2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake - Page 22 - SailNet Community
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post #211 of 520 Old 06-17-2019
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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Been sailing out of Norfolk for several years, but first time posting on this thread. We sailed from Norfolk Saturday morning to Cape Charles and spent the night at the town docks. Had a wonderful sail across on Saturday and arrived in time to enjoy the beach and the town. The trip home was more boisterous then expected as the wind stayed at 15-20 knots out of the South West the whole way home (when we planned the trip, forecast looked more like it would be in the 10-15 knot range). We sailed west across the bay for a few hours and then decided we would like to be home before dark so dropped the sails and turned on the engine. The decks got a good washing from the waves and spray, but made it home safe and sound. Beautiful weather and a great trip!
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post #212 of 520 Old 06-17-2019
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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

I'm still puzzling over the surprisingly harsh sea state yesterday, in 15 kt winds that were brisk but not terribly strong. We've been in stronger winds before without nearly as much spray over the bow. Then it occurred to me that SSW winds open up about 25 nm of fetch:



Due south or SSE winds get some protection in the lee of Kent Island.
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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

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Originally Posted by oldlaxer1 View Post
Hip surgery went exceptionally well. I'm probably at 90-95% now. (was probably 35-40% before surgery). Boat is clean, prepped, and we're ready for some overnighting. See you all on the water!
This is such good news!
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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Living vicariously from all your posts. I've been laid up with a medical issue: no sailng, no flying so I can't even get to the boat. Marina is being very good about the fact that we had two air conditioners delivered just before my medical emergency and they are sitting in the lounge. Why two? Ask Home Depot, I ordered one, they delivered two. Go figure.
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post #215 of 520 Old 06-17-2019
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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Saturday I sailed in CHESSS's (https://www.chbaysss.org/) first Challenge of this season, Thomas Point to St. Michael's. What a wonderful day to be on the water - there were very few boats out, add 4 hours or so of lively sailing and you a have perfect day on the water. One point of sail from Thomas Point Light House to Bloody Point, up Eastern Bay to Tilghman Point once again no tacking required, rounded Tilghman Point to Hambleton Point, you guessed it - no tacking required. Once past Hambleton Point some of the singlehanders (me) decided to drop their sails to make it easier to negotiate the heavy power boat traffic near St Michael's.

After rafting up we walked around the museum admiring the classic boats then had a beer or two followed by dinner with the group. After dinner it was back to the raft-up to move our boats to separate anchorages for the night. Once securely anchored it was time for a hot shower, a glass of Port, and a wonderful night's sleep.

Sunday brought an early breakfast followed by a leisurely sail back to Herring Bay. Then home in time for dinner with the family.
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post #216 of 520 Old 06-17-2019
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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

4Arch, That sounds a lot like our experience this weekend. We had departed Castle Harbor for the Rhode River on Saturday. The same route West as you, once at Love Point. It was brisk...but the sea state combined with the close hauled, and beam, reaches made it a washing machine below deck. My poor wife was attempting to make lunch...and did...but WOW..was bad in our rather stable 31 footer.
It's one thing to be working...or have a planned long term route...but for a weekend pleasure cruise it was a no-go. As we neared the old lighthouse on the North side of the Bay Bridge..we tucked in tight and turned North for the Magothy. What a pleasure it was to hoist the Jib and chill the motor and go with the flow. We anchored behind Dobbins with 5 other, larger, sailboats for the night. In retrospect. that was not the best choice for calm waters. It was, however, a good choice for a Fresh breeze in the v berth...a nice trade off. Our Spade held firm..And had dug pretty deep. Another boat dragged twice that night. I am going to have to explore deeper into the Magothy.
On Sunday morning we headed out through the channel and ran into the same thing. It was about 9:30. Most of the boats were on the south side...but..there was one 18 ftr smack dab in the middle. Now I try to be respectful...do I stay away from his fishing lines off the stern or the anchor line off of the bow???? The anchor line will hurt me more...the fishing lines him...sheesh.
Anyway...once through...we headed Due East easily for the Chester..I thought that that was the end of it...Near the east end of the bridge we got hit so hard on the beam that we almost instantly went over to 30 degrees..
To make the short of the long...it's good to have been out, and it's good to be home.
Patrick
S/V Keiko
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post #217 of 520 Old 06-17-2019
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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Just saw your chart post..That is Exactly where we got Nailed on Saturday heading West. The next day we got "Hit" once further East..but still within the flow through the bridge span

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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

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Originally Posted by TakeFive View Post
We got out for our first sail of the season this weekend. The plan was to sail to Magothy River Saturday, spend the night on the hook, then head to Annapolis today and back to Rock Hall Monday.

Provisioning for our first time this season took longer than expected, with multiple stops needed before making the 2 hour drive to Rock Hall. We did not leave the slip until 1700. This was my first time backing out of our slip with my new folding prop (which performs very will in forward, but has less thrust in reverse than my old fixed prop). It also has virtually no prop walk, which is overall a good thing, but my slip positioning and exit strategy has always taken advantage of prop walk. Despite my nervousness over this and over the firm 15 kt SSW breeze right through the marina, exiting the slip was uneventful.

Once underway, we had a close reach to Magothy in brisk conditions of about 15 kt. We made good time with reefed main and genoa furled a couple of wraps. Sea state was very lumpy. Helm balance was a little off with a little more weather helm than I wanted, but I didn't want to let the genoa out further to keep heeling down. We arrived at the mouth of Magothy River 1900 hours, anchored, had dinner (grilled chicken in our secret marinade, bean salad, pasta salad, watermelon, and my birthday cake), watched a couple of our favorite episodes of The Office, then retired for the night. Our anchor held well at 5:1 scope in 15 ft of water, with our anchor alarm showing us not moving more than one meter at any time.

