How To Find Buyer's Broker in Florida - SailNet Community
 1Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 11 Old 02-05-2018 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
aybabtme's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Theoretically in Florida. In practice, all over the place.
Posts: 29
Thanks: 4
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
How To Find Buyer's Broker in Florida

Hey there, as posted in my intro, I'm trying to acquire a first sailboat. From talking to a bunch of people and reading books, I've been told it's a good idea to find a broker to help me out in the search process. I've also been warned that there's a lot of not-so-reputable brokers, and to be careful who I deal with. So I guess the safe thing to do is to ask strangers on the internet for help!

How does one go about finding a good buyer's broker? Specifically, I'm starting my search in Florida, willing to expand to most of the East-Coast.

For background, I'm looking to get something:
- to live aboard, do coastal cruising and do some island hoping with (not thinking of doing ocean crossing)
- will keep for maybe a year or two before upgrading (or maybe ditching the whole idea due to tears, disillusionment or bankruptcy)
- production boats like Catalina/Beneteau/Hunter/...
- up to 40k$
- 30 to 40ft
- ready to cruise
- easy to single hand sail
- sloop
- centerline berth would be cool!
aybabtme is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 Old 02-05-2018
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 19,214
Thanks: 82
Thanked 539 Times in 516 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
Re: How To Find Buyer's Broker in Florida

First, a general point. There is technically no such thing as a buyer's broker, unless you pay them on top of the purchase price. 99+% of the time, if there are two brokers involved, they split the commission paid by the seller. That makes them legally liable to represent the seller. Nevertheless, there are good people out there who won't steer you wrong, so it's good to look for them.

I have no FL references, but assume you've scanned your own network horizon: friends with boats, friends of friends, etc?

If you have a brand of boat that you are most interested in, try to look up your closest dealer and see if they have a used boat salesman. Often, all their salesman do both new and used. They should be most knowledgeable of the fleet and what to look for. They will show you their own stuff first, but are usually happy to sell whatever you're willing to buy, so will move on to the open market, if they don't have what you want.

I suggest you make it clear that you'll commit to one broker for a reasonable period of time, say 90 days. Tell them that. If you like them, then renew the agreement at the end. The commission in your price range is not going to be huge, especially when split with the seller's broker and given all the time that will be needed. If they think you'll drop them for the next broker or deal, they really can't afford to spend much time on you. However, if they aren't responsive, aren't working for you or aren't finding what you want, then fire them. But be clear, don't leave them hanging. It's a small community and, whoever else you want to engage, may hear their story, told their way. Be clear and fair.

Have you done any window shopping on Yachtworld? Coming to the table with ideas always helps. The advanced search can limit by length, geography, price and more.

Finally, if it's your first boat, do research on the process. It's very different from buying a house or car. A good broker will walk you through it. There are a ton of threads here on the subject.

Good luck!
seabeau likes this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Jeanneau 54DS

In the harsh marine environment, something is always in need of repair. Margaritas fix everything.
Minnewaska is offline  
post #3 of 11 Old 02-05-2018
Master Mariner
 
capta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: somewhere south of civilization
Posts: 6,939
Thanks: 135
Thanked 365 Times in 353 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Re: How To Find Buyer's Broker in Florida

My buyer's broker flew from Minnesota to NY and back on his own nickle to help me out. Only cost me the gas to get him to and from the airport and lunch. PM me if you want his contact info.

"Any idiot can make a boat go; it takes a sailor to stop one." Spike Africa aboard the schooner Wanderer in Sausalito, Ca. 1964.
“Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.” ― Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

facebook.com/svskippingstone
capta is offline  
 
post #4 of 11 Old 02-05-2018
Senior Member
 
Caribbeachbum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 132
Thanks: 3
Thanked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Rep Power: 6
 
Re: How To Find Buyer's Broker in Florida

Quote:
Originally Posted by aybabtme View Post
Hey there, as posted in my intro, I'm trying to acquire a first sailboat. From talking to a bunch of people and reading books, I've been told it's a good idea to find a broker to help me out in the search process....
You will probably not find one worth having given your budget. Buy a couple of books, make a few sailor friends, and learn enough to find your boat without one.

