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post #1 of 15 Old 03-24-2019 Thread Starter
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Entering a Foreign Port

I've never cruised before. What happens when I enter a foreign port? I get that I have to report to customs and immigration, or moore, raise the Q flag and wait for them to board. But what happens next? Do I get directed to a slip. Do I moore or anchor somewhere else? If I get directed to a slip, what's this going to cost? If I want to save money, can I moore someplace free or anchor? If I moore or anchor, how do I get to shore? Are there water taxis? Do I use the Dingy? If there are water taxis, how do I signal them? Do I use the marine radio, raise a flag, use a cell phone? Is it ok to leave my boat unmanned at a mooring or anchorage?

I will be sailing single handed.

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post #2 of 15 Old 03-24-2019
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Re: Entering a Foreign Port

It depends ........
You'll get better answers if you name your proposed cruising area

The hysterical laughter you hear as you drive a way in your"new" boat ..... is the seller.
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Re: Entering a Foreign Port

If you wait for them to board you will have a very long wait. Before you leave your last port you look at a cruising guide or search on the internet if available. You identify the ports of entry. Then you sail to the port of entry of your choosing. You go to customs and immigration. There’s slight variations in whether only the captain goes alone or other crew can come along and whether you go to a computer screen or live people. You bring everyone’s passports and your documentation papers and sometimes you need to bring your outbound clearance from the last country you were in. Noonsite, cruising guides or a internet search will tell you what’s needed.
Would suggest if live people are involved: take off sunglasses and hat apron entry, wear a collared shirt, have needed papers in hand, and most importantly be very polite. Have yet to have an issue. It’s not a big deal.
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post #4 of 15 Old 03-25-2019
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Re: Entering a Foreign Port

Every country is different.
Check Noonsight https://www.noonsite.com/ for the information on each port.

But as good as that is you can still make mistakes.

In *Most* Ports of Entry:

Anchor with your Yellow Flag up
Jump in your dinghy and head to shore (see Google Earth to see where all the dinghies are.)
Find and clear in at:
Immigration
Customs
Harbour Master
But not necessarily in that order. They may be a bus ride away and a bus ride away from each other!
Take ALL your paperwork
Take NONE of your crew (But some places want all your crew)

At a port where theres a marina (not so often!) the marina will know where all the offices are to clear in or may arrange it themselves (be careful they can charge you hundreds of dollars for something you can do for free - Turkey)

In some places they will want you to stay on your boat and they will come and find you, This can take hours (or maybe even days, Ive heard)
In Galapagos I went to shore and was yelled at "Get back on your boat, we come to you!"

Indonesia took 4 DAYS to clear In and 2 DAYS to clear out and a hefty bribe.

Some countries you just ring them (UK)
Some countries its almost impossible to find the offices (USA New York they used to come visit now you need to go to 2 offices in New Jersey neither accessible by public transport, neither building marked etc etc etc just a frickin pain)

But you get used to ti and after a while it becomes one of the joys of cruising.

Always wear neat clean clothes and footwear LONG trousers and LONG sleeved shirts unless you know the place. Yes, even in the tropics, or more likeley, often in the tropics.
Always be ultra polite as theres some well known jerks - The BVIs are a classic for rudeness (in fake US accents - go figure)... and Jolly Harbour, Antigua has the "Three Doors of Hell"... you have to visit them all and behind one door, it changes each time you visit, is the utter jerk.

Finally, as for guns.. I really dont know but you MUST research it before if you are carrying weapons... some countries you must go ashore with them to the police... but other countries you leave them on the boat - one friend thinking he was doing the right thing jumped on a bus with a war full of guns and was arrested. Mexico hates shotguns and that gets you arrested... yada, yada.

Finally (maybe this should be up the top) Visas! Some countries you can not just swan into but you need a proper visa BEFORE you arrive (USA, Brazil, many asian countries) depending on your nationality.

Finally, some countries charge you extra to clear in on weekends - And weekends are Friday, Saturday and Sunday, and this can be very expensive (Thailand and Malaysia)

So theres lots of stuff you need to know



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Re: Entering a Foreign Port

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkofSeaLife View Post
Every country is different.
Check Noonsight https://www.noonsite.com/ for the information on each port.

B

Mark
See post #2
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The hysterical laughter you hear as you drive a way in your"new" boat ..... is the seller.

Last edited by MarkofSeaLife; 03-25-2019 at 07:54 AM.
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post #6 of 15 Old 03-25-2019
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Re: Entering a Foreign Port

Please fill in your empty BIO here. This will help others help you.
And put in your boat and home port in your sig line.

As pointed out, entry into foreign ports varies a lot.
For instance, when we enter Canada, we just phone in our passport and boat info at a kiosk on a marked customs dock. After a few questions, the friendly voice on the other end welcomes us to Canada.... !
Reentering the US is not... quite... as... "friendly"....
(in comparison)

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Re: Entering a Foreign Port

Also note that all of officialdom may work banker's hours. From vaguely 7-10AM until 4-5PM, and that if you require service outside of those hours, or on holidays or weekends, you may be given a hefty bill for overtime.

In some ports the 2-3 offices will be under one roof. In others, they'll require a serious hike or a taxi ride back and forth. Some will send you back to your boat if you are not dressed "appropriately", which can mean long pants and shoes and other things.

Your best bet on this could be noonsite.com, Jimmy Cornell's excellent site that tries to keep track of what you can expect in ports all over the world.

And then there's the one...Barbados, where simply wearing "camo" clothing of any kind will get you arrested on the spot. I suppose you could argue that if they could SEE you, it wasn't really camo, was it?
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Re: Entering a Foreign Port

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Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
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And then there's the one...Barbados, where simply wearing "camo" clothing of any kind will get you arrested on the spot. I suppose you could argue that if they could SEE you, it wasn't really camo, was it?
Cameron Diaz was thrown out of some country (Bolivia?) for wearing a Che Guevara t-shirt.

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Re: Entering a Foreign Port

Yeah, supporting or endorsing an enemy of the state can get that kind of warm response. South American politics, history, revolutions...

"The Death of Che Guevara: Declassified
By Peter Kornbluh
National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 5
For more information contact:
Peter Kornbluh 202/994-7000 or [email protected]


Washington, D.C. – On October 9th, 1967, Ernesto "Che" Guevara was put to death by Bolivian soldiers, trained, equipped and guided by U.S. Green Beret and CIA operatives. His execution remains a historic and controversial event; and thirty years later, the circumstances of his guerrilla foray into Bolivia, his capture, killing, and burial are still the subject of intense public interest and discussion around the world.

As part of the thirtieth anniversary of the death of Che Guevara, the National Security Archive's Cuba Documentation Project is posting a selection of key CIA, State Department, and Pentagon documentation relating to Guevara and his death. This electronic documents book is compiled from declassified records obtained by the National Security Archive, and by authors of two new books on Guevara: Jorge Castañeda's Compañero: The Life and Death of Che Guevara (Knopf), and Henry Butterfield Ryan's The Fall of Che Guevara (Oxford University Press). The selected documents, presented in order of the events they depict, provide only a partial picture of U.S. intelligence and military assessments, reports and extensive operations to track and "destroy" Che Guevara's guerrillas in Bolivia; thousands of CIA and military records on Guevara remain classified. But they do offer significant and valuable information on the high-level U.S. interest in tracking his revolutionary activities, and U.S. and Bolivian actions leading up to his death."

Talk about bearding the tiger. No doubt, like Rick in Casablanca, she "was misinformed".
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post #10 of 15 Old 03-25-2019
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Re: Entering a Foreign Port

In the Eastern Caribbean, almost all customs/immigration offices are open 9 AM to 1200 noon and 13:00 to at least 14:00 but normally 15:00, excepting holidays and weekends.
Your best shot at accurate info for the area you are sailing are cruising guides. They are by far a better source of all the information you might need, so spend most of your money on them and just buy a few overall charts of the areas you will be sailing.
Beware of dress codes and don't antagonize the officials, and everything should go easily.
I always wear a button down collar shirt, clean shorts where permitted (not in Trinidad) and shoes, not flip flops, rather than an old T-shirt and grubby shorts. I believe this shows some respect for the officers and several times when I've misplaced a clearance form or whatever, I've been treated well and helped, not berated.

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Last edited by MarkofSeaLife; 03-27-2019 at 02:36 AM. Reason: fixed bolding
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