Safety and security in the Caribbean. - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 35 Old 10-03-2019 Thread Starter
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Safety and security in the Caribbean.

Every now and the someone posts a question about how safe it may be to sail the Caribbean.
A few months back I posted "de shotupboatmon" about the veracity of the reports on the CSSN and after some research I found that of 5 reports in 3 or 4 years of pirate attacks between Grenada and Trinidad, only one had any veracity at all! Now it appears that the Caribbean Safety and Security Net has a lot more folks questioning the validity of their reporting system.
So, for those worried about the safety of sailing the Caribbean Islands, I suggest you are probably a lot safer on your boat sailing down here than you would be on the waterfront of most American cities.

"Any idiot can make a boat go; it takes a sailor to stop one." Spike Africa aboard the schooner Wanderer in Sausalito, Ca. 1964.
“Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.” ― Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows

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post #2 of 35 Old 10-03-2019
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Re: Safety and security in the Caribbean.

Gulf of paria on your end.
Honduras and nic in the west
Then some places in haiti that you should not go
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post #3 of 35 Old 10-03-2019
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Re: Safety and security in the Caribbean.

This is on my mind as we intend to do the Western Carib next winter (20/21). Recent reports have been concerning.

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post #4 of 35 Old 10-03-2019
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Re: Safety and security in the Caribbean.

Still read noonsite. However this pass fall there was a rash of theft in the southern bays of Grenada. The victims directly reported the events of the local morning net. The local cruisers figured out perps were swimming out to unattended boats. Then either swimming back or stealing a tender from the boat then abandoning it once they got back to land. No mention of these events on noonsite.
While we were in St. Lucia several couples were mugged just outside the large shopping area abutting the bay. Again no mention.
While in the BVIs a cruiser was shot at. He was moored in the east end. That did appear in the local news but not on the sailor websites.
So think it goes both ways. Throughout the Caribbean dinghies are stolen. Seems mostly for the engines. But agree violence against cruisers is rare. Feel safer in the Islands then in Baltimore,Washington, Detroit, Chicago or LA. So your point is well taken. However, just like any major city anywhere in the world there’s hot spots to avoid. It’s on you to figure out where not to go and when not to go.

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post #5 of 35 Old 10-03-2019
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Re: Safety and security in the Caribbean.

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
......I suggest you are probably a lot safer on your boat sailing down here than you would be on the waterfront of most American cities.
I find cruising the Caribbean to be quite manageable. However, this is an over exaggeration. Most cities? No way. In most US cities I’ve been to, I don’t even lock my companionway. I’ve chained my dinghy to the docks exactly twice.

While I agree that the world is a safer place than some make it sound, I don’t think the antidote is to overstate the case.


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post #6 of 35 Old 10-03-2019
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Re: Safety and security in the Caribbean.

Ok.... Well... And definitely without my moderators hat on...


In 2010 I went up the gulf of Aden and the Red Sea and we had pirates. Real ones.

When I got to the Caribbean I felt safe as houses. Safe. Very safe.

The difference you feel when 50 miles off Somalia and in the Caribbean islands is so different it's utterly laughable.

When I started reading the Caribbean Safety Networks stuff about stolen unlocked dinghies I realised what BS they were . I had just defied murdering extremists to be plunged into a tepid bay of dinghy theft fear.

The Caribbean is as safe as it gets. Please do not read the exacerbating BS. Listen to the local info... If you need to drive overnight from Trinidad to Grenada with no light then DO It. It's only 70 miles. It's not the 1,600 nms I had to go.
If you have to lock your dinghy up what's the price of a padlock? $10?

Please don't listen to "security networks".
Use your own brain.

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post #7 of 35 Old 10-03-2019
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Re: Safety and security in the Caribbean.

My view is...
1..at distance
2..close in
3..at anchor

On land is everywhere most people deal with daily..nothing unique

Awareness and plans
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post #8 of 35 Old 10-04-2019
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Re: Safety and security in the Caribbean.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkofSeaLife View Post
Ok.... Well... And definitely without my moderators hat on...


In 2010 I went up the gulf of Aden and the Red Sea and we had pirates. Real ones.

When I got to the Caribbean I felt safe as houses. Safe. Very safe.

The difference you feel when 50 miles off Somalia and in the Caribbean islands is so different it's utterly laughable.

When I started reading the Caribbean Safety Networks stuff about stolen unlocked dinghies I realised what BS they were . I had just defied murdering extremists to be plunged into a tepid bay of dinghy theft fear.

The Caribbean is as safe as it gets. Please do not read the exacerbating BS. Listen to the local info... If you need to drive overnight from Trinidad to Grenada with no light then DO It. It's only 70 miles. It's not the 1,600 nms I had to go.
If you have to lock your dinghy up what's the price of a padlock? $10?

Please don't listen to "security networks".
Use your own brain.
Mark,
It's all about life experience. I've found that fear is the inverse of risk experienced.

In my opinion Americans have an overactive sense of fear due to the media.

Visit some of the less attractive parts of the world where the real shooting is happening and you'll come away with your sense of "danger" re-calibrated and an enhanced ability to sense when something's not right.

Jim

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post #9 of 35 Old 10-04-2019
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Re: Safety and security in the Caribbean.

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
...I found that of 5 reports in 3 or 4 years of pirate attacks between Grenada and Trinidad, only one had any veracity at all!
I'd be curious to know exactly how you were able to determine the veracity of reports 3-4 years old. And exactly what you mean by saying 4 of the 5 had no veracity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimMcGee View Post
Visit some of the less attractive parts of the world where the real shooting is happening and you'll come away with your sense of "danger" re-calibrated and an enhanced ability to sense when something's not right.
This I agree with completely. In the end, it is your own sense of "when something's not right" that you should be listening to.

I understand that there is a huge difference between a risk of being killed and a risk of having your dinghy stolen. You need to balance your worries with the real level of risk that you are talking about. Nonetheless, I'd still prefer NOT to have my dinghy stolen!
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post #10 of 35 Old 10-05-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Safety and security in the Caribbean.

[QUOTE=denverd0n;2051629534]I'd be curious to know exactly how you were able to determine the veracity of reports 3-4 years old. And exactly what you mean by saying 4 of the 5 had no veracity.QUOTE]
Well, we've been here for around 8, and travel to Trinidad quite a bit, so we hear the real stories from more reliable sources on both ends. Like the marina personnel where a boatr first docks or a yard that supposedly "fixed" damage. If you go on Grenada cruisers facebook page right now and read Darren's response to on claim; a good example of the wrongful claims I think are way too common on CSSN.

"Any idiot can make a boat go; it takes a sailor to stop one." Spike Africa aboard the schooner Wanderer in Sausalito, Ca. 1964.
“Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.” ― Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows

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