-
Caribbeachbum is offline  
post #5 of 11 Old 02-05-2018
Senior Member
 
contrarian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 343
Thanks: 6
Thanked 22 Times in 21 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Re: How To Find Buyer's Broker in Florida

A quick search on Yachtworld advanced search with the perimeters of: Gulf Coast Newer than 1990, 30-40 feet and a max price of 40k comes up with several candidates that I think match up with your requirements. A 1990 Catalina 34, a 1992 Hunter33.5, a 98 Catalina 32, a 2000 Catalina 310 and a 92 Endeavour cat if you are inclined that way. Each of which will have pluses and minuses. There are some newer Hunters but you stated that you wanted to easily single hand and about 1995 or so Hunter went off on this weird tangent of placing the primaries on the coach roof which I personally think is a totally retarded idea. Granted the sheeting angles are tighter but the first time I sailed on one, a 1999 310 with the first iteration of the traveler arch which I thought was a good idea, I couldn't figure out how you are supposed to tack the thing single handedly. They corrected this issue on the bigger boats starting around 2003 but those are going to be out of your stated price range. A good starting point would be the Catalina 320 in Long Boat key, look at the pictures closely and see if there is anything that stands out that might be a red flag. A buyers broker may spot it and then again he may not. ALL boats have issues, the more that you educate yourself on what those issues are and how to look for them the better off you will be. Take your time and enjoy the search. My family thought that I had turned boat shopping into a career.

HEY Maybe I should become a Buyers Broker :
contrarian is online now  
post #6 of 11 Old 02-06-2018 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
aybabtme's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Theoretically in Florida. In practice, all over the place.
Posts: 29
Thanks: 4
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Re: How To Find Buyer's Broker in Florida

Quote:
Originally Posted by contrarian View Post
A quick search on Yachtworld advanced search with the perimeters of: Gulf Coast Newer than 1990, 30-40 feet and a max price of 40k comes up with several candidates that I think match up with your requirements. A 1990 Catalina 34, a 1992 Hunter33.5, a 98 Catalina 32, a 2000 Catalina 310 and a 92 Endeavour cat if you are inclined that way. Each of which will have pluses and minuses. There are some newer Hunters but you stated that you wanted to easily single hand and about 1995 or so Hunter went off on this weird tangent of placing the primaries on the coach roof which I personally think is a totally retarded idea. Granted the sheeting angles are tighter but the first time I sailed on one, a 1999 310 with the first iteration of the traveler arch which I thought was a good idea, I couldn't figure out how you are supposed to tack the thing single handedly. They corrected this issue on the bigger boats starting around 2003 but those are going to be out of your stated price range. A good starting point would be the Catalina 320 in Long Boat key, look at the pictures closely and see if there is anything that stands out that might be a red flag. A buyers broker may spot it and then again he may not. ALL boats have issues, the more that you educate yourself on what those issues are and how to look for them the better off you will be. Take your time and enjoy the search. My family thought that I had turned boat shopping into a career.

HEY Maybe I should become a Buyers Broker :
Hah! Thanks a lot for looking into this! I have turned out about the same boats that you listed and you corroborate some of my friend's recs with regard to these boats.

What do you think of the Endeavour Cat? It looks pretty funny to me, and I must admit it strikes a cord (I'd like to get a nice cat long term). Otherwise, the Catalina 320 in Long Boat key was top of mind, indeed.
aybabtme is offline  
post #7 of 11 Old 02-07-2018
Senior Member
 
sailpower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Posts: 435
Thanks: 2
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 11
 
Re: How To Find Buyer's Broker in Florida

You sound like you might be new to this? If that is not the case then you probably already know what I am about to write.

Living on a boat is not like living ashore. Apart from the lack of space there is the lack of amenities.

To be truly comfortable you need a decent bunk. In your price range that will most likely not be very big but it should be accessible and in a dedicated space. Making up the salon every morning and night gets old fast.

How do you plan to shower? A typical head in this size boat is going to be small and you will have to wipe the whole thing down every time you shower. Where will the shower drain? How will you get that water off the boat? How much water capacity is there? You will have to refill it so fewer times is better.

