Doing my first oil change/fuel filter change on Yanmar (YSB8) - SailNet Community
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Doing my first oil change/fuel filter change on Yanmar (YSB8)

I'm going to give this a try shortly. Should I change the filter after I change the oil, or before?

Can someone give me some pointers on bleeding the lines afterwards?


Lastly...could the need for an oil change/fuel filter change be causing the boat to not throttle up very well...like the engine isn't getting enough fuel perhaps? It was putt-putting about last week when I took her out, had a hard time achieving any speed. I was hoping doing this oil and filter change, and doing the little twisty-scraper thing might help fix this, but I'm new all this engine maintenance stuff. I hope you know what I mean by the twisty scraper...I believe I can take part of that out too and spray it with brake cleaner if need be.
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Re: Doing my first oil change/fuel filter change on Yanmar (YSB8)

Better people on the forum than me but this is what I do.

Warm engine for 20 minutes. Thus warms the oil.
Suck oil out dip stick hole.
Then replace filter.
Fill with oil.
Then change both fuel filters filling them.

Then turn on engine. Yanmar will suck up the fuel without you bleadibg it.
Run for 30 minutes because at 20 minutes it might chug a few bubbles out.

Then rev to MAX revs for 2 to 3 seconds three times. Don't worry, the engine is made for it.

A good fast engine run for 5 or 10 minutes is good too.


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Re: Doing my first oil change/fuel filter change on Yanmar (YSB8)

I would probably replace the fuel filter first and do that while the engine is cool just because it is much nicer to work on a cool engine. My procedure is to shut off the fuel line at the tank. I typically do the Racor filter first simply because its less messy that way on my particular boat. Then I pull the engine mounted filter. I have an ancient little basting bulb syringe that I use to fill the cartridge compartments through the bleed screw holes. Then I open the fuel line, close the water intake, and bleed the engine. Once that is done I start the engine and kill it as soon as it starts, open the water intake, restart the engine to look for fuel leaks, and then move onto the lube oil system.

Before changing the lube oil, I typically run the engine for somewhere between a quarter to a half hour to make sure that the oil is warm and that any fine material or moisture is in suspension. I then pump out all of the old oil that I can as quickly as I can. I then remove the old lube oil filter. (My favorite trick is to make a catch basin out of an old gallon milk jug bottom and place that under the fuel filter before and during the time that I am removing it, and dump the filter into the catch basin while I am working simply as a way of containing the mess.) I then install the new oil filter. I like to let the engine sit maybe 20 minutes (including the time to remove and reinstall the filter) then do a final pump out of whatever lube oil has seeped down from the upper engine in the meantime. The last steps are to refill the oil, run the engine for a few minutes looking for leaks and circulating the oil through the filter, and then shut the engine down and check the dipstick again. The oil filter uses maybe half a cup of oil so I typically need to add a little more oil after that.

Lastly, I check the belts and hoses, and the shift linkage and fuel cut off cable adjustments while I am there, and I put a description of what was done, date, and engine hours in my logbook. By that time it is usually time for lunch.

That's about it,
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Last edited by Jeff_H; 4 Weeks Ago at 01:28 PM.
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Re: Doing my first oil change/fuel filter change on Yanmar (YSB8)

The YSB will not bleed itself but it's easy enough to bleed.

If you have an electric fuel lift pump, hit the key switch so the pump is running then start at the primary filter opening the bleed port till fuel runs out then move to the secondary filter and repeat. From there, mine will usually go just fine but if it give you trouble just bleed again at the injector.

If you have a mechanical pump (mostly a YSM thing) crank it with the compression release engaged instead of using the electric pump.

The throttle issue may be related to a clogged fuel filter but it's mostly been related to the regulator setting in my experience.

This here:



MARK IT first. then loosen the clamp and move it a tiny bit one way or the other (I never can remember and always have to just try and see) if it gets better then you went the right way, if it gets worse, go the other way! Your ideal state will be the engine idling along just dandy and only stopping when you pull the throttle back or hit the separate kill lever if you have one. If you move it too far, it won't stop. In that case, you can stop it with the compression release.
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Re: Doing my first oil change/fuel filter change on Yanmar (YSB8)

Forgot to mention.

Yes, you can pull the filter assembly out and clean it with brake cleaner if you want. Just make sure you have a replacement gasket for it. I have not typically found much in there but it never hurts.
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Re: Doing my first oil change/fuel filter change on Yanmar (YSB8)

All great advice here. In regards to your comment:

> causing the boat to not throttle up very well...like the engine isn't getting enough fuel perhaps

That symptom could very well be due to not enough fuel, often caused by blocked fuel filter, which might be addressed by new filters.

but could also be due to
- intake air restriction, check for blockages in the air intake
- exhaust restriction, check the exhaust path, in particular the mixing elbow
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Re: Doing my first oil change/fuel filter change on Yanmar (YSB8)

Good advice above. Just a couple of comments. Oil change not likely to affect throttle issue. Avoiding a mess when changing the oil filter is worth thinking carefully about. I also change the fuel filter first. By the time you run the engine to warm the oil, you should know if you have gotten all the air out of the fuel system.
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