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post #861 of 1896 Old 06-25-2016
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Re: 2016 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

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This is one of my Top 5 favorite Chesapeake anchorages
What are the other four?
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Re: 2016 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

We got Dad out one more time for an afternoon sail/drift/motor-cruise before he flies out on Monday. If we saw 5 knots we were lucky. Sigh. Out of MYC, Rock Creek, Patapsco, and hung a right to get into the Bay in a futile search for breeze.

But the weather was beautiful - the air was cool enough and it was very comfortable on the water, even if we couldn't just sail. I have yet to just sail. Seriously hoping there's something between "almost no wind" and "TORNADO!" LOL.

We enjoyed some snacks including Korean sushi as we'd hit up Lotte Plaza on Rte 40 so Dad could buy out all the Asian foods he can't find in Dubuque. A bit homesick for Hawaii I think. Our youngest monitored the VHF again, followed our progress on the laptop, and came out more on deck to check things out. He's getting used to it - even asked us to go on another 3-hour tour! The big kids are starting to learn how this boat works as opposed to the J-22s and Sonars. New to them: self-tailing winches and the roller furling jib. Not that those were tough lessons!

I noted water again on the counter around the galley faucet - I have not used the water system in a week so I'm wondering what is going on. Hopefully this week we'll get the bilge pump and water pressure issues dealt with, and investigate a potential new panel for the LPG system.

We finally got to use the pool at MYC - it was fun to swim there with the kids and hopefully we'll meet some other people with kids soon (there were some there but our timing was off as we got in, then the lifeguard blew the whistle for a 10 minute break, and all the other people who were there left).

I may get to go racing next Wednesday - not on our boat but another one which offered me a ride. I hope there's going to be some wind!


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This is one of my Top 5 favorite Chesapeake anchorages
What are the other four?
if he'd told ya..he'd have to kill ya..
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Re: 2016 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Well, since the last time I visited here, I've sailed and motored to Cape Charles, VA and back, a distance of 417 miles in 7 days. About half the trip was under sail and excellent speeds, the remainder of the voyage involved motor sailing. The Final 50 miles, however, was motoring only.

I had three friends with me, all of which have varying degrees of sailing experience ranging from instructor to small lake sailing. Ironically, the ones with the most experience were somewhat of a headache at times. They tended to be backseat drivers when it came to navigation, ignored my local knowledge when we encountered a major storm and demanded that I do things that I knew were wrong (which I did not do).

Day one, a Friday, began a lot later than I wanted, mainly because the crew brought so much gear and food that it took more than an hour to load it all on the boat. The oldest crew member brought a bushel of fruit, apples, oranges, pears, peaches, tangerines, bananas. He also brought 24 small bottles of wine, a couple large bottles of wine, and several 2X2 foot square plastic boxes about 8 inches thick that contained other foods.

Another was told to bring a single bag of clothing, which he did, a bag large enough to hold a body. It was immense and weighed about 80 pounds. He brought other bags as well. After stowing all the gear, we motored out of the marina, pointed the bow south and the predicted NW wind of 5 to 10 MPH was 10 to 15 from the SW - right on our nose. Consequently, we motored the 6 miles down the Havre de Grace channel to Sandy Point, put up the sails and spent the next 10 hours tacking, arriving at our anchorage behind Dobson Island about 8:30 p.m.. Dinner was late, but fortunately, the weather was cool and sleep came easily.

The following day kicked off with breakfast at 8 a.m., after which I fired up the engine and headed for Fairwinds Marina near the mouth of the Magothy River, a location where I frequently gassed up in the past. First thing I noticed was there were no gas pumps at the end of the dock, which is where they were last fall. The new owners decided to move the gas pumps next to the launch ramp so they would be close to the store and more convenient for the person working the store. Problem is, the location is very, very tight, nearly impossible to get into with 33-foot boat and the depths are just 4 feet, which puts me scraping the bottom. I felt a bit like Houdini getting the boat in position to gas up, and everyone at the marina couldn't believe I managed to squeeze into that tiny space. Dumb luck prevailed.

After gassing up, I eased out of the Magothy, the wind was still southwest, blowing about 10 at most, and the boating traffic was such near the bay bridge that conflicting wakes made sailing damned near impossible. Consequently, we motor-sailed for the next 10 miles, then shut off the engine and sailed all the way to the mouth of the Patuxent River, went into Solomons and anchored up for the night, arriving just before dark. Another long day. The crew cooked and ate supper on the way, which made for an easier evening. Soon after we arrived, a monster thunderstorm hit the area, but we were anchored up in an area sheltered from winds from all directions and didn't have any problems.

Sunday morning came early, breakfast at 7 a.m., then it was off to the fuel dock where a beautiful, young lady helped us tie up and handed my the diesel hose. When I told her "No, I want gasoline." She said, "What do you mean, this is a sailboat, you need diesel." When I explained that I have a gasoline engine, she said this was the first sailboat she ever saw that had a gasoline engine. Nice gal, though. We also picked up three bags of ice for the three cooler chests the crew brought along to hold all the additional food. Though we planned to be gone for two weeks, there was enough food for two months aboard the boat, and then they wanted to eat out in some restaurants.

For the first time, the wind was in our favor and we sailed on 10 to 15 MPH NW winds south toward the mouth of the Rappahannock River. We intended to meet up with an old friend that day at Locklie's Marina, but just after passing Point Lookout, my phone rang and he said that he could not meet with us because of some medical issues with his wife. Consequently, we opted to anchor up in Little Bay, which is on the north side of the Rappahannock peninsula, a tiny bay that is fairly well sheltered from all directions but northeast. By that time, the wind had died completely, so the sails were dropped and we motored toward our destination. As we entered the Little Bay we encountered a few pound nets, and unfortunately, I opted to pass on the wrong side of one, which by the chart showed 13 feet of water, but in reality was less than 2 feet deep, all hard sand. The boat stopped dead in it's tracks and was hard aground. I did my best to extract us, but to no avail. The crew climbed onto the cabin on the port side, grabbed the shrouds and tried to make the boat lean, but that wasn't gonna happen with the Morgan. It won't heel more than 5 degrees in a 20 knot wind beam reach. Fortunately, the hard, ebbing tide washed the sand out from under the keel and the boat began to drift towards deeper water. In a few minutes, I fired up the engine, motored close to the pound net stakes, which I knew would be in deeper water, and made my way to the anchorage a few hundred yards away. It was a quiet night, but the winds came up from the southwest at about 20 to 25 around midnight and whistled through the rigging, keeping me semi-awake through much of the night.

After a hearty breakfast of sausage, scrambled eggs tex-mex style, English muffin, orange juice and coffee, we were on our way. As soon as I passed Stingray Point, the winds became a bit more westerly and we sailed all the way to Cape Charles, where I then fired up the engine, dropped the sails and motored into the Cape Charles City Marina, a beautiful, relatively new facility that charges $2 a foot for transient dockage including water and electricity. There's a very nice restaurant on the premises, where the crew quickly headed for supper. I opted to take a hot shower, and eat aboard the boat in air conditioned comfort. That AC felt really good that night and drowned out the roar of the loudly snoring crew. (Yes, all three of them snored very loudly, which made sleeping damned near impossible.)

Next morning, NOAA called for SW winds of 5 to 7 knots, which was a joke. The actual winds were SW at 15 to 20 and gusting to 25, therefore, I opted not to head for the bridge tunnel and Kiptopeke or Norfolk. Additionally, two of the crew members informed me that they had things they had to do on Saturday, which blew the cruise plan all to Hell. One had a house to look at, while the other had a dinner engagement. WTF! So, the best laid plans..., were quickly changed and I raised the sails and pointed the bow north for Tangier Island.

About 15 miles out from Tangier the western sky began to look bad. Weather radar on one of the crew's cell phones revealed a nasty cell headed in our general direction and the wind began picking up, so I dropped the main, fired up the engine and motor sailed on the jib toward out destination at 7.5 to 8 mph. The wind was such that I figured it would be best to enter Tangier via the east channel. We were two miles south of the channel when the storm passed just above us, slamming up with 40 to 50 mph winds from the back side of the storm, which did their best to try to drive me into the shallows. When the #1 day marker came into view, we were pummeled with rain and high winds, making visibility quite limited, and that's when one of the crew became frightened and insisted that I head for another green marker out in Tangier Sound. I told him that was not the entrance marker, but instead, a main Tangier Sound channel marker. Unfortunately, he and another crew member were looking at the chart, which is a large scale in this area. I had been through the Tangier Island's East Channel a dozen times in a powerboat and knew where I was going. I got mad, told them that I was right and to be quiet and let me do my job, which was to keep everyone safe. 20 minutes later, we motored down the narrow channel, made a right turn and pulled into a slip at Park's Marina.