Speaking of heads, a manual boat toilet is not like the one you have at home where, when you are finished, you pull down on a little lever and everything instantly vanishes forever. On a boat you have to pump vigorously for ten or twelve strokes to clear the lines. After that you have to pump out the holding tank when it is full so you need a place that offers that service. In spite of this your head will clog at some point and require disassembly and cleaning. Not fun as you can imagine.

Yes, you can use the marina facilities but that can also get pretty old carrying your stuff back and forth.

Living inside a thin fiberglass hull is not like living in an insulated building. Whatever the climate is outside you will feel inside. Good fans help, AC helps more. Still, it is not the same as living indoors.

Will you be living in a slip? If so you can plug in and run most anything. If not in a slip then you will most likely have DC power and power regeneration has to be addressed.

Will you be going to a job? If so you will need space for job related clothes.

Cooking is no big deal as you will most likely have propane but propane requires some vigilance especially on a boat.

Other than the price of the boat consider the immediate expenses of survey, survey haul, bottom painting, maintenance get ready, etc. Then there is insurance and dockage. Does the marina allow monthly payments or do they want ti all up front?

Can you sail now? If not do you plan to take courses? If so factor that in.

If you are doing this to try out live-aboard then the boat amenities might be more relative at this point.

So, a boat for Florida that you might want to look at is a Pearson 365 Ketch/Sloop built from 1976-1983. They feature a big galley, large head with separate stall shower, nice V-berth, 150 gallons of water in three tanks and 50 gallons of fuel.

Holding tank sizes vary. Some folks have converted one of the water tanks to a 50 gallon holding tank. Also a dedicated nav station.

Good luck. Many of us have done it.

http://web.archive.org/web/200809170...80/365/365.htm

Last edited by sailpower; 02-07-2018 at 01:15 AM.
sailpower is offline  
post #8 of 11 Old 02-07-2018 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
aybabtme's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Theoretically in Florida. In practice, all over the place.
Posts: 29
Thanks: 4
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Re: How To Find Buyer's Broker in Florida

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailpower View Post
You sound like you might be new to this? If that is not the case then you probably already know what I am about to write.
I've done some sailing and a couple of courses. About 500nm and maybe 30 days total on a boat, longest being 10 days. I'm pretty new indeed, but I feel I've been doing as due-diligence as I can for this project. I feel that at some point, the next step is to dive in and do the jump.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailpower View Post
Living on a boat is not like living ashore. Apart from the lack of space there is the lack of amenities.

To be truly comfortable you need a decent bunk. In your price range that will most likely not be very big but it should be accessible and in a dedicated space. Making up the salon every morning and night gets old fast.

How do you plan to shower? A typical head in this size boat is going to be small and you will have to wipe the whole thing down every time you shower. Where will the shower drain? How will you get that water off the boat? How much water capacity is there? You will have to refill it so fewer times is better.

Speaking of heads, a manual boat toilet is not like the one you have at home where, when you are finished, you pull down on a little lever and everything instantly vanishes forever. On a boat you have to pump vigorously for ten or twelve strokes to clear the lines. After that you have to pump out the holding tank when it is full so you need a place that offers that service. In spite of this your head will clog at some point and require disassembly and cleaning. Not fun as you can imagine.

Yes, you can use the marina facilities but that can also get pretty old carrying your stuff back and forth.
Good points!

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailpower View Post
Living inside a thin fiberglass hull is not like living in an insulated building. Whatever the climate is outside you will feel inside. Good fans help, AC helps more. Still, it is not the same as living indoors.

Will you be living in a slip? If so you can plug in and run most anything. If not in a slip then you will most likely have DC power and power regeneration has to be addressed.
Ah yup! I was an infantryman for quite a bit in my life, and in some other parts of my life, lived in metal shacks in Asia. But I agree, definitely will be a challenge and have to keep in mind creature comfort.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailpower View Post
Will you be going to a job? If so you will need space for job related clothes.
I work from home/my laptop. For the last 1.5year, I've been living in my luggages, vagabonding around the world by plane. A boat will be more stability than what I currently have in my life. =P As long as I have some sort of internet signal every now and then, I'll be good work-wise.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailpower View Post
Cooking is no big deal as you will most likely have propane but propane requires some vigilance especially on a boat.

