Review Your Own Boat - Page 3 - SailNet Community
Boat Reviews This forum has all types of boat reviews. Take a look, Dream, Agree, Dissagree.... but enjoy.

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post #21 of 44 Old 01-10-2020 Thread Starter
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Re: Review Your Own Boat

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Originally Posted by SailingUphill View Post
I know this is difficult to say, but the topic actually exists here:
https://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-reviews/

It is a whole forum dedicated to folks reviewing their boats. Hell I posted several pages worth of modifications to my last boat there, and my last, last boat there.

That's not to say that the forum doesn't need new life and all, or a "summary" thread. But there are topics for forums other than "General Discussion (sailing related" on this board.
thanks... this thread places reviews in the same thread... Some of the threads don't really have complete reviews.

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post #22 of 44 Old 01-10-2020
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Re: Review Your Own Boat

Great

I moved the thread to the Boat Reviews sub-forum so it can be forum in the far distant future


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post #23 of 44 Old 01-10-2020
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Re: Review Your Own Boat

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Originally Posted by bristol299bob View Post
Bristol 29.9

likes:
  • Skeg hung rudder - supports and protects the rudder.
  • Prop in aperture - protects the prop and offers some resistance to snagging crap pots, etc.
  • easy access to chain plates for inspection and replacement.
  • good engine access especially considering her size
  • Beautiful - I love her classic lines beautiful warm interior
  • Solid, quiet - The interior is all hand built mahogany, tabbed to the hull. it's all well made, lovey and sturdy. It's hard to explain the comfort I gets when coming off watch, going down below to a quiet restful place. I've been on so many boats that creak squeak and grind in a seaway making it hard to get rest.
  • Lead encapsulated keel - I prefer this to a bolt on keel
  • large chart table
  • well balanced under sail, tracks well and has a light touch on the wheel.
  • bulkhead mounted table with leaf. In the smaller configuration it does not block access to any part of the boat. However if the leaf is opened it will block access to the head and v berth
  • fast - for an old, fat, heavy boat. We have won our share of PHRF races.
  • Storage - well thought out and quite a lot for a small boat.

Dislikes:
  • Poor side deck drainage - Water flowing down the side decks will not drain overboard fast enough and overflows onto the cockpit seats! It soaks your ass and feet. Not so bad in the summer, but damned annoying in the cool weather.
  • Anchor locker is shallow. you need to be deliberate when stowing rode so that it does not bunch up.
  • Butcher-block Formica in the galley and chart table. It's "so 70's"
  • Chart table has no fiddles (I'll address that this summer)
  • Chart table uses the quarter berth for a seat. I dislike this layout very much. It makes access to the quarter berth awkward either as a berth or as storage. And makes sitting at the chart table uncomfortable.
  • The head is a tight squeeze - it's narrow and tucked up against the mast.
  • not fast - to old, fat and heavy. We have not won enough PHRF races!
  • Storage - I guess there is really never enough storage :-)
This about nails it.

I'll have to evaluate it carefully this spring, but I think if the cockpit carlins are removed and bedded with butyl tape, that will prevent water ingress to the cockpit. Also, there is a chain locker forward of and below the v-birth that requires installation of a hawse pipe on deck to utilize it, a must for all chain rode.

Another positive IMO is the very large and deep starboard cockpit locker. The inner wall is removable allowing really good engine access. Maintenance work is a snap.
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post #24 of 44 Old 01-10-2020
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Re: Review Your Own Boat

I'll do a boat review of the C&C 32 probably later this year. Gotta get a new mainsail, fix the baby stay adjustment, fix a couple hatches and get some more miles sailing in all kinds of weather.