As I docked the boat, the tide was roaring out, which anyone that has been here knows really roars. Consequently, I had to dock bow first, which I rarely do. The temperature seemed to be near 100 degrees and the humidity was horrendous. The rain had stopped, but the flies and mosquitoes soon took over. Thank goodness for the AC. The crew once again went ashore for supper and ice cream, while the captain opted to stay aboard, pop a TV dinner in the microwave and sip a Margaretta.

Next morning, the wind was a bit whacky, but that's nothing new for this time of year. There were a few storms on the radar, but probably wouldn't arrive until late that night, so we headed north, hoping to reach Solomons before they arrived. Most of the day was spent motor sailing because of the winds, and we entered the creek at 8 p.m. at Solomons. The crew decided it would be a good night for fillet mignon, which they grilled on the boat's kettle grill, and served them with sauteed onions, sweet potatoes, and steamed broccoli, which they wolfed down. I opted for Ravioli, which I ate an hour before they sat down to eat. I cannot eat that late at night without getting acid re-flux.

After another big breakfast at 8 a.m., we arrived at the fuel dock about 9 and gassed up. The winds were blowing about 10 mph SW when I exited the Patuxent River's mouth and headed north, hoping to make Fairlee Creek by sundown. Knowing my son would be there, I called him and discovered that there had been no dredging over the winter and the channel had silted in even more since my last visit, which meant I had to continue up to Worten Creek instead. As we motor sailed north, large thunderstorms passed both north and south of us, and another began to form just west of Baltimore just after I passed beneath the Bay Bridge at Sandy Point - not a good sign. Fortunately, we had a favorable tide and motor sailed at about 7 mph most of the way and as that storm entered Baltimore, it fell apart, leaving just light showers and gentle winds.

After a bit of deliberation, I decided to continue to Perryville just after passing the mouth of Fairlee Creek, which turned out to be the right decision. A few more, small thunderstorms materialized, but they passed either north or south of us during the night and I arrived at the dock at exactly 3 a.m., fired up the AC and dove into vee berth. At 5 a.m. I heard music playing on one of the crew's cell phones, which was the time he had set his alarm for. I closed my eyes and went back to sleep. When I awoke at 8:30 a.m., two of the crew had already packed their gear and left. The remaining crew member rode to the marina with me in my car, so he had to stick around and help me unload our gear.

The following day, Saturday, I returned to the boat to clean up the mess, a chore that took the better part of 5 hours and I still have to clean the cockpit cushions, which I will do later today. When I got home Friday afternoon, I took a hot shower, hit the sheets and didn't wake up until 10 a.m. Saturday morning. Next week, after the 4th or July holidays settle down, I'm headed south again, this time maybe I can convince my wife to go, but if not, I'll just go alone - I kind of like it better that way.

I would have posted a You Tube link and photo bucket link of the trip, but because of the recent screw ups with the site, I had to re-register and cannot post links until I have 10 new posts. Sorry guys and gals.

Gary
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Re: 2016 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Well, I got my 10 posts in, so lets see if I can add some stuff. (fingers crossed)




Gary
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Re: 2016 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

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Originally Posted by scratchee View Post
What are the other four?
Dunn Cove off Harris Creek on the Choptank
Granary Creek off Wye or Shaw Bay of Wye
Fishing Creek off the Piankatank
Meyer cove off Cororatan River of the Rappahonack


A now I have to kill you😀😀😀😄😄


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Re: 2016 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

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Well, since the last time I visited here, I've sailed and motored to Cape Charles, VA and back, a distance of 417 miles in 7 days. About half the trip was under sail and excellent speeds, the remainder of the voyage involved motor sailing. The Final 50 miles, however, was motoring only.

I had three friends with me, all of which have varying degrees of sailing experience ranging from instructor to small lake sailing. Ironically, the ones with the most experience were somewhat of a headache at times. They tended to be backseat drivers when it came to navigation, ignored my local knowledge when we encountered a major storm and demanded that I do things that I knew were wrong (which I did not do).

Day one, a Friday, began a lot later than I wanted, mainly because the crew brought so much gear and food that it took more than an hour to load it all on the boat. The oldest crew member brought a bushel of fruit, apples, oranges, pears, peaches, tangerines, bananas. He also brought 24 small bottles of wine, a couple large bottles of wine, and several 2X2 foot square plastic boxes about 8 inches thick that contained other foods.