Other than the price of the boat consider the immediate expenses of survey, survey haul, bottom painting, maintenance get ready, etc. Then there is insurance and dockage. Does the marina allow monthly payments or do they want ti all up front?
I'm not quite sure how much all of these will be, to be honest. If you have numbers in mind, that'd be helpful. I'm thinking an extra 10-20k$ in overhead?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailpower View Post
Can you sail now? If not do you plan to take courses? If so factor that in.
I can sail. Not the best out there, but I can get around.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailpower View Post
If you are doing this to try out live-aboard then the boat amenities might be more relative at this point.
Yeah, my idea is to try out live-aboard while minimizing how many eggs I put in this basket, in case I turn out to hate it. That's why I don't want to buy a 100k boat right off the bat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailpower View Post
So, a boat for Florida that you might want to look at is a Pearson 365 Ketch/Sloop built from 1976-1983. They feature a big galley, large head with separate stall shower, nice V-berth, 150 gallons of water in three tanks and 50 gallons of fuel.

Holding tank sizes vary. Some folks have converted one of the water tanks to a 50 gallon holding tank. Also a dedicated nav station.

Good luck. Many of us have done it.

Pearson 365
Thanks, I'll have a look at that model! Wasn't on my radar. Unfortunately I'm too new here to post URLs, but I have a spreadsheet I've circulated with more knowledgable-than-me friends with the list of boats I want to look at.

Thanks a lot for your insight. Very useful feedback!
aybabtme is offline  
post #9 of 11 Old 02-09-2018
██▓▓▒▒░░▒▒▓▓██
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 13,638
Thanks: 11
Thanked 253 Times in 248 Posts
Rep Power: 15
   
Re: How To Find Buyer's Broker in Florida

I think we used to hear from Richard Jordan (at Jordan's in Ft. Laud) here from time to time and he had a great reputation.
hellosailor is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to hellosailor For This Useful Post:
aybabtme (02-11-2018)
post #10 of 11 Old 02-16-2018
Senior Member
 
sailpower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Posts: 435
Thanks: 2
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 11
 
Re: How To Find Buyer's Broker in Florida

Quote:
Originally Posted by aybabtme View Post
I've done some sailing and a couple of courses. About 500nm and maybe 30 days total on a boat, longest being 10 days. I'm pretty new indeed, but I feel I've been doing as due-diligence as I can for this project. I feel that at some point, the next step is to dive in and do the jump.



Good points!



Ah yup! I was an infantryman for quite a bit in my life, and in some other parts of my life, lived in metal shacks in Asia. But I agree, definitely will be a challenge and have to keep in mind creature comfort.



I work from home/my laptop. For the last 1.5year, I've been living in my luggages, vagabonding around the world by plane. A boat will be more stability than what I currently have in my life. =P As long as I have some sort of internet signal every now and then, I'll be good work-wise.



I'm not quite sure how much all of these will be, to be honest. If you have numbers in mind, that'd be helpful. I'm thinking an extra 10-20k$ in overhead?

I can sail. Not the best out there, but I can get around.

Yeah, my idea is to try out live-aboard while minimizing how many eggs I put in this basket, in case I turn out to hate it. That's why I don't want to buy a 100k boat right off the bat.



Thanks, I'll have a look at that model! Wasn't on my radar. Unfortunately I'm too new here to post URLs, but I have a spreadsheet I've circulated with more knowledgable-than-me friends with the list of boats I want to look at.

Thanks a lot for your insight. Very useful feedback!
Infantry is hard core. I much preferred my air conditioned nuclear submarine.

10k should be more than enough unless you have to pay the marina up front

These Pearson boats switched from wood grain Formica interiors to real wood halfway through the 1980 model year.

From the listing this looks interesting with good gear and priced well.

1981 Pearson 365 Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
sailpower is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Looking for a good buyer broker Sailortobe888 Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 16 08-26-2015 01:09 PM
Boat Too Cheap to get a Buyer's Broker? tibido Boat Review and Purchase Forum 26 07-12-2013 02:47 PM
Buyer's Broker Question AleksandarB Boat Review and Purchase Forum 5 03-16-2011 10:10 PM
Choosing a buyer's broker sprattstrp Boat Review and Purchase Forum 10 05-31-2010 08:14 PM
Buyer Broker East Coast kmahren Boat Review and Purchase Forum 4 08-25-2008 05:14 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome