failed.

Investigators said the ship started taking on water when a storm banged the ship around, loosening the caulking between the planks and allowing water to seep in. The Coast Guard responded and delivered pumps to the troubled vessel."


and the source is this:

2nd day of searching for ship's captain is unsuccessful | HamptonRoads.com | PilotOnline.com

But if you want more we can get back to 1998:

"The HMS Bounty, which has helped keep tourism afloat in St. Petersburg for more than 20 years, almost sank this weekend near Charleston, S.C., after three of its bilge pumps failed.

The 169-foot wooden ship was on its way from Massachusetts to Florida when the ship began to take water around 9:30 p.m. Saturday, said Coast Guard Lt.j.g. Simone Brisco.

A helicopter, two cutters, two Navy ships and a tug boat responded to the call, delivering five portable pumps to the crew of 22. No one was injured. There were no passengers on the 1960 replica of the original 18th century English ship used in the movie Mutiny on the Bounty.

A Navy damage control team boarded the ship to help remove water from the hull and stabilize the ship, which was then safe enough for the crew to steer to port.
......
Investigators say the ship began taking on water after it ran into a storm and caulking between the planks was loosened.

"It was not a phenomenal storm," said Lt. Jeff Carter, a senior investigating officer with the Coast Guard. But the weather was rough enough to bang it around, he said. After the caulking loosened, water began to seep inside.

The main dewatering pump, which operates on diesel fuel and had evidence of wear, failed first, Carter said.

The two backup pumps, which operate on electricity, failed after the wires got wet."

...


SOURCE:

http://www.sptimes.com/SouthPinellas...rly_sinks.html


Well, and we learned something more. The guys of the gCaptain forum posted recent photos of the bilge of Bounty and they said that the boat had only two electric pumps and an odd hydraulic pump connected to the engines.

It seemed that in 1998 the electrical pumps were not the main ones but that existed a main diesel one, in bad shape. I believe that the Bounty organization reported that the boat was in danger because it had lost the engines and the generators were not working preventing the pumps to work. What happened to the diesel main pump? It was not replaced?

Regards

Paulo

Last edited by PCP; 11-10-2012 at 02:04 PM.
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post #514 of 1950 Old 11-08-2012
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Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewgyver View Post
Casey, I was never really suggesting that they did. I was only pointing out the unreliability of the mainstream media to even ask the right person, and even when they do, they often don't ask the right questions. I've never been to New London, but it took less than a minute to find out who the Harbormaster is.

I personally don't think the Bounty was asked or ordered to leave port, but it was a question raised that hasn't been answered, AFAIK.
I agree that it's unlikely. But if in the unlikely event that it's true, the port has a HUGE incentive to keep it hush-hush, since it would expose them to huge liability for the accident. So the fact that this has not been disclosed has absolutely no bearing on whether it's true or not.
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post #515 of 1950 Old 11-08-2012
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Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hartley18 View Post
Here's an interesting statement in that article:
"The Bounty's three masts were visible for some time above the waves but from Tuesday night, the Coast Guard has been unable to locate the ship, Patterson said. The water depth where Bounty sank is around 13,000 feet, he said." (my emphasis)

So, technically, yes, it's possible she's still floating around out there somewhere.. like a shipping container... As I see it, that she has sunk is not, technically, a known fact at this time.

I remember reading stories of old English naval timber hulks (old warships without masts) being disposed of at sea initially refusing to sink after losing their ballast.
I would not be surprised at all if she was floating. Wood boats, even with a lot of engine weight will float. She had a LOT of wood. If she rolled, she may have expelled any lead ballast. In the pictures, it looks like she is floating quite nicely. If there were enough ballast to overcome the buoyancy of the wood, she would have gone down in minutes or at least have become partially submerged, bow or stern sticking up. The CG said they had lost track of her but they are not in the business of keeping track of hazards to navigation offshore.

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Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeFive View Post

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brewgyver
Casey, I was never really suggesting that they did. I was only pointing out the unreliability of the mainstream media to even ask the right person, and even when they do, they often don't ask the right questions. I've never been to New London, but it took less than a minute to find out who the Harbormaster is.
I personally don't think the Bounty was asked or ordered to leave port, but it was a question raised that hasn't been answered, AFAIK.
I agree that it's unlikely. But if in the unlikely event that it's true, the port has a HUGE incentive to keep it hush-hush, since it would expose them to huge liability for the accident. So the fact that this has not been disclosed has absolutely no bearing on whether it's true or not.
I don't disagree, but if I could find a Las Vegas bookie willing to take a bet on whether BOUNTY was ordered to leave port or not, I'd be willing to place a heavy bet against it... (grin)

Wouldn't you think that with all the real-time BOUNTY Facebook/website postings and whatnot around the time of their departure, that if they had indeed been ordered to vacate New London, such a fact might have rated at least ONE mention, from someone concerned/involved, somewhere?
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Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

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I think you mean WEST !
Ha! You're right.


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Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

Owners page is all hog wash, there is something not right about what's going on, they hired a person to try and salvage the boat but the lady kills family posted they haven't got a call or even a coffee. Bounty corp Facebook page deleting anyone who as questions and insults the family.. Pretty insane read. Groups called hms bounty in retrospect.
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Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

Quote:
Originally Posted by smurphny View Post
I would not be surprised at all if she was floating. Wood boats, even with a lot of engine weight will float. She had a LOT of wood. If she rolled, she may have expelled any lead ballast. In the pictures, it looks like she is floating quite nicely. If there were enough ballast to overcome the buoyancy of the wood, she would have gone down in minutes or at least have become partially submerged, bow or stern sticking up. The CG said they had lost track of her but they are not in the business of keeping track of hazards to navigation offshore.
I should have said that eventually the timber (that is, the timber normally above the water line) gets water-logged and any remaining air trapped in compartments seeps out and down she goes... but it can take hours or days, not minutes.

Unless the sea has been amazingly calm (keeping the ship still) she'll have sunk by now for sure.

I wonder if any wreckage/oil slick will come ashore anywhere?



(EDIT: It was also not unknown for sunken timber ships, like HMS Bounty, to surface again - particularly at night - after being submerged long enough to lose their ballast out the bottom, scaring the stuffing out of anyone passing by.

We had one instance of that right here: A plastic Adams 10 day racing yacht sank out on the bay after a port/stbd collision with another boat tore a chunk out of the bow below the waterline. For a month or two afterward, the boat drifted around on the currents occasionally rising briefly from the depths at night and scaring the shite out of local fishermen: "there's a sea-monster out there!", "must be a huge whale!", before sinking again without a trace. She was eventually found many miles from where she sank, raised, repaired and is now racing again, and winning.

...but I digress... )

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"Honestly, I don't know why seamen persist in getting wrecked in some of the outlandish places they do, when they can do it in a nice place like Fiji." -- John Caldwell, "Desperate Voyage"

Last edited by Classic30; 11-09-2012 at 02:24 AM.
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Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

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