Another was told to bring a single bag of clothing, which he did, a bag large enough to hold a body. It was immense and weighed about 80 pounds. He brought other bags as well. After stowing all the gear, we motored out of the marina, pointed the bow south and the predicted NW wind of 5 to 10 MPH was 10 to 15 from the SW - right on our nose. Consequently, we motored the 6 miles down the Havre de Grace channel to Sandy Point, put up the sails and spent the next 10 hours tacking, arriving at our anchorage behind Dobson Island about 8:30 p.m.. Dinner was late, but fortunately, the weather was cool and sleep came easily.

The following day kicked off with breakfast at 8 a.m., after which I fired up the engine and headed for Fairwinds Marina near the mouth of the Magothy River, a location where I frequently gassed up in the past. First thing I noticed was there were no gas pumps at the end of the dock, which is where they were last fall. The new owners decided to move the gas pumps next to the launch ramp so they would be close to the store and more convenient for the person working the store. Problem is, the location is very, very tight, nearly impossible to get into with 33-foot boat and the depths are just 4 feet, which puts me scraping the bottom. I felt a bit like Houdini getting the boat in position to gas up, and everyone at the marina couldn't believe I managed to squeeze into that tiny space. Dumb luck prevailed.

After gassing up, I eased out of the Magothy, the wind was still southwest, blowing about 10 at most, and the boating traffic was such near the bay bridge that conflicting wakes made sailing damned near impossible. Consequently, we motor-sailed for the next 10 miles, then shut off the engine and sailed all the way to the mouth of the Patuxent River, went into Solomons and anchored up for the night, arriving just before dark. Another long day. The crew cooked and ate supper on the way, which made for an easier evening. Soon after we arrived, a monster thunderstorm hit the area, but we were anchored up in an area sheltered from winds from all directions and didn't have any problems.

Sunday morning came early, breakfast at 7 a.m., then it was off to the fuel dock where a beautiful, young lady helped us tie up and handed my the diesel hose. When I told her "No, I want gasoline." She said, "What do you mean, this is a sailboat, you need diesel." When I explained that I have a gasoline engine, she said this was the first sailboat she ever saw that had a gasoline engine. Nice gal, though. We also picked up three bags of ice for the three cooler chests the crew brought along to hold all the additional food. Though we planned to be gone for two weeks, there was enough food for two months aboard the boat, and then they wanted to eat out in some restaurants.

For the first time, the wind was in our favor and we sailed on 10 to 15 MPH NW winds south toward the mouth of the Rappahannock River. We intended to meet up with an old friend that day at Locklie's Marina, but just after passing Point Lookout, my phone rang and he said that he could not meet with us because of some medical issues with his wife. Consequently, we opted to anchor up in Little Bay, which is on the north side of the Rappahannock peninsula, a tiny bay that is fairly well sheltered from all directions but northeast. By that time, the wind had died completely, so the sails were dropped and we motored toward our destination. As we entered the Little Bay we encountered a few pound nets, and unfortunately, I opted to pass on the wrong side of one, which by the chart showed 13 feet of water, but in reality was less than 2 feet deep, all hard sand. The boat stopped dead in it's tracks and was hard aground. I did my best to extract us, but to no avail. The crew climbed onto the cabin on the port side, grabbed the shrouds and tried to make the boat lean, but that wasn't gonna happen with the Morgan. It won't heel more than 5 degrees in a 20 knot wind beam reach. Fortunately, the hard, ebbing tide washed the sand out from under the keel and the boat began to drift towards deeper water. In a few minutes, I fired up the engine, motored close to the pound net stakes, which I knew would be in deeper water, and made my way to the anchorage a few hundred yards away. It was a quiet night, but the winds came up from the southwest at about 20 to 25 around midnight and whistled through the rigging, keeping me semi-awake through much of the night.

After a hearty breakfast of sausage, scrambled eggs tex-mex style, English muffin, orange juice and coffee, we were on our way. As soon as I passed Stingray Point, the winds became a bit more westerly and we sailed all the way to Cape Charles, where I then fired up the engine, dropped the sails and motored into the Cape Charles City Marina, a beautiful, relatively new facility that charges $2 a foot for transient dockage including water and electricity. There's a very nice restaurant on the premises, where the crew quickly headed for supper. I opted to take a hot shower, and eat aboard the boat in air conditioned comfort. That AC felt really good that night and drowned out the roar of the loudly snoring crew. (Yes, all three of them snored very loudly, which made sleeping damned near impossible.)

