Looking for advise on a trailerable weekender - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 38 Old 04-21-2009 Thread Starter
 
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Looking for advise on a trailerable weekender

Hi. I am new to sailing and this is my first post on this forum. I have been researching for years and recently bought a DVD, "Basic Sailing Skills," that finally convinced me that I could take the plunge.

Here is my problem. I know nothing about boats, but I am stuck trying to buy one. I could use some advise.

I'm in Binghamton, NY and there aren't any sizeable lakes for about 60 miles (the finger lakes.) There is a small 3-mile lake nearby that I can use to practice, but we plan on spending most of our time on the finger lakes.

I have found a seemingly well kept Catalina 22, and several other pre-1986 Catalinas. There are also a few MacGregor Ventures that I haven't looked at. It's hard to find info on them, but I think that their 24' hull would be pushing the weight limit of my 2005 Chevy Colorado 4x4.

Can anybody offer advice or recommendations?

Last edited by electricc0wb0y; 04-21-2009 at 11:13 AM.
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post #2 of 38 Old 04-21-2009
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It would really help if you said which engine you have in your 2005 Colorado, as that affects the towing capacity considerably. It would also help if you said if it was an extended or regular cab version.

A Catalina 22 is a popular starter boat, but I think the Macgregor Venture 24 is a better boat. See the PS magazine review of the Catalina 22. The design weight is 2250 lbs., and the trailer is probably another 1000 lbs...so, you're probably looking at about 3500 lbs. with the trailer and gear. I don't know how heavy the V24 is, but as I recall, it is actually lighter than the C22.

Other boats in this size range include the Compacs and Precisions. Hunter also made a few small boats in this range.




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post #3 of 38 Old 04-21-2009
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How many people for sailing, and how many for camping? What kind of budget? Finger Lakes are fun, laid-back sailing but their peculiarities do help define boat choices. Summer winds are generally light and variable, and storms don't amount to much. A lighter boat will be easier to tow, launch, and maneuver. Water ballasted boats are somewhat tender, which can be off-putting to new sailors, but they are light for their length when towing.

Summer winds often come from the south or southwest; the Finger Lakes run due N-S, up to 40 miles long but often under one mile wide. You'll want a boat that points decently, because there are days you'll need to beat upwind for hours. This is easier if your boat can hold a high sailing angle. Catboats and full/shoal keelers point less well than fin keelers or even many swing keel boats. Fixed keels can be problematic in the shallow, muddy coves; a retractable keel is useful, but it may take up cabin room.

Cat22 is always a good choice, tho a little heavy for its size. It'll still move just fine for you and is reassuringly steady. Boats by S2, San Juan, Precision, or Sirius would be good places to start. More modern (roomy) water-ballasted boats include the Hunters and MacGregors.

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post #4 of 38 Old 04-21-2009 Thread Starter
 
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It's the i5 crew cab. 5300lbs GVWR, about 9000lbs for truck+trailer. I have read that they truck is about 4200lbs. (Truck fuel, 2 passengers, and tongue weight will be pushing it.)

Is sailing a cutter significantly more complicated than a sloop? I believe all the Ventures that I had two jibs.
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post #5 of 38 Old 04-21-2009 Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
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How many people for sailing.
There will usually be just two of us. Camping will always be just two of us, and I doubt that we will ever make trips longer than one or two nights. On occasion, we may take on a couple of guests for the day.

Your experience with the finger lakes is great. I really love the pictures of the Sirius 21, but they are hard to find. Catalina 22's are easy to find. Parts and help are always readily available. I should also mention that my job may move me next winter, so versatility is also a plus.

Also, my limit for the boat, trailer, and payload is about 3500-4000lbs. It will have to be love at first sight for me to spend more than $10k, and I would like to save some of that to personalize her.
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post #6 of 38 Old 04-21-2009 Thread Starter
 
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Here is another question: Is there a big hassle buying a boat in Canada and trailering her over the border? (Other than needing a passport after June 1.)
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post #7 of 38 Old 04-21-2009
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With the Canadian dollar dropping all the time you may get lucky and find a good deal in Canada with your US $$. You would have to check with US customs for import complications if there are any. A truck with a class 3 tow capability (3500-5000 lbs) will get you by just fine. I have a MacGregor 26M that tops out at about 4200 lbs when fully loaded with gear, provisions, gas, engine and trailer which I tow with an extended wheelbase Chevy Traiblazer I-6 engine. It may be worth looking at a MacGregor powersailer for the finger lakes in the event that you find yourself in a situation where the return trip is against a headwind all the way back - a 50hp on the stern will get you back to the ramp with ease. MacGregors use water ballast and they are easy to tow and very versatile with good resale ability.
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post #8 of 38 Old 04-21-2009
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Smile Trailerable sailboats and headroom

In my wayward youth the lust of sailing led to an old Venture 17 on a trailer with flat tires in a backyard. Much like the car restorer's " Barn car", it was lovingly rebuilt, repainted, re fiitted, and was an easy tow behind a regular car and Toyota pickup. Easy to Launch (with a tongue extension), swing centerboard and powered by a J.C. Higgins 2 stroke 5 HP. there was not alot of expense to operate. However, it was spartan with only sitting headroom, a V berth and two arguable quarter berths. The direct plumbed marine head was just beneath the companionway bridgedeck covered by a step, so you had to be very close friends with your crew to use it underway.

The Sail plan was simple main and working jib so it was difficult to overpower under sail and if you did, all you needed to do was uncleat the mainsheet to put her on her feet. Kind of like dinghy sailing with a covered cuddy.

Moved up to a MacGregor 25 which was towable by a Ford Bronco II with v-6 and an Izusu Trooper V6 and provided Pop Top head room and a porta potty head compartment. Again, no slip fees with the trailer parked on the driveway and a Honda 7.5 OB (with charger for Running lights).

Neither of these boats offered adequate storage for ground tackle, adequate water and cooking facilities, or sea kindly handling on anything other than protected waters. Good to learn what you don't know and you can "skin your knees" without much repercussion, because they're not that heavy nor will you exceed hull speed unless you're in a hurricane. More danger on lakes from powerboaters who don't know what or how a sailboat works.
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post #9 of 38 Old 04-21-2009 Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptKermie View Post
With the Canadian dollar dropping all the time you may get lucky and find a good deal in Canada with your US $$. It may be worth looking at a MacGregor powersailer for the finger lakes in the event that you find yourself in a situation where the return trip is against a headwind all the way back - a 50hp on the stern will get you back to the ramp with ease.
That was my original plan, but a while ago I got in a bicycling accident downhill at about 25mph. Now I have absolutely no desire for a 50hp motor other than getting home in bad wind. From what I understand, a strong 4-stroke should get me efficiently at hull-speed. A decent hybrid Mac is also slightly outside my price range.
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post #10 of 38 Old 04-21-2009 Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
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Good to learn what you don't know and you can "skin your knees" without much repercussion, because they're not that heavy nor will you exceed hull speed unless you're in a hurricane.
That is exactly what I'm looking for. I someday hope to move to a larger body of water, but I would like to learn (and enjoy) right now.
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