Freedom, a 1983 C&C 32 sailing Smith Mountain Lake, VA
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post #25 of 44 Old 01-10-2020
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Re: Review Your Own Boat

Outbounds have evolved since their inception. Each one is different. When some one comes up with a real improvement it’s incorporated into the stock base boat. So a review is only applicable to a given boat beyond the hull, appendages and deck. Will try to focus mainly on that.
Thinks I like.
It’s manners is a seaway. Carl got it right. She has a lovely ride even in the snot. Helm remains light, no pounding of note close hauled, and surfs under control. Cockpit is fairly dry even with boarding seas.
She’s forgiving of mild to moderate mistakes in trim with little fall in vmg and even being over canvassed.
The details are thought out to make a strong durable passagemaker. Bob Perry has pointed out on this site in the past that a properly designed balanced spade rudder is as strong if not stronger then skeg hung. The outbound rudder post is massive. Internal support is higher then the waterline and there are multiple bearings. All to often the rudder is holding the skeg on not the other way around as the narrow junction of the skeg to the canoe body is hard to engineer correctly. The Outbound gives you a sense of security. Also like the massive ss rod steering linkage. Bulletproof and once set up no maintenance as there’s no cables, blocks, bike chain etc.
Although some don’t like internal ballast I don’t like failure of the bolts or supports or canoe body resulting in keels falling off. The massive structure of the internally ballasted ( with pb not fe) bulbed fin keel is in my judgment the best compromise for a long distance cruiser. Hear of sister ships having hard and soft groundings without structural damages.
There are multiple ingenious solutions to common problems. All wiring is labeled. Seachest to eliminate unnecessary thru hulls. All lifting segments of sole secured. All components first rate.
We opted for a two head version, slab reefing brought back, Dutchman, an extra removable dyneema stay for the storm jib, reenforancements for the jsd, spectr watermaker, northern ligh genset, AC, Webasto. Think those things and the lay out makes for the ideal mom and pop liveaboard. I’ve been on bigger and smaller boats and of all of them this one has been the easiest to live on.
There’s only three steps down the companionway. Seems like a small thing but when’s it rocky like that and having bulkheads on both sides of me.
I opted for standard 6 1/2’ draft. Shoal is 5 1/2’. Think there’s places where centerboarders or cats can get into and I can’t. But don’t think that foot makes that much of a difference as to the number of places I’m restricted from. Do think an additional foot or two matters much more. So happy with the draft.
Given nature of the design boat has an amazing carrying capacity without effecting performance to a noticeable degree.
Previously have had several full keel boats. This boat tracks better and I can back up under control.

s/v Hippocampus
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post #26 of 44 Old 01-11-2020 Thread Starter
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Re: Review Your Own Boat

Out

"Seachest to eliminate unnecessary thru hulls."

Whatsa seachest?

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post #27 of 44 Old 01-11-2020
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Re: Review Your Own Boat

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Originally Posted by SanderO View Post
Out

"Seachest to eliminate unnecessary thru hulls."

Whatsa seachest?
Sea chest. One or two main thru-hulls flood an internal chest (think of it like a manifold), which then branches off to all the systems that require sea water.


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post #28 of 44 Old 01-11-2020 Thread Starter
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Re: Review Your Own Boat

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Sea chest. One or two main thru-hulls flood an internal chest (think of it like a manifold), which then branches off to all the systems that require sea water.
Why not use Ys and have two valves on one seacock? or more Ys and more valves as needed?

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post #29 of 44 Old 01-11-2020
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Re: Review Your Own Boat

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Originally Posted by SanderO View Post
Why not use Ys and have two valves on one seacock? or more Ys and more valves as needed?
Similar concept. However, this can be a single hull penetration for many more raw water needs.

The downside to a sea chest is typically more hose running around the boat, which can fail. If it does, you'll need valves coming out of the sea chest, or you have to shut off everything feeding on that seachest. I've seen sea chests that are permanently exposed to the sea and only have valves coming out of it. I've also seen a major thru hull feeding a sea chest, with many outlets. I like the former.

My boat has a dozen penetrations below the waterline. Two dozen, if you include those at the waterline. Ugh.


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Last edited by Minnewaska; 01-11-2020 at 07:58 AM.
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post #30 of 44 Old 01-11-2020 Thread Starter
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Re: Review Your Own Boat

One you penetrate hull with a large seacock... you can "branch off" with plumbing to as many items which need raw water. I would not use this for head effluent probably.

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