2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake - Page 37 - SailNet Community
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post #361 of 520 Old 08-26-2019
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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Was out over the weekend up near Worton Creek and Saturday night anchored on the outside and the water was like a mill pond all night, had a great sunset and very cool night.

For a forecast of 10 knots it was much more wind in the range of 14- 21 knots and very puffy. Quick sail back to Middle River and at least we had a broad reach.

We heard the call go out about the MOB and the confusion with coordinates and location of the boat, and unfortunately it seems like an all to often occurrence lately on the bay. Seems like it has been a season filled with these events. It floors me that people want to get on 16 and walk all over transmissions with trivial calls, need to keep off and let rescue people have a clear channel to do all that is possible to assist.

Jeff
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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

On another note, we drug anchor for the first time ever after getting a good set. I've had a few occasions when I couldn't get our Delta to set, but far more often the anchor has hooked and held us right where we set regardless of wind shifts.

Sunday AM though we almost went aground. The boat stayed put all night (fortunately) and was right were we left it when I came up for my morning coffee. It was cool in the cockpit so I went back below for breakfast and was just finishing my toast and second cup of coffee when I looked through the companionway and the trees seemed closer than they should. I jumped up and we were 100-150 yards from the boat we'd been anchored near.

I immediately jumped to the anchor and hollered for the Admiral to get the engine started. Fortunately the anchor was holding at that point so I was able to pull us from 1/2 boat length from being around out to maybe 3 boat lengths from aground but with near zero scope at that point. The Admiral did a great job getting us out of there and we went back to our original position and re anchored to enjoy the balance of the morning. It was just luck I noticed in time (over confidence leading to not setting the anchor alarm), so more lessons learned/relearned on this quick overnight. That said I was very proud that the entire recovery and re-anchoring required zero yelling/screaming and barely any words were exchanged. Almost all of our communication was via hand signals and my wife put the boat just were it needed to be, stopped it, let it settle back on the anchor, backed down and shut off, all without a word.

I noticed a tide line near us as we moved back to our spot and surmise the anchor held through the night and the 90 degree wind shift but when the incoming tide combined with the wind we started a slow drag. Fortunately the anchor held through the night as I said I was over confident and didn't set an anchor alarm and only got up to look around once over night.

PalmettoSailor
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post #363 of 520 Old 08-26-2019
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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

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On another note, we drug anchor for the first time ever after getting a good set. I've had a few occasions when I couldn't get our Delta to set, but far more often the anchor has hooked and held us right where we set regardless of wind shifts.

Sunday AM though we almost went aground. The boat stayed put all night (fortunately) and was right were we left it when I came up for my morning coffee. It was cool in the cockpit so I went back below for breakfast and was just finishing my toast and second cup of coffee when I looked through the companionway and the trees seemed closer than they should. I jumped up and we were 100-150 yards from the boat we'd been anchored near.

I immediately jumped to the anchor and hollered for the Admiral to get the engine started. Fortunately the anchor was holding at that point so I was able to pull us from 1/2 boat length from being around out to maybe 3 boat lengths from aground but with near zero scope at that point. The Admiral did a great job getting us out of there and we went back to our original position and re anchored to enjoy the balance of the morning. It was just luck I noticed in time (over confidence leading to not setting the anchor alarm), so more lessons learned/relearned on this quick overnight. That said I was very proud that the entire recovery and re-anchoring required zero yelling/screaming and barely any words were exchanged. Almost all of our communication was via hand signals and my wife put the boat just were it needed to be, stopped it, let it settle back on the anchor, backed down and shut off, all without a word.

I noticed a tide line near us as we moved back to our spot and surmise the anchor held through the night and the 90 degree wind shift but when the incoming tide combined with the wind we started a slow drag. Fortunately the anchor held through the night as I said I was over confident and didn't set an anchor alarm and only got up to look around once over night.
I feel for you as it is very unsettling that you were holding and then not, now it is a trust issue. Sounds like you handled it well and were fortunate to catch the movement.

Had a Delta Fastset 35lb and had the same thing happen to me although not sure of the reason, whether it drug or someone hooked my anchor.

Traveled up the Chester river to the Down Rigger festival and anchored off the town of Chestertown around some boats close to sunset. Was fine through the night and morning event in over 15 knots of breeze, and thought we were safe to dinghy into town. Went in and through town and down by Washington College dock, checked on the boat and she was right where we left her. Walked through town, got my fried oysters, some whisky and headed back to the dinghy dock only to not see our mast where it should be. Locate the boat right next to a trawler and someone on the bow.

Race back across boat races to get back as soon as possible and a person had let out more rode so I did not bump the trawler. Had to tie my main anchor to a fender and go down river and anchor using my backup Fortress and leave the wife on board, which didn't go over real well. Dinghy'd back over and had a really tough time pulling up the Delta anchor, 50 feet of chain and 150 feet of 5/8 rope. Shaken we just got all anchors on board and went to Reed Creek to have a restful night.

Not sure if it was a tide change, dragging, bad bottom (which it is) or someone hooked me and it reset. I know it has plowed in really bad mud before but had never let go like that. Needless to say the Admiral was not happy and we got a new Rocna 44 as soon as we got back. That has always held, for now...

Jeff

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post #364 of 520 Old 08-26-2019
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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

We went for a daysail yesterday. Absolutely beautiful day. The girls were having a lot of fun until they got seasick. The mouth of the Patapsco was like being in a washing machine but once we got back in the lee of North Point, things flattened out quite a bit. Wish we could have stayed out last night as today looks like another perfect sailing day. We’re planning on heading out for Labor Day weekend, but we’ll wait until later in the week for a better wind forecast to figure out where.

Also, I sincerely feel for victim and his loved ones in yesterday’s accident. It’s impossible to even imagine the anguish of the victim and the people aboard. However, with no disrespect to the victim (or any victim), I think it’s important to bring some perspective to those who might conclude boating deaths and accidents are a worsening problem. The national average fatalities per 100,000 registered recreational vessels has slowly been trending downward over the past 22 years. In Maryland we seem to average about 15 boating fatalities per year statewide with 2017 having been an outlier at a well below average 6. In 2018 it sadly went back up to 16 and this year we are at 14 so far (by my count based on news reports). 2017 having very few fatalities may contribute to a sense that things are worsening when in reality we’re returning to average.
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post #365 of 520 Old 08-26-2019
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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

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The coordinates they gave were exactly where the boat was anchored and the skipper on the radio claiming they were in South River when the distress skipper gave an accurate lat/long for his position and verbally stated Rhode River, only confused a horrible situation.

We were passing Rhode River Green mark (not sure the number but on the west side across from Red 4 and 6) under sail when we heard the initial Mayday. I realized we were within a 1/2 mile of the given lat long and immediately began scanning for the vessel in distress. I was the boat that repeatedly requested he fire a flare. In retrospect I should have asked him to sound his horn. Knowing he had to be close, we quickly started the engine rolled in the jib and made a 180 to head back towards the mouth of the river. As we did, the Anne Arundel Fireboat passed us, also heading to the junction of the Rhode and West Rivers. We then hear the distress skipper hailing that the Fireboat was passing them. At that point, I realized it was one of the boats anchored in the cove near the Rhode Green mark (now on our Starboard side) and they had been nearly abeam on Port when the first call came in.

We were the 2nd boat to find the distress boat (a Catamaran with a large crowd aboard) and standby. The Fireboat turned around and arrived about a minute or two after we did, so we backed off and and kept a look out for about an hour. I think there were 2 AA Fireboats, A Yellow boat I thought was Seatow but my wife says was the Annapolis Fireboat, a Coast Guard boat and a LEO boat that may have been State of MD or AA County, plus Trooper 8 Helicopter all participated in the "Search" such as it was.

The anguish of the people on that boat will be with me for quite some time.

https://www.eyeonannapolis.net/2019/...ing-from-boat/


There were probably 10 boats within a 1/2 mile of him and it took over 10 minutes before the first one recognized which boat had the issue.

Thanks for clearing this up and for your ability and willingness to lend assistance. I was not within visual range but heard the VHF broadcasts from the South River. From just the radio transmissions of the catamaran in distress, you could hear the anguish of the people in the background when the skipper keyed the mic. Such a sad outcome.

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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Bryan,

We are off for four days. Going to the Choptank Friday , and Saturday for sure. Will to come uo to the Wye or our new found spot Leeds Creek for a Sunday raft if you guys feel you can .

Yesterday’s sail back from Leeds Creek , on the Miles River was stupendous.
First we had the whole Creek to ourself. Great dinner of NY strips steaks, potato salad , grilled peaches

Debated reefing before we left after looking at the forecast . By 10 it was blowing steady 16 gusts to 22. Which is when we weighed anchor. We always set our anchor alarm, but in the last 10 years since we bought a New Zealand ROcna we have yet to drag.. in any real reversing current over 1.5 knots we slide a 10 lb mushroom anchor down the Rhode and use it as a Kellet to prevent anchor wrap. For those with lots of chain I hope you are using a snubber/ bridle .

We decided to forgo the main and furled the 135 to 115 ( we have marks on our new jib) and promptly took off like a bat out of hell. The Miles was a close tech. We dropped the centerboard and were doing well over 6.5 most of the way to Eastern Bay in one tack. We had a very broad reach, down Eastern Bay at 6 knots and rounded Bloddy Point and took off again. Back at the Barn in 4 hours . 3 tacks and 27.5 miles.

The nice thing about the Bay was the waves were no more than 2-3 ft. Intervals were over 7 seconds. They were in one direction except at the river ends, and the Bay was quite manageable.


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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

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Bryan,

We are off for four days. Going to the Choptank Friday , and Saturday for sure. Will to come uo to the Wye or our new found spot Leeds Creek for a Sunday raft if you guys feel you can.
Wye or Leeds could be a plan. Let’s keep an eye on wind and weather. We’ll definitely go around the long way (not through Kent Narrows) on Labor Day weekend.

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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Payback for not venturing out on Sunday because of too much wind and waves. 4 hours of motoring home.
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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Started planning for long weekend a bit late and of course most places are/will be packed. Heading up from Rappahannock to somewhere south of Potomac (either Great Wicomico or perhaps Little W), then crossing over to Smith. Does anyone have recent experience with Tylerton? I know there's not much there, which suits us fine. Just curious... I'm assuming we'll be fine given that we only draw less than 3.5'. And tips, great anchorages (in the odd chance ferry doc would be jam packed) or other comments welcome! Ditto for Wicomico(s) ;-)

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Re: 2019 Sailing Season on the Chesapeake

Don't know about Tylerton but Smith Island Marina in Ewell is nice & simple, and nearly right next to the "main" area- the (only) restaurant where the ferry people get their Smith Island cake. Also next to the (only) fuel dock, right by the (only) cell tower. I presume you know about the flies? Not sure what they're like this late in the season.
Channel was re-dredged a year or two ago, nominally to 7ft. Skinniest I saw was 5.5, in early May.

Last edited by sailnavy; 08-28-2019 at 07:53 PM.
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