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post #11 of 16 Old 09-13-2018
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Re: Fiberglass Hull Deformation - Severity?

Probable cause is rig tension. Osmosis treatment, removing the gell coat probably also above sea level caused a deformation in fiberglass with the help of rigging pulling the hull. It is never a good idea to apply epoxy to overcome the fear of osmosis. The remaining water in the body causes osmosis which was the case for this boat. Although correct repairs were done later, the hull has already softened, the pull of the chain plates and and removing some of the hull material with the gell coat caused this deformation.


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post #12 of 16 Old 09-13-2018
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Re: Fiberglass Hull Deformation - Severity?

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Originally Posted by celenoglu View Post
Probable cause is rig tension. Osmosis treatment, removing the gell coat probably also above sea level caused a deformation in fiberglass with the help of rigging pulling the hull.

Although correct repairs were done later, the hull has already softened, the pull of the chain plates and and removing some of the hull material with the gell coat caused this deformation.
Did you bother to look at the pictures? The dimples are very far forward and no where near the chainplates or load path for the rig tension and run perpendicular to the direction you would expect for rig load deformation at this location. Besides for that, removing the gelcoat is an unlikely contributing cause for the deformations since gelcoat and the veil coat below it has almost no structural properties. In other words even if the gelcoat and veil coat below was removed, it would not impact the shape of the boat except cosmetically at the surface.


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It is never a good idea to apply epoxy to overcome the fear of osmosis. The remaining water in the body causes osmosis which was the case for this boat.
Its true that its important to allow the laminate to dry out once the osmosis damaged areas have been removed in order to make a decent repair. But your statement, "It is never a good idea to apply epoxy to overcome osmosis" would seem to run counter to every study that I have ever seen on addressing osmosis. Can you please supply some kind of factual basis for this statement?

After all once the laminate has been allowed to dry out, there are only two materials that recommended for repair work as a proper barrier coat; epoxy and vinylester. Epoxy offers better adhesion and a lower perm rate. Vinylester is less expensive and more ductile but needs a much thicker lay-up and so may not be suitable as a field applied barrier coat.

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post #13 of 16 Old 09-13-2018
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Re: Fiberglass Hull Deformation - Severity?

First of all I detest the term "osmosis"(I don't care about the "authorities" that use it) and it is particularly incorrect in this instance. Secondly the 29's were not a cored hull. I've surveyed many of these boats, what you are looking at is a really bad repair job. .... run !

Osmosis Testing

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post #14 of 16 Old 09-13-2018
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Re: Fiberglass Hull Deformation - Severity?

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Originally Posted by boatpoker View Post
First of all I detest the term "osmosis"(I don't care about the "authorities" that use it) and it is particularly incorrect in this instance. Secondly the 29's were not a cored hull. I've surveyed many of these boats, what you are looking at is a really bad repair job. .... run !

Osmosis Testing
I too hate the term, 'Osmosis' since its a bit misleading. Blisters are either a gelcoat/veilcoat failure or more seriously one of several chemical reactions that occurs once moisture reaches the bi-products of the resin's catalytic process. The osmosis part is more about moisture moving through small voids in the laminate through capillary action rather than osmotic action.

I was not sure that this whether it was possible that this was a cored hull so its good that you have eliminated coring as a possible cause.

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post #15 of 16 Old 09-14-2018
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Re: Fiberglass Hull Deformation - Severity?

Most of the applications of epoxy are done directly on the gell coat after a very short time. Application of epoxy should be carried only after removing gell coat, and real drying of the hull.
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Re: Fiberglass Hull Deformation - Severity?

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Originally Posted by celenoglu View Post
Most of the applications of epoxy are done directly on the gell coat after a very short time. Application of epoxy should be carried only after removing gell coat, and real drying of the hull.
Again I need to ask what the basis for your statement that "Most of the applications of epoxy are done directly on the gell coat after a very short time." It may occur that some people in some places apply an epoxy barrier coat directly over gelcoat without allowing the gelcoat to dry properly. But you have made a very strong statement here. Please provide a reliable source that supports your statement that "Most of the applications of epoxy are done directly on the gell coat after a very short time.", because that would seem to run counter to anything that I have ever seen or heard.

At least around here, I typically see one of four things, either 1) new boats with Vinylester gelcoat and a vinylester veilcoat, getting bottom paint applied directly to properly prepared gelcoat without an epoxy barrier coat since Vinylester acts effectively a barrier coat, 2) new boats without Vinylester gelcoat getting an epoxy barrier coat as new boats or coming from the factory with an epoxy barrier coat, 3)Older boats getting stripped of bottom paint and some of their gelcoat down to solid material, then being allowed to sit and dry for many months at a time, and only when the bottom has been tested with a moisture meter as being adequately dry, getting an epoxy barrier coat, or 4)Boats that already have an epoxy barrier coat, and are being stripped of bottom paint, getting a touch up of the existing barrier coat with a few coats of epoxy barrier coating only once the existing barrier coat tests as sufficiently dry.

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