2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake - Page 29 - SailNet Community
 192Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #281 of 520 Old 07-03-2019 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
chef2sail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 10,532
Thanks: 95
Thanked 200 Times in 192 Posts
Rep Power: 13
 
Send a message via AIM to chef2sail
Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Quote:
Originally Posted by arf145 View Post
I agree it's irresponsible to not put some kind of notice up on their site if the service is down. As it is, one can easily start chasing nonexistent radio problems.

Not sure i would call it a hazard as I don’t see any harm or danger in it not working

It sure is a bad look for Sea Tow to have so much publicity about a free service they are not making available. It’s advertised in all magazines and internet

If that is the only way you check if the radio is working, that’s lame

It’s very easy to use the VHF to call a marina , vessel or even a Sea Tow Vessel to ask how the are reading you. Even Sea tow automated system couldn’t do that when it worked.

In fact if you are exorcized that it’s not working call call the Sea Tow Boats on the water on the VHF. Tell them they advertise a free service and since it’s not working you and all you friends will be checking in with them till it starts working again����������������������


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
___________________________
S/V Haleakala (Hawaiian for" House of the Sun")
C&C 35 MKIII Hull # 76
Parkville, Maryland
(photos by Joe McCary)
Charter member of the Chesapeake Lion posse

Our blog-
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


“Sailing is just the bottom line, like adding up the score in bridge. My real interest is in the tremendous game of life.”- Dennis Conner

Last edited by chef2sail; 07-03-2019 at 12:34 AM.
chef2sail is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #282 of 520 Old 07-07-2019
Senior Member
 
TakeFive's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Swarthmore, PA
Posts: 5,007
Thanks: 24
Thanked 144 Times in 133 Posts
Rep Power: 11
 
Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Family commitments prevented us from heading to the boat together as originally planned on Saturday. Instead we did some required things around the house and I headed to the boat alone after dinner, with a list of in-slip todo items.

First up was a complete overnight shock of our water system (2 tanks plus hot water heater), since we were seeing some evidence of fouling, especially in the hot water tank (where temperatures probably accelerate any bio activity). As soon as the Chlorox was loaded, I was chased to shore by some wicked looking storm activity. I was hearing about large hail coming, so I took my fragile aluminum Prius to a nearby self-serve car wash to wait it out under cover.

Once back at the boat, I pulled the lazy ends of my main halyard and mainsheet down into the air conditioned salon and stitched on my new replacements (NER VPC hybrid halyard and Novatech XLE mainsheet, which I know is a little stretchy, but I really like the feel of it) to the ends while watching some Netflix shows in the comfort of air conditioning.

Come daylight, I pulled the new lines through while pumping out the chlorine water. I ran the motor and spun the prop in the slip for a half hour, set up a new smaller US flag, scrubbed the cockpit and spot cleaned the foredeck, jumped in the pool to cool off, and headed home.

There were a lot of transients in the marina for the holiday weekend, but very few of the seasonal tenants, presumably because of the muggy weather. Air conditioning was a definite plus.

I’m heading to Milwaukee for my job this week (stuck on the tarmac now with nothing to do but ramble on and on about this), and a funeral on Saturday will kill my sailing plans, but I’m hoping for good enough weather Sunday to justify taking next Monday off.

Rick S., Swarthmore, PA
USCG Certified Captain, OUPV and 50 Ton Master
ASA Certified 101/103/104/105/106



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

2001 Catalina 34MkII Tall Rig Wing Keel Breakin' Away, Universal Diesel M35B, Mantus 35 lb. anchor, sailing out of Rock Hall Landing Marina
TakeFive is offline  
post #283 of 520 Old 07-08-2019
Senior Member
 
travlin-easy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Maryland - USA
Posts: 6,609
Thanks: 1
Thanked 130 Times in 109 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Tomorrow, if the weather cooperates, and everything goes well, I hope to stop at the local grocery store, pick up some TV dinners, some canned goods, bring some breakfast stuff from home, stock the pantry, then stop at the local liquor locker and pick up a case of bottled water, a case of beer, a couple half gallons of Jim Bean Honey Bourbon, a couple bags of ice, load it onto the boat about noon, fire up the A4, point the bow south, raise the sails and head south. I ain't dead yet, but one Hell of a lot closer than I want to be.

With luck, I should be in Mill Creek by Tuesday afternoon and meet up with my friend MarioG, who is a forum member. We will drink to old times, then on Wednesday morning, I'll head for Solomons and hook up with a charter fishing captain friend, maybe catch something for supper, and head for Point Lookout the following morning and meet with another charter fishing captain that I have known for 40 years. We hope to catch some Spanish mackerel off Smith Point, which is a 50/50 shot, depending on the weather.