My sleep was disturbed a few times during the night by a slight bumping noise that sounded like a fender or mooring buoy tapping against the hull, but since the anchor alarm was fine I didn't bother to check. At dawn I got curious, so went forward to discover the issue. My nylon anchor rode goes through my bow roller to a cleat inside the aft end of my anchor locker. It's about 4' from the roller to the locker, and with the solid breeze that we had overnight, there was enough stretch in that 4' to cause the roller to rotate ever so slightly back and forth. The slight motion caused a "ticking" noise which was easily eliminated with a couple shots of WD40 onto the roller's axle bolt. Although I know that nylon tri-strand is known for its stretch, I was surprised that a 4' length would stretch enough to move the roller.

We departed for Annapolis 0830 and motor-sailed to the Magothy inlet. We left the reef in, but unfurled the genoa completely. We shut off the motor and sailed through the Magothy channel, dodging multiple fishing boats that were anchored right in the channel. Sailing was great once past Persimmon Point, and we were close-hauled in hopes of making it to the Bay Bridge on one tack, and maybe getting to the mouth of the Severn River on a second tack. But once we got to the middle of the Bay, out of the lee of Sandy Point, the sea state got rather crazy, apparently due to the long fetch of the southerly wind. Wind speed wasn't terrible, but we were just relentlessly pounding into 3' chop, with occasional 4 footers. We took water over the bow at one point, and drenched the cockpit through the open dodger. I wanted to close the dodger, but wasn't going to go forward in those conditions. About a minute later we got another drenching in the cockpit, and decided to head for home on a broad reach. It was amazing how the same sea state was so much more comfortable going in the other direction! I was surprised by the sea state, since it was worse than I would have expected from the relatively modest winds.

We could have found another place to go to, but with strong thunderstorms forecast starting around 1500 and dead air and more thunderstorms forecast for Monday we decided to leave alternate destinations for another time. We puttered around the boat and took naps in the afternoon. The forecast storms came through at 8, with strong enough lightning that it chased us off the boat and into our car to enjoy the show on the way home.
Many times that stretch from the Magothy to th Bridge has its own “weather”. You have a narrowing of the Bay so both wind and water move more quickly. Is the only place where wind opposite current has a larger effect as there is actual current there. That’s some of what you Possibly experienced a little of. We Tavel through the Bridge a lot. Many times it’s a real dishwasher for a mile on the northern side.

Glad you guys got out.


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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

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Originally Posted by PatMc57 View Post
4Arch, That sounds a lot like our experience this weekend. We had departed Castle Harbor for the Rhode River on Saturday. The same route West as you, once at Love Point. It was brisk...but the sea state combined with the close hauled, and beam, reaches made it a washing machine below deck. My poor wife was attempting to make lunch...and did...but WOW..was bad in our rather stable 31 footer.
It's one thing to be working...or have a planned long term route...but for a weekend pleasure cruise it was a no-go. As we neared the old lighthouse on the North side of the Bay Bridge..we tucked in tight and turned North for the Magothy. What a pleasure it was to hoist the Jib and chill the motor and go with the flow. We anchored behind Dobbins with 5 other, larger, sailboats for the night. In retrospect. that was not the best choice for calm waters. It was, however, a good choice for a Fresh breeze in the v berth...a nice trade off. Our Spade held firm..And had dug pretty deep. Another boat dragged twice that night. I am going to have to explore deeper into the Magothy.
On Sunday morning we headed out through the channel and ran into the same thing. It was about 9:30. Most of the boats were on the south side...but..there was one 18 ftr smack dab in the middle. Now I try to be respectful...do I stay away from his fishing lines off the stern or the anchor line off of the bow???? The anchor line will hurt me more...the fishing lines him...sheesh.
Anyway...once through...we headed Due East easily for the Chester..I thought that that was the end of it...Near the east end of the bridge we got hit so hard on the beam that we almost instantly went over to 30 degrees..
To make the short of the long...it's good to have been out, and it's good to be home.
Patrick
S/V Keiko
Check out Eagles Nest, and if crowded go through to the mooring field behind Gibson and anchor on the periphery. Always a good breeze here as you can see the Bay. Sometimes the snobs will give you a look though.

I don’t like Dobbins as the PB wakes get you.

You also have Cornfield Creek if your draft will handle it

Another great spot is Broad Creek . It’s a great hidey hole in fall when the strong NW winds come through as the hill protects the Cove. Anchor far in from the glass house so you won’t be beefed by river wakes or noise.

Further in the Magothy is hot in the summer and crowded/ noisy.
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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

That chute you experienced below the Bridge is one of the reasons we keep our boat in Whitehall. It’s also why the racers choose it to race in that area. There is often much better wind there than in more open parts of the Bay, especially north of the Bridge.

Learning to reef down so you aren’t overpowered is good. I especially like to reef the headsail so it doesn’t pull the bow down and we get doused.

The current playing through the Bridge area though only 1-1.5 knots has a lot to do with the sea state there. It’s a narrowing chute though. If you have to fight the wind , it challenging. If you are with it...it can be a fast sleigh ride.

Some of the fastest speeds I have hit on Haleakula are through the Bridge area on a broad reach. Both north and south.

On our recent trip to the LI Sound when we sailed on the Sound there is always a 1-2 knot current. A 15 knot breeze with the current was easy peasy. That same 15 knots when the current switched 6 hours later posed a different seas state.

One of the features I like on our new Doyle 135 is that there are marks on the foot of the sail which I can see in the cockpit when it’s down to a 120 and a 110. I have found them helpful to have a metric to reef with. Haleakula a mast head sloop acts better reefing from the jib before the main. Every boat is different. You have to experiment to figure it out.


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