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post #21 of 141 Old 03-04-2019
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

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Minni, I saw this when I lived down in the Caribe. It was mostly done by big sailing yachts with very large tenders and heavy OBs... I think they were crewed charter boats. That size yachts don't have davits. They may have a stern dinghy garage. It's not a bad idea to get the dink out of the water if you are going to not be using it for some time... But most people at anchor are using their dink from early AM to late in the evening after a night at a local watering hole.
Interesting thought about larger vessels. I suppose, if your topsides are close to the water, a rolley anchorage could knock the dink around. I've not measured, but will guesstimate that our topsides are 4-5 ft a mid-ship. Not sure if high enough. Generally would be.

I'm thinking of the practice as to whether it's easier than the davits to haul up overnight and launch in the morning. When I haul on the davits, it's a bit of a pain to clear our sugar scoop transom. Then, you can't just haul it clear of the water, I need to haul it to the top and attach the securing straps or it will swing back and forth mercilessly.

However, ever since I ditched the center console dinghy, in favor of an aluminum hull and tiller (much lighter and more interior room) I can easily do it myself. It's just time consuming. The mast halyard and bridle method would require two people, plus some method to keep from marring the topsides. One person on the winch and one on the side deck. I do pull it up this way, when storing the dink on the foredeck. However, it has no motor in those cases and I just pull it up by the bow.


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post #22 of 141 Old 03-04-2019
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

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Interesting thought about larger vessels. I suppose, if your topsides are close to the water, a rolley anchorage could knock the dink around. I've not measured, but will guesstimate that our topsides are 4-5 ft a mid-ship. Not sure if high enough. Generally would be.

I'm thinking of the practice as to whether it's easier than the davits to haul up overnight and launch in the morning. When I haul on the davits, it's a bit of a pain to clear our sugar scoop transom. Then, you can't just haul it clear of the water, I need to haul it to the top and attach the securing straps or it will swing back and forth mercilessly.

However, ever since I ditched the center console dinghy, in favor of an aluminum hull and tiller (much lighter and more interior room) I can easily do it myself. It's just time consuming. The mast halyard and bridle method would require two people, plus some method to keep from marring the topsides. One person on the winch and one on the side deck. I do pull it up this way, when storing the dink on the foredeck. However, it has no motor in those cases and I just pull it up by the bow.
For typical sized cruising yachts hoisting the RIB... it has to have attachment points for the hoisting bridle is not all that difficult. The halyward can be stored low enough to reach from the dink... the bridle stowed in the dink. You bring the dink to the stern where the halyard is waiting...shackle it to the bridle and climb our of the dink taking the dink pennant with you to the deck. The pull the dink to the beam... and use a mast winch hopefully with a Milwaukee and winch bit and up it goes to however high you want it. Tie off the pennant. You should have a stainless steel chain also shacked to the dink's transom.... Lock the chain to the tow rail or stanchion base. Chain and pennant secure the dink fore and aft and your done.

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post #23 of 141 Old 03-04-2019
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

Obviously if you want a comfortable reach you may have to change your plans. If the trades are blowing too far north of east and you are down in Trinidad and want to go iup island... maybe you sail to St Martin. If the wind is south of east then sailing down Island is going to be wet. Sail to Venezula.. and the work your way up Island. When you to go a specific place... you truly are at the mercy of the wind gods.

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post #24 of 141 Old 03-04-2019
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

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The mast halyard and bridle method would require two people, plus some method to keep from marring the topsides. One person on the winch and one on the side deck. I do pull it up this way, when storing the dink on the foredeck. However, it has no motor in those cases and I just pull it up by the bow.
Ever try using the windlass instead of a winch. It still requires two people, but it's a lot faster and safer.
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post #25 of 141 Old 03-04-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

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We do not have a gen set nor see the need for one. We run 550w of solar and it meets all our needs with the 6 house batteries we have. There may be an occasion that we need to run the engine but with a 150amp alternator we do not have to run it long.

We did look at wind but the cost of the wind gen is so high and a cost benefit analysis of wind vs diesel is way in favor of diesel and running the engine.

so far it has worked well for us but then we are not someone else -
Shalom Chuck and Patti -(my hero and mentor). Love the dribble, keep them coming. Love you all.
I agree on the 550 w of solar. I only have 350. If I had another 220w it would be a game changer here on Moondance. We also have a 150 amp alternator.. ( I told you , you are my mentor). Chris Parker we also agree on. Thanks for your input.
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

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Melissa
Currently in Bequia , Grenadines St Vincent.
Hi, there I was a CC captain in Bequia just a few months ago.

A picture of your toolbox and parts bin would be cool to see.

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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

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Ever try using the windlass instead of a winch. It still requires two people, but it's a lot faster and safer.
All of our halyards (main, jib, spin and staysail) all route behind the dodger to the cockpit cabin top, where there is an electric winch. I just need someone there to push the button, while another guides her up the side. The davits are a one person operation. A buddy just bought a boat with electric davit winches. Iíll have to see how cool that is this season. However, the manual effort is not an issue at all, for our light rib. Itís just a clunky time consuming process.
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post #28 of 141 Old 03-04-2019
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

Put in the 8kw Northern Lights as got an exceptionally good deal for it. 9k including installation. Ran the boat back and forth without a genset for a couple of years. Not an issue in Carib as solar and wind sufficed but not adequate wind in NE USA.
Wind generates 24/7. Solar only during the day. Actually get more watts out of solar when up north given the longer summer days.
A C isnít necessary in the tropics due to the wind but itís sure nice to escape the humidity and dry out the boat on occasion.
Genset goes on with ac, Watermaker, vacuum cleaner and water heater. It goes on when we want one of those and in order to get a load on it so does the other stuff.
Iím a big fan of the two D400s I have. No maintenance. Charge during the night. Finishes the last few % to get the lifelines to 100% and keep sulfanation away.
Inspite of having Ssb,gribs, chris and passage weather still a big fan of my Meteoman. Recording barometers tells you wants going on where you are immediately. Gribs can be quite misleading. Even the 500mb can be more accurate.
People forget they are the product of a computer program. When looking good to get two ways the numbers are crunched. Nam/gfs/wrk whatever. All too often have been in 30s when thereís one vane on the arrow.
For folks doing their first major excursion also remember compression zones and itís the waves that kill you not the wind. So 20-30 for a day is less troublesome than high teens for a week.
Going to Rodney bay on Wednesday to buddy boat with a friend has heís having boat troubles.
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post #29 of 141 Old 03-04-2019
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

Should mention like the low band width gribs on passage weather. Can get weather downloaded in a tenth of the time then with all the pretty colors and other unnecessary junk on the other sites. Helpful when WiFi is limited or youíre stuck using sat phone or SSB.
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

Stainless steel chain, separate lock on engine (thatís what they want) and raise it. Keep the dinghy. No T/T on dinghy decreases risk of break in to main vessel. We even removed our ols state numbers as well.
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