Friday seems like a good day to visit with another old friend at the Oyster House Restaurant in the Rappahannock, where I hope to spend the night before heading to Chrisfield to meet with an old Maryland state trooper friend that is also a charter fishing captain - we will do something, even if it's wrong. At the very least we will drink a few beers and relive old memories when we were both wearing a badge.

If the weather permits, I hope to head south to Cape Charles and meet up with a couple old friends that are charter fishing captains there, catch some weakfish and tautog for supper, spend the night at the new marina, and maybe try some new food at the restaurant there. Cape Charles has really changed over the past 20 years since I first visited here. How I wish there were still oyster rocks to pluck those wonderful, very salty oysters from.

Depending on the weather, I just may swing over the CBBT and out into the ocean, then up the coast to Ship Shoal Inlet, spend the night with the greenies, then head for Chincoteague Inlet, spend the night, go to OC, spend another night, then to Cape Henlopin spend the night there, then ascend Delaware Bay to Reedy Island before heading through the C&D Canal and back to the marina.

If the weather doesn't cooperate, I'll just do a 180 and head up the bay for home, which is just over 250 miles to the north. What the Hell, I'm not dead yet.

I constantly monitor channel 16 and 13 while underway so if any of you sailnetters want to raft up for a glass of Jim Bean or a Coors Light, give Saturday's Child a call.

All the best,

Gary
oldlaxer1 likes this.
travlin-easy is offline  
 
post #284 of 520 Old 07-08-2019 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
chef2sail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 10,532
Thanks: 95
Thanked 200 Times in 192 Posts
Rep Power: 13
 
Send a message via AIM to chef2sail
Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Quote:
Originally Posted by travlin-easy View Post
Tomorrow, if the weather cooperates, and everything goes well, I hope to stop at the local grocery store, pick up some TV dinners, some canned goods, bring some breakfast stuff from home, stock the pantry, then stop at the local liquor locker and pick up a case of bottled water, a case of beer, a couple half gallons of Jim Bean Honey Bourbon, a couple bags of ice, load it onto the boat about noon, fire up the A4, point the bow south, raise the sails and head south. I ain't dead yet, but one Hell of a lot closer than I want to be.

With luck, I should be in Mill Creek by Tuesday afternoon and meet up with my friend MarioG, who is a forum member. We will drink to old times, then on Wednesday morning, I'll head for Solomons and hook up with a charter fishing captain friend, maybe catch something for supper, and head for Point Lookout the following morning and meet with another charter fishing captain that I have known for 40 years. We hope to catch some Spanish mackerel off Smith Point, which is a 50/50 shot, depending on the weather.

Friday seems like a good day to visit with another old friend at the Oyster House Restaurant in the Rappahannock, where I hope to spend the night before heading to Chrisfield to meet with an old Maryland state trooper friend that is also a charter fishing captain - we will do something, even if it's wrong. At the very least we will drink a few beers and relive old memories when we were both wearing a badge.

If the weather permits, I hope to head south to Cape Charles and meet up with a couple old friends that are charter fishing captains there, catch some weakfish and tautog for supper, spend the night at the new marina, and maybe try some new food at the restaurant there. Cape Charles has really changed over the past 20 years since I first visited here. How I wish there were still oyster rocks to pluck those wonderful, very salty oysters from.

Depending on the weather, I just may swing over the CBBT and out into the ocean, then up the coast to Ship Shoal Inlet, spend the night with the greenies, then head for Chincoteague Inlet, spend the night, go to OC, spend another night, then to Cape Henlopin spend the night there, then ascend Delaware Bay to Reedy Island before heading through the C&D Canal and back to the marina.

If the weather doesn't cooperate, I'll just do a 180 and head up the bay for home, which is just over 250 miles to the north. What the Hell, I'm not dead yet.

I constantly monitor channel 16 and 13 while underway so if any of you sailnetters want to raft up for a glass of Jim Bean or a Coors Light, give Saturday's Child a call.

All the best,

Gary
Good to see you buddy. JeffH and I were talking about you( good of course) the other week. Have fun and good fishing. Lots of Dolphins spotted on the Bay from Hart Miller to Bloody Point ( we saw a pod last week)


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
___________________________
S/V Haleakala (Hawaiian for" House of the Sun")
C&C 35 MKIII Hull # 76
Parkville, Maryland
(photos by Joe McCary)
Charter member of the Chesapeake Lion posse

Our blog-
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


“Sailing is just the bottom line, like adding up the score in bridge. My real interest is in the tremendous game of life.”- Dennis Conner
chef2sail is online now  
post #285 of 520 Old 07-08-2019
Trailer Sailer Moderator
 
Rezz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 270
Thanks: 4
Thanked 8 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Howdy, y'all!

Life gets in the way of the fun stuff sometimes. At least I've been able to do some work on the boat in the meantime. I've taken off two weeks from work and am in the middle of that time right now.

I've completed one major project: recoring some rotten areas on the hull. I had four trouble spots that were soft and spongy, and luckily only one of them had rotten wood. On the rest of them, the fiberglass sole (cockpit, foredeck, and companionway step) just bowed up from the plywood underneath. I'm not sure how that happened, but those areas are now filled with penetrating epoxy to prevent any issues down the road. I guess if the wood rots anyway, I'll have to tear it out and do the job later with new wood, fiberglass, epoxy and gelcoat.

Two other projects are in progress. The first is redoing all the nonskid on deck. So far I'm about halfway done - I'm grinding down the old nonskid that's molded in and turned all slick. The repainting seems to be going well with some TotalBoat nonskid.

The second is stripping, sanding, and painting the underside of the deck, aka the ceiling belowdecks. I didn't realize how much effort it takes to lie on your back and paint without dripping into your eye or hair. Michelangelo, I don't envy the job you did on that chapel!

Left to do: I bought a new faux teak, aka foam with adhesive backing, to create a nice cabin sole. The carpet currently in place slides and can be a safety hazard. Basically, if my wife slips and hurts herself, she may kill me! I also need to redrill and remount all the stanchions, bow pulpit, and new cleats. I've replaced most of the running rigging and associated hardware on deck as well - so I should be good for almost anything once I'm done. I have four days off two weeks from now, and come hell or high water, I'm hoping to get out for at least three of those days.

I'll try to keep up on the chatter here - maybe I can see some of y'all on the water!
Rhapsody-NS27 likes this.

~ Rezz

S/v DreamWeaver
1980 Laguna Windrose 22
Rezz is offline  
post #286 of 520 Old 07-09-2019
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 172
Thanks: 7
Thanked 10 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

I had a pretty good long fourth of July weekend out on the boat for once not single handing the entire time.

Left out of Dahlgren July 4th and ended the day tucked up in Lewisetta where I was treated to a pretty good 360 degree fireworks show put on by the local waterfront home owners. Good show!

Had a short day on the 5th coasting down to Reedville where I picked up one of the younger engineers I work with who I am pretty sure thinks "boat" is just a description of 4 door sedans. Spend the night anchored out just by the nicely restored fish stink stack since the dock at crazy crab was being treated to the fish stink from the current fish stink stack.


Stack at Reedville.

Left out on the 6th heading across the bay to Tangier Island. Nothing too much to mention other than the fact it was a dead downwind sail and with following seas creating a nice corkscrewing motion that did not sit well with my passenger. He spent much of the crossing green and wishing for death. He was surprised and pleased to find that once the boat stopped reeling about he quickly recovered and enjoyed the somewhat weird but neat Tangier Island.


My coworker at the helm of East Wind while I prepare lines heading over towards Parks Marina

Stayed overnight at Parks Marina which was a hoot in spite of the fact we took a good bit of well meaning abuse from Mr Parks about not being able to make it into a slip that was a foot shallower than my keel in the tidal currents. It was pretty obvious that he was a little confused and a helpful local pointed out a slip that had enough draft and we slithered right in and spent the rest of the day walking around the island and having a good time.

My crewman was concerned about seasickness on the return trip for obvious reasons but instead was treated to fine weather and smooth sailing back to Reedville with the only hang up being some confusion caused my my Maretron compass deciding to go out of calibration and constantly claim that we were pointed 20 degrees to port which then goofed up all the other math on the electronics. No matter, I caught it right away since I was manually plotting as well and used it as a teaching opportunity.

Dropped my buddy off at Reedville and headed around the point and started up the river towards home.

Finished up the trip the next day doing the old "drive the riding lawnmower to the liquor store" routine hammering my way up the Potomac on the diesel in the still morning air. Wind kicked up making up for the calm morning with a vengeance and before long I was finishing the trip cruising along reefed down making great speed.

All in all a good time.
chef2sail, MarkofSeaLife and Rezz like this.
Aswayze is offline  
post #287 of 520 Old 07-11-2019
Senior Member
 
travlin-easy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Maryland - USA
Posts: 6,609
Thanks: 1
Thanked 130 Times in 109 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

I'm back home, although there were times when I thought I wasn't going to make it home ever again.

Monday started out beautifully, sailed 40 miles on just the jib sail down to Worton Creek where I anchored up and spent the night. Although it was very hot and humid, I have a Honda 2001i portable generator on the boat, which allows me to run the AC/heat pump and the generator is very quiet, comparatively speaking,

After a quick breakfast the following morning, I motored out of the creek, put up the sails and pointed the bow south, though there was not a lot of wind to work with so it took most of the day just to travel 29 miles to my next destination, a small creek just north of Annapolis, Maryland where a friend of mine works during the summer months. Most of the evening was spent drinking Honey Bourbon, talking about old times and how much fun we had on the trip the Florida Keys and Dry Tortugas back in 2012. Since then, he and his wife have divorced, he has a girlfriend that is half his age, but not sure how this is going to work out.

I fired up the engine and motored out of Mill Creek at 6:30 a.m. and listened to the marine weather forecast, which called for winds from the southwest at just 5 to 10 mph. Unfortunately, the marine weather forecast is about as reliable as predicting anything else in life - it's a crap shoot at best. I managed to sail about 30 miles farther south, tacking most of the way, and about noon the wind began to pick up. "Great, I thought, at least I should have some wind to sail on today." Well, those 5 to 10 mph winds increased to 25 to 30 with some higher gusts.

Well, it wouldn't been so bad if I had someone along with me to help manage the sails, but as usual, I was sailing single handed. The wave heights gradually increased to 4 to 5 feet, spray was constantly coming over the bow, and the pressure on the sails and helm was considerable. Then, just as I was coming around to change my tack angle, a rogue wave of about 8 to 10 feet hit me broadside, threw me out of the helm seat, sent the boom flying to the opposite side of the boat, and for a few minutes, I thought I had broken my arm. (Turns out to just a bad sprain of my right elbow. My left elbow, somehow, go a pretty nasty gash in it, though I didn't realize this until I saw blood on the cockpit deck.

I covered my wounds with sterile gauze, turned the boat around and headed for home, which was 142 miles away. It was a lot easier ride with following seas, and while underway, I called my friends to let them know I'm not going to see them. They understood, said maybe I should just drive down, which only takes a couple hours at most,go out to a local seafood restaurant, then I could be back home that night, sleeping in my own bed. Makes perfectly good sense to this old fart.

I was behind the helm on the return trip for nearly 17 hours, arrived at the marina at 3 a.m., hooked up the AC power, fired up the AC, took some pain pills and quickly fell asleep at the dock. I woke up at 8 when my wife called, worrying why I didn't answer the phone - I turned it off so I could sleep,

This morning, I made a conscientious decision that this was the end of my sailing days. I'll be 79 in October, if I make it that far, and I have come to the realization that I no longer can do the things I did back in 2012 when I was in much better physical condition. Too damned many body parts are just plain shot to Hell!

The boat is up for sale again, Carol is happy about that, and to be perfectly honest, I guess I am as well.

I'll post some vids and photos later this evening when I retrieve my phone from the car.

Sorry about the rant, but I thought this short story would be amusing to some of the forum members.

All the best,

Gary
travlin-easy is offline  
post #288 of 520 Old 07-11-2019
Trailer Sailer Moderator
 
Rezz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 270
Thanks: 4
Thanked 8 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Glad you made it home, Gary. Sorry your sailing adventures are ending with such a rough ride.

Looking forward to seeing pics of your sail, and best of luck on the sale.

~ Rezz

S/v DreamWeaver
1980 Laguna Windrose 22
Rezz is offline  
post #289 of 520 Old 07-11-2019 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
chef2sail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 10,532
Thanks: 95
Thanked 200 Times in 192 Posts
Rep Power: 13
 
Send a message via AIM to chef2sail
Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Quote:
Originally Posted by travlin-easy View Post
I'm back home, although there were times when I thought I wasn't going to make it home ever again.

Monday started out beautifully, sailed 40 miles on just the jib sail down to Worton Creek where I anchored up and spent the night. Although it was very hot and humid, I have a Honda 2001i portable generator on the boat, which allows me to run the AC/heat pump and the generator is very quiet, comparatively speaking,

After a quick breakfast the following morning, I motored out of the creek, put up the sails and pointed the bow south, though there was not a lot of wind to work with so it took most of the day just to travel 29 miles to my next destination, a small creek just north of Annapolis, Maryland where a friend of mine works during the summer months. Most of the evening was spent drinking Honey Bourbon, talking about old times and how much fun we had on the trip the Florida Keys and Dry Tortugas back in 2012. Since then, he and his wife have divorced, he has a girlfriend that is half his age, but not sure how this is going to work out.