Next morning, NOAA called for SW winds of 5 to 7 knots, which was a joke. The actual winds were SW at 15 to 20 and gusting to 25, therefore, I opted not to head for the bridge tunnel and Kiptopeke or Norfolk. Additionally, two of the crew members informed me that they had things they had to do on Saturday, which blew the cruise plan all to Hell. One had a house to look at, while the other had a dinner engagement. WTF! So, the best laid plans..., were quickly changed and I raised the sails and pointed the bow north for Tangier Island.

About 15 miles out from Tangier the western sky began to look bad. Weather radar on one of the crew's cell phones revealed a nasty cell headed in our general direction and the wind began picking up, so I dropped the main, fired up the engine and motor sailed on the jib toward out destination at 7.5 to 8 mph. The wind was such that I figured it would be best to enter Tangier via the east channel. We were two miles south of the channel when the storm passed just above us, slamming up with 40 to 50 mph winds from the back side of the storm, which did their best to try to drive me into the shallows. When the #1 day marker came into view, we were pummeled with rain and high winds, making visibility quite limited, and that's when one of the crew became frightened and insisted that I head for another green marker out in Tangier Sound. I told him that was not the entrance marker, but instead, a main Tangier Sound channel marker. Unfortunately, he and another crew member were looking at the chart, which is a large scale in this area. I had been through the Tangier Island's East Channel a dozen times in a powerboat and knew where I was going. I got mad, told them that I was right and to be quiet and let me do my job, which was to keep everyone safe. 20 minutes later, we motored down the narrow channel, made a right turn and pulled into a slip at Park's Marina.

As I docked the boat, the tide was roaring out, which anyone that has been here knows really roars. Consequently, I had to dock bow first, which I rarely do. The temperature seemed to be near 100 degrees and the humidity was horrendous. The rain had stopped, but the flies and mosquitoes soon took over. Thank goodness for the AC. The crew once again went ashore for supper and ice cream, while the captain opted to stay aboard, pop a TV dinner in the microwave and sip a Margaretta.

Next morning, the wind was a bit whacky, but that's nothing new for this time of year. There were a few storms on the radar, but probably wouldn't arrive until late that night, so we headed north, hoping to reach Solomons before they arrived. Most of the day was spent motor sailing because of the winds, and we entered the creek at 8 p.m. at Solomons. The crew decided it would be a good night for fillet mignon, which they grilled on the boat's kettle grill, and served them with sauteed onions, sweet potatoes, and steamed broccoli, which they wolfed down. I opted for Ravioli, which I ate an hour before they sat down to eat. I cannot eat that late at night without getting acid re-flux.

After another big breakfast at 8 a.m., we arrived at the fuel dock about 9 and gassed up. The winds were blowing about 10 mph SW when I exited the Patuxent River's mouth and headed north, hoping to make Fairlee Creek by sundown. Knowing my son would be there, I called him and discovered that there had been no dredging over the winter and the channel had silted in even more since my last visit, which meant I had to continue up to Worten Creek instead. As we motor sailed north, large thunderstorms passed both north and south of us, and another began to form just west of Baltimore just after I passed beneath the Bay Bridge at Sandy Point - not a good sign. Fortunately, we had a favorable tide and motor sailed at about 7 mph most of the way and as that storm entered Baltimore, it fell apart, leaving just light showers and gentle winds.

After a bit of deliberation, I decided to continue to Perryville just after passing the mouth of Fairlee Creek, which turned out to be the right decision. A few more, small thunderstorms materialized, but they passed either north or south of us during the night and I arrived at the dock at exactly 3 a.m., fired up the AC and dove into vee berth. At 5 a.m. I heard music playing on one of the crew's cell phones, which was the time he had set his alarm for. I closed my eyes and went back to sleep. When I awoke at 8:30 a.m., two of the crew had already packed their gear and left. The remaining crew member rode to the marina with me in my car, so he had to stick around and help me unload our gear.

The following day, Saturday, I returned to the boat to clean up the mess, a chore that took the better part of 5 hours and I still have to clean the cockpit cushions, which I will do later today. When I got home Friday afternoon, I took a hot shower, hit the sheets and didn't wake up until 10 a.m. Saturday morning. Next week, after the 4th or July holidays settle down, I'm headed south again, this time maybe I can convince my wife to go, but if not, I'll just go alone - I kind of like it better that way.

I would have posted a You Tube link and photo bucket link of the trip, but because of the recent screw ups with the site, I had to re-register and cannot post links until I have 10 new posts. Sorry guys and gals.

Gary
Great story Gary....lessons learned lol


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Re: 2016 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

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Originally Posted by punahougirl84 View Post
We got Dad out one more time for an afternoon sail/drift/motor-cruise before he flies out on Monday. If we saw 5 knots we were lucky. Sigh. Out of MYC, Rock Creek, Patapsco, and hung a right to get into the Bay in a futile search for breeze.

But the weather was beautiful - the air was cool enough and it was very comfortable on the water, even if we couldn't just sail. I have yet to just sail. Seriously hoping there's something between "almost no wind" and "TORNADO!" LOL.

We enjoyed some snacks including Korean sushi as we'd hit up Lotte Plaza on Rte 40 so Dad could buy out all the Asian foods he can't find in Dubuque. A bit homesick for Hawaii I think. Our youngest monitored the VHF again, followed our progress on the laptop, and came out more on deck to check things out. He's getting used to it - even asked us to go on another 3-hour tour! The big kids are starting to learn how this boat works as opposed to the J-22s and Sonars. New to them: self-tailing winches and the roller furling jib. Not that those were tough lessons!

I noted water again on the counter around the galley faucet - I have not used the water system in a week so I'm wondering what is going on. Hopefully this week we'll get the bilge pump and water pressure issues dealt with, and investigate a potential new panel for the LPG system.

We finally got to use the pool at MYC - it was fun to swim there with the kids and hopefully we'll meet some other people with kids soon (there were some there but our timing was off as we got in, then the lifeguard blew the whistle for a 10 minute break, and all the other people who were there left).

I may get to go racing next Wednesday - not on our boat but another one which offered me a ride. I hope there's going to be some wind!
We found wind yesterday to sail from Annapolis some of the way up the chester. Today different story...Lake Chesapeake

After moving our boat south of the bridge we have noticed more wind here , but today was no go so we became Powerboat Haleakula and motored home from Cacaway.

Met some friends who left MYC and had dinner at BBQ joint on Richie Hiway which was just average.

Looking forward to the 4th and three days. May do Solomon's or the Choptank and go to LaTrappe Creek. Anyone been there?
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Re: 2016 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

I took a young, family friend cruising this weekend. He's 11.
I gave him plenty of wheel time, designated him as the "Navigator" and set him up at the chart table with the iPad chart plotter. I gave him the pilot berth to sleep in, which he loved.

The cruise was a club event that was a casual race from the club to the destination, Whitehall Bay. He liked the racing part. I'm glad he had a good time, because it was a trying weekend for me.

1. I haven't parented a young kid in a long time, let alone been responsible for someone else's kid in today's extremely litigious climate.

2. Unbeknownst to me, the backup footpump for the fresh water system had a large split in the body due to not being properly winterized. As a result, I lost about half of my fresh water supply into the bilge. Luckily, we retained enough water to get through the weekend.

3. While pumping out the holding tank at Holiday Hill Marina, an impatient powerboater accelerated into me and carved a nice, 6 inch gouge into my gelcoat. His response? "That scratch was already there!"

Lessons learned:

1. Hell is other people.

2. Never ever, ever go to the fuel dock or pump out on a summer weekend. Go during the week, or call the Honey Dipper boat to pump you out.

Fourth of July weekend? I'm going far south, away from the madness that is Annapolis, fireworks and powerboats.

Alacrity, 1981 Tartan 33 #168
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Re: 2016 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Ajax, my very expensive rub rail was severely damaged by a powerboater while I was fueling up at Tidewater Marina in Havre de Grace on a busy weekend. He hit me with a huge wake that slammed me against the fuel dock pilings and damaged the rub rail in several places. I called NRP, gave them his boat name and number, but as usual, they did absolutely nothing. When I called NRP to follow up, they said they would get back to me by the end of the week. I never heard from them again.

My rub rail is a hard-rubber bumpe that will cost more than $2,000 to replace and that's just for the material. I made some temporary repairs, but sometime in the near future, it will have to be replaced.

Gary
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