Removing trans from engine - Page 2 - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 17 Old 11-10-2009
Super Moderator
 
Maine Sail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Maine Coast
Posts: 6,740
Thanks: 33
Thanked 365 Times in 285 Posts
Rep Power: 10
       
This is a 44B Four

This is a 44B Four but should be similar except for the gear box. Not a difficult job but time consuming none the less.

A word of caution about PB Blaster is DO NOT get it on or near any engine seals such as the rear main or the tranny input or output seals. PB Blaster can soften seals and ruin them. Ask me how I found out..

You will likely not have enough room between the bell housing and the engine for wood shims. These Mitsubishi blocks are compact. If you are not removing the bell housing then block under it. A good size piece of plywood to distribute the load under the oil pan works well and the pan is plenty strong for this load provided you don't go dropping the engine on the pan from one + foot.


The allen head machine screws that hold the damper plate on are coated with Red Loc-Tite from the factory. Trying to get them out without an impact driver may cause you to snap them. I used heat from a mini butane torch after a liberal soak with PB Blaster. I simply blasted the head of the allen screw for about 60 seconds with the mini torch, which softened the Red Loc-Tite, then quickly used the impact driver while they were still hot. Use a small battery powered impact driver and you'll have no problems.

Unlike Osirisail I find I break bolts much less often with impact drivers as the 1200+ beats per minute really do a nice job of "impacting" or breaking the bolt free, in conjunction with PB Blaster, especially when working on spars with aluminum/stainless corrosion. Having grown up restoring antique cars, and removing thousands of rusted bolts, my odds & success rates with impact drivers are far better than by hand..



While you're in there you might want to pull the flywheel and replace the rear main seal, depending upon the engine hours.


Rear main goes here:


Might as well put a coat of fresh paint on stuff while you have it apart:



Oh and it's easier to change tranny fluid with the gear box off. I actually spun mine with a Hole Hawg drill and flushed about four quarts of clean new fluid through it giving it a full internal cleaning:


Don't forget proper torque specs which can be found in the manual:



Then put it all back together:

______
-Maine Sail / CS-36T


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




© Images In Posts Property of Compass Marine Inc.


Maine Sail is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 17 Old 11-11-2009
Member
 
osirissail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Caribbean
Posts: 76
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
 
- - Not doubt about it, a photo is worth a thousand words - - and with those most excellent photos you have a hundred thousand or so's worth of wonderful explanations of how to do the job.
- - The little hex socket machine screws have always been a problem is they are torqued and have lock-tite on them. The heat and rapid "hammer drill" are undoubtedly the "secret formula" for maximum success.
- - Maine Sail - that socket for the hex cap screws? Does it have the Allen wrench inside an outside collar that surrounds the head of the hex socket screw? (as opposed to just the allen wrench protruding )?
osirissail is offline  
post #13 of 17 Old 11-11-2009
Member
 
osirissail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Caribbean
Posts: 76
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
 
- - The cleaning and painting is also a most excellent idea as rust is a major problem in the salt water atmosphere we live in. And more than anything a clean painted engine/transmission will show any leaks or other problems much easier than an old rusty one.
- - I noticed the heat exchanger (freshly painted) has the flat "end caps". With the heater exchanger removed from the engine, this is a good time to take off those end cap(s) and carefully inspect the insides for any broken off impeller vanes and other debris. I carefully clean each of the small copper tubes using a very long shank drill bit sized to fit inside the tubes. This will help remove any stubborn sea life or other obstacles to the free flow of cooling water through the heat exchanger.
- - Heat exchangers can be "home tested" by making an outlet valve from small pieces of left over hose and a some hose clamps. Use your home garden hose with fittings to reduce the end down to fit over the inlet of the raw water inlet on the heat exchanger. Then attach the other little hose with a restrictor - valve or hose clamp to the raw water outlet from the heat exchanger. Then put water pressure from the house garden hose - normally in the 30 to 50 psi range into the heat exchanger and slowly close off the water exit. If any fresh water is escaping from core (engine coolant) side of the heat exchanger you need a new heat exchanger. A leaking heat exchanger can do major damage to your engine's coolant system. Also check visually and by using flexible probes all the hoses from the engine's raw water pump to the heat exchanger. Little pieces of a broken impeller vanes can lodge in bends and corners restricting raw water flow causing mild to severe overheating of the engine.

Last edited by osirissail; 11-11-2009 at 06:46 AM.
osirissail is offline  
 
post #14 of 17 Old 11-11-2009
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,289
Thanks: 0
Thanked 20 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 19
         
That isn't a hammer drill, it is an impact wrench. The two, while superficially similar—ARE NOT THE SAME THING.

Quote:
Originally Posted by osirissail View Post
- - Not doubt about it, a photo is worth a thousand words - - and with those most excellent photos you have a hundred thousand or so's worth of wonderful explanations of how to do the job.
- - The little hex socket machine screws have always been a problem is they are torqued and have lock-tite on them. The heat and rapid "hammer drill" are undoubtedly the "secret formula" for maximum success.
- - Maine Sail - that socket for the hex cap screws? Does it have the Allen wrench inside an outside collar that surrounds the head of the hex socket screw? (as opposed to just the allen wrench protruding )?



Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
post #15 of 17 Old 11-11-2009
Member
 
osirissail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Caribbean
Posts: 76
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
 
- - You need to just add the word "Electric" to the description -> electric impact socket "wrench" (there is a formal name for the tool, but I forgot what it is). Having the proper tools available makes all the difference in the world. I have seen those type tools in both electric and pneumatic - tyre (tire) stores use them to remove and install lug nuts on cars. They can be set for a specific "torque" value and then when that is exceeded they slip and output "shock/impact" loads to the reticent bolt/nut.
- - I love tools and would certainly like one of those, but they are rather job specific and not something you would normally see carried in a cruising sailor's toolbox. What you will see is the old fashion "impact" wrench which looks like a fat large centerpunch with a 1/4" socket on one end. The other end you smack with a sledge hammer with much gusto. As the body slides down the shaft a rotational force is applied to the bolt/nut. It is the heavy blows from the sledge hammer directed axially down the tool that causes havoc with bearings, seals and other parts. In the absence of the "proper tool" as show in the photo, you can make due with a socket set breaker bar and piece of pipe assisted with a sledge hammer delivering a rotational impact. The idea is to avoid the axial pounding that directs the most force into the engine and its bearings and seals. And - the heat applied to the bolt to melt the Locktite is probably the most important step to avoid having to use any form of "impact".

Last edited by osirissail; