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post #20 of Old 10-30-2017 Thread Starter
pdqaltair
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Re: What if No-Chain?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnesail View Post
That was my thought as well. The stuff is so hard to cut, I find it hard to believe that it's not more chafe resistant than nylon.

But again, this is just my impression.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnesail View Post
That was my thought as well. The stuff is so hard to cut, I find it hard to believe that it's not more chafe resistant than nylon.

But again, this is just my impression.

Yeah, this was a surprise to me as well. It's tough to cut with knife or scissors. But this has been born out in multiple tests with several related methods. Additionally, Dyneema with a tight (NER's Spectra chafe Sleeve and WR-2) cross weave is quite chafe resistant side-to-side and on rocks and stanchions. It was actually testing regarding stanchion wear with synthetic lifelines that started me down this path. It seems that Amsteel is the wrong material in that application as well.

1. If the abrasive material is stone, it it so much harder than Dyneema it does not matter.

2. If the weave is loose and the material is abrasive (not smooth like a knife, it can pluck fibers out.

3. One of the primary chafe resistance mechanism is retention of cut fibers, that hence become protective, like the tip of a broom. This is the primary function of many anti-chafe coatings, like Yale Maxijacket; they retain the damaged fibers. On a loose weave, this does not happen. On a tightly woven cover, many of the fibers run cross-wise.

I invite others to test this. A simple way is to use a long pendulum with a heavy weight. I believe this better simulates what happens at anchor, with the boat yawing, than industry standard lengthwise chafe tests. The industry tests are great for measuring wear over sheaves and around guides, which is really more representative of how ropes should be used.

I'm not that big a believe in the invincibility of Amsteel. I've seen a lot of seriously fuzzed soft shackles, and one of the shroud tensioners on my boat snapped a month ago because it was rubbing very lightly, side-to-side, on a block. As I said, end-to-end is great.

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