I fired up the engine and motored out of Mill Creek at 6:30 a.m. and listened to the marine weather forecast, which called for winds from the southwest at just 5 to 10 mph. Unfortunately, the marine weather forecast is about as reliable as predicting anything else in life - it's a crap shoot at best. I managed to sail about 30 miles farther south, tacking most of the way, and about noon the wind began to pick up. "Great, I thought, at least I should have some wind to sail on today." Well, those 5 to 10 mph winds increased to 25 to 30 with some higher gusts.

Well, it wouldn't been so bad if I had someone along with me to help manage the sails, but as usual, I was sailing single handed. The wave heights gradually increased to 4 to 5 feet, spray was constantly coming over the bow, and the pressure on the sails and helm was considerable. Then, just as I was coming around to change my tack angle, a rogue wave of about 8 to 10 feet hit me broadside, threw me out of the helm seat, sent the boom flying to the opposite side of the boat, and for a few minutes, I thought I had broken my arm. (Turns out to just a bad sprain of my right elbow. My left elbow, somehow, go a pretty nasty gash in it, though I didn't realize this until I saw blood on the cockpit deck.

I covered my wounds with sterile gauze, turned the boat around and headed for home, which was 142 miles away. It was a lot easier ride with following seas, and while underway, I called my friends to let them know I'm not going to see them. They understood, said maybe I should just drive down, which only takes a couple hours at most,go out to a local seafood restaurant, then I could be back home that night, sleeping in my own bed. Makes perfectly good sense to this old fart.

I was behind the helm on the return trip for nearly 17 hours, arrived at the marina at 3 a.m., hooked up the AC power, fired up the AC, took some pain pills and quickly fell asleep at the dock. I woke up at 8 when my wife called, worrying why I didn't answer the phone - I turned it off so I could sleep,

This morning, I made a conscientious decision that this was the end of my sailing days. I'll be 79 in October, if I make it that far, and I have come to the realization that I no longer can do the things I did back in 2012 when I was in much better physical condition. Too damned many body parts are just plain shot to Hell!

The boat is up for sale again, Carol is happy about that, and to be perfectly honest, I guess I am as well.

I'll post some vids and photos later this evening when I retrieve my phone from the car.

Sorry about the rant, but I thought this short story would be amusing to some of the forum members.

All the best,

Gary
Geeze Louise Gary,

Least you are all right. I only hope I make 79 on Haleakula.
Time for another phase of your life enjoying Carole😉


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
___________________________
S/V Haleakala (Hawaiian for" House of the Sun")
C&C 35 MKIII Hull # 76
Parkville, Maryland
(photos by Joe McCary)
Charter member of the Chesapeake Lion posse

Our blog-
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


“Sailing is just the bottom line, like adding up the score in bridge. My real interest is in the tremendous game of life.”- Dennis Conner
chef2sail is online now  
post #290 of 520 Old 07-11-2019 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
chef2sail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 10,532
Thanks: 95
Thanked 200 Times in 192 Posts
Rep Power: 13
 
Send a message via AIM to chef2sail
Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Looks like a nice weekend though forecasted winds may be light for some. It looks like it will be warm, but not unbearably hot.

We are headed out after I put a half day in at work, will meet my wife at Haleakula at noon. Should be underway by 1. If we go north then the Chester is Saturday’s destination. If we go south then the Choptank is Saturday destination. Nice to have choices.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
___________________________
S/V Haleakala (Hawaiian for" House of the Sun")
C&C 35 MKIII Hull # 76
Parkville, Maryland
(photos by Joe McCary)
Charter member of the Chesapeake Lion posse

Our blog-
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


“Sailing is just the bottom line, like adding up the score in bridge. My real interest is in the tremendous game of life.”- Dennis Conner
chef2sail is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 2 (1 members and 1 guests)
Phil6
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
World’s First 3D Printed Sailboat Hull Ready for Mini Transat Ocean Race 2019 - All 3 NewsReader News Feeds 0 12-24-2018 01:50 AM
2019 Boat of the Year Specifications and Key Sailboat Comparison Metrics - Cruising W NewsReader News Feeds 1 12-13-2018 08:48 AM
2019 Budget includes request to shutdown WWV and WWVH Rhapsody-NS27 News Feeds 11 08-23-2018 01:26 PM
Sailing season? What sailing season? Moonfish22 General Discussion (sailing related) 0 02-16-2009 05:56 AM
Is the Chesapeake sailing season beginning? teshannon Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 41 12-23-2007 01:44 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome