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post #71 of 141 Old 03-09-2019
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

Can get hot water from:
Engine or generator waste heat
Webasto furnace (used up north)
Heating element using AC electricity
Down here people also use those black solar heated bags to avoid the need to turn on a generator.
Our tanks are integral to the hull and at water inside eventually reaches ocean temp so is luke warm out of the cold faucet.
It’s surprising how long hot water lasts if you’re only using it to shower. Usually get 6 showers out of it. As it starts out so hot as mentioned above.
Often take cool showers to beat the heat for awhile.

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post #72 of 141 Old 03-09-2019
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

It terms of what works itís the spectra z ion system watermaker. No chemicals, no genset most times, cheap filters readily available in most places.
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post #73 of 141 Old 03-09-2019
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

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Originally Posted by Melrna View Post
Update: Single handed the boat overnight from Bequia to St Lucia (80nm). It was the full Monty of weather phenomenon, calm winds to roaring winds 25 kts between St Vincent and St Lucia, rain showers, calm seas to large seas. Wind on the bow to beam reach. Water over the bow and got hit with some beam seas. Boat is cover in salt water. My dink that was strapped down on the foredeck got moved by the green water coming over. Got sandwiched between cruise ships and freighters. Actually made the cruise ship turn course so as not to hit me because I had no place to go. He was nice about it. Overall an interesting experience. Main was reefed all night and jib was out, in, out, reefed, in, out ,in.. I was busy. Current was 1.5 kts starting behind me but as night progress moved to abeam. I ended up tacking back into Rodney Bay 10 NM out. What I planned was 5.5 kts and what I got was average 7.7 kts. So I ended up laying up for a few hours outside of Rodney Bay until sunrise ( I don't go into any anchorage at night). Heave too works, calmed the boat down, made coffee and had a nice breakfast. Of course all the cruise ships (4) and freighters started to show up all at the same time. So lots of radio chatter. They obviously had a pecking order to enter the main port here. They too waited until sunrise to enter. I have a lot of pictures of this to show but I still cannot figure out how to post here. Maybe Donna will bail me out again.
On the subject of dink outboard motors. 2 strokes rule out here. Not to say there isn't any 4 strokes but from my observation only Americans and Canadians carry those. Europeans like the smaller engines under 4 and our side of the world are either 9.9 or 18-20 hp. 2 strokes weigh less which can be a factor for a lot of people, myself included. My brand new Nissan is in the shop,, won't start. But I think it is a case of bad gas. I saw a rash of motors that wouldn't start in Bequia beside mine. Mine is under warranty so that is one less boat project I have to worry about for now. FYI - I believe there is only 3 manufactures of outboards. Yamaha and Honda are solo and the rest are made by Tohatsu/Mercury . Someone correct me on this please. Also Honda motors are hard to get parts and fixed outside the USA from what I understand too. I walked over to Island World store (West Marine Caribbean)(here in Rodney Bay) where I bought it from (Grenada) and within 30 mins a guy came to take it to the shop to fix it. Pretty cool. I should have it back tomorrow. I agree with Mark about a water separator. I have one but haven't installed it yet. I need to get new fittings for the new motor.
Not to be dismissive, this is only my second season here, but that seems fairly normal conditions to me. We had a passage a few weeks ago where in a dry squall we had solid 35 knots indicated and I saw a bump to 39. We always tie our anchors down to prevent them slamming when we get a face full.

Surely not pleasant, but many of our inter-island runs are preeminently over 20 and some predominantly over 25, and I think we are kinda careful.

Also I don’t understand about getting squeezed between shipping.

While our boats are both 44’ and single masted, they are there after radically different. 20 tons vs 12, full keel vs fin with a bulb, cutter vs sloop. Perhaps therein lies our different experiences.

Also, are you single handing?

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post #74 of 141 Old 03-10-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

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Not to be dismissive, this is only my second season here, but that seems fairly normal conditions to me. We had a passage a few weeks ago where in a dry squall we had solid 35 knots indicated and I saw a bump to 39. We always tie our anchors down to prevent them slamming when we get a face full.

Surely not pleasant, but many of our inter-island runs are preeminently over 20 and some predominantly over 25, and I think we are kinda careful.

Also I donít understand about getting squeezed between shipping.

While our boats are both 44í and single masted, they are there after radically different. 20 tons vs 12, full keel vs fin with a bulb, cutter vs sloop. Perhaps therein lies our different experiences.

Also, are you single handing?
Yes you are correct in that these are normal conditions down here. That is what I trying to point out to those that don't sail down here.
The cruise ship and freighter squeeze is hard to explain without a photo. ( I have it but can never figure out how to post photos here). Basically the cruise ship was on my forward port beam heading on an intercept course, the freighter was just behind me 1/2 mile away on my starboard side. I had already turned 60 degrees to port to avoid him when the cruise ship 20 mins later became a problem. Wind was 50 degrees off my starboard. It was either lay-up or have the cruise ship turn 10 degrees to pass off my stern, which he did. That cruise ship was also a problem for the said freighter because I heard them chat also. When the other 3 cruise ship came over the horizon and 2 more freighters also showed up it became quite the show. They were mostly talking on channel 9 and 14.

Heavy displacement vs modern construction boats ride and sail differently. No question about it. Pick you poison. Having said that , you did say not pleasant either. So maybe not so different.

On this leg of the journey , yes I sailed alone. Spouse is in the US dealing with a family emergency. But than, I am the captain and owner of this ship.

Melissa Renee
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post #75 of 141 Old 03-10-2019
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

Mel, the ColRegs don't do a good job of resolving multiple conflicts, that's for sure. What relative direction was the boat to your starboard heading? You were stand on with respect to the cruise ship off your port, I assume. If this turn would not conflict with the starboard traffic, I probably would have made a very large (90 deg) turn to port to take the cruise ships stern, but the other traffic may be prevented and I can't picture it.

The other undefined issue in the ColRegs is when risk of collision actually exists. Prior to that point, there are no stand on and give way vessels, and any ship can make any turn it chooses. Although, they should be made in a very obvious manner.


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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

Does anyone here use pilot charts? Are they periodically updated? Have the trade winds changed in magnitude and direction over time? After reading posts which report about winds in the Caribbean on this site over the past few years my impression having been down there for 4 years back in the early 90s is that winds are not stronger and with more gusts. I write this because I used to sail full hoist virtually all the time yet some write they are usually setting one reef down there lately .

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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

I was just down there for two weeks. Full hoist every day. Most we saw was 16kts. It was much less than I'm accustom to over the winter, but not unheard of. Virtually no one sails every day, so all of our experiences are in fairly limited windows. Overall change like this needs a much bigger statistical look.

I just went to weather underground to see if I could get historical data at STT. They have it, but I haven't figured out how to get multiple years of it at once.

March has seen daily max wind range from 16 to 22 kts at the STT airport. Min daily from 0 to 8 kts.

I looked at January too. Max daily was between 14 and 24 kts. Min daily ranged from 0-7.
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post #78 of 141 Old 03-10-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

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Does anyone here use pilot charts? Are they periodically updated? Have the trade winds changed in magnitude and direction over time? After reading posts which report about winds in the Caribbean on this site over the past few years my impression having been down there for 4 years back in the early 90s is that winds are not stronger and with more gusts. I write this because I used to sail full hoist virtually all the time yet some write they are usually setting one reef down there lately .
I have been told by old salts that the winds in the Windward Islands have been stronger over the last several years. The cold fronts coming off the USA don't get down here to much to lesson the trade winds. If they do only about 5 knots from what we have seen. The cold fronts do penetrate in the Leeward Islands like the BVI area. They get more relaxing wind relief than the Windward Islands.
Now for a broader discussion, I would think heavy full displacement keel boat say 40-55,000 lbs or more of the 70,80,90's vintage take a lot more wind to move than the modern production boats like mine that weigh 25,000 lbs fully loaded. Furthermore, since we are sailing the "HOUSE" vs a charter boat , we sail to keep the boat upright hence conservatively (reef sails). It is just our style, might not be yours.

The Colregs did work in my instance because I was the stand on vessel and the cruise ship did turn. Not only did he turned for me but also for the freighter. However, other parts of the regs worked against me like mass tonnage and ability to turn. But again the cruise ship did have the sea room to maneuver out of the way. Still, I am not a fan of looking at the bow wave of a BAB (Big Ass Boat) heading my way. I could turn 90 to port and lay up. That was plan B. He would have missed me by 1000 feet according to AIS. I was only 5 miles off the coast of St Lucia when all this happen near the port of Castries. Since Moondance is a magnet for cruise ships I have more encounters than I care for. I am getting actually good at talking them. In all cases they have turned to pass off my stern. They have been most kind. The two things I don't like is I/we the cruising community are fair game to entertain their passengers with. They seem to like to get real close than turn to avoid. Not for the faint heart. The second thing I hate is they get so close, I always ask for a meal to to be dropped over the side. This time I asked for a hot fudge sundae. They have never replied with any of my request.
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

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I have been told by old salts that the winds in the Windward Islands have been stronger over the last several years. The cold fronts coming off the USA don't get down here to much to lesson the trade winds. If they do only about 5 knots from what we have seen. The cold fronts do penetrate in the Leeward Islands like the BVI area. They get more relaxing wind relief than the Windward Islands.
Now for a broader discussion, I would think heavy full displacement keel boat say 40-55,000 lbs or more of the 70,80,90's vintage take a lot more wind to move than the modern production boats like mine that weigh 25,000 lbs fully loaded. Furthermore, since we are sailing the "HOUSE" vs a charter boat , we sail to keep the boat upright hence conservatively (reef sails). It is just our style, might not be yours.

The Colregs did work in my instance because I was the stand on vessel and the cruise ship did turn. Not only did he turned for me but also for the freighter. However, other parts of the regs worked against me like mass tonnage and ability to turn. But again the cruise ship did have the sea room to maneuver out of the way. Still, I am not a fan of looking at the bow wave of a BAB (Big Ass Boat) heading my way. I could turn 90 to port and lay up. That was plan B. He would have missed me by 1000 feet according to AIS. I was only 5 miles off the coast of St Lucia when all this happen near the port of Castries. Since Moondance is a magnet for cruise ships I have more encounters than I care for. I am getting actually good at talking them. In all cases they have turned to pass off my stern. They have been most kind. The two things I don't like is I/we the cruising community are fair game to entertain their passengers with. They seem to like to get real close than turn to avoid. Not for the faint heart. The second thing I hate is they get so close, I always ask for a meal to to be dropped over the side. This time I asked for a hot fudge sundae. They have never replied with any of my request.
Thanks for this post. As I haven't sailed down there for several decades it sounds as if there has been a lot of changes. I don't even recall cruise ships in the Windwards except in Philipsberg, St Maarten, but I am sure there had to be more than what I saw. The french has sailing cruise ships.

I keep the boat heeled no more than 15į.. 20į I am making too much leeway. Lots of heeling get uncomfortable if truth be told. Definitely sounds windier!

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post #80 of 141 Old 03-11-2019
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Re: Caribbean, What works and doesn't

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The cruise ship and freighter squeeze is hard to explain without a photo. ( I have it but can never figure out how to post photos here). Basically the cruise ship was on my forward port beam heading on an intercept course, the freighter was just behind me 1/2 mile away on my starboard side. I had already turned 60 degrees to port to avoid him when the cruise ship 20 mins later became a problem. Wind was 50 degrees off my starboard. It was either lay-up or have the cruise ship turn 10 degrees to pass off my stern, which he did. That cruise ship was also a problem for the said freighter because I heard them chat also. When the other 3 cruise ship came over the horizon and 2 more freighters also showed up it became quite the show. They were mostly talking on channel 9 and 14.

.
We have run across this multiple times crossing or in TSS in the Carib and Med and Black Sea. We always pick up the radio and call and we work it out. We all want to be safe and I could care less what ColReg says that I am the stand on vessel he is bigger and I am vulnerable - therefore we call - Only one time did the bid guy say sorry I can't move because he had issues too. At times have had worked our way though 3-4 vessels coming at us from various direction and we talk with all and everyone works it out. And when we are close to the wind we tell them we can move X deg but then will have to start our engine and they understand and worked with us.
Communications is the key - In fact funny story we were crossing the end of the Mona and had just come out of a rain storm and another on the horizon and cruise ship was coming at us and we were reefed down and I called the ship and said we are undersail at 50deg on the wind but could move if he wanted us to. He said yes I see you and said maintain course and position and he turned and we passed starboard to starboard and just before the pass he asked us a lot of info like where we came from - going to - we guessed he was giving his passengers a briefing so we gave him a complete run down - SoulMates got a lot of pics of her taken that day - OH and we apologized for not having full sails up as we were headed to the next rain storm - he laughed and said he understood --
All the big guys we deal with have been great an understand and work with us. COMMUNICATIONS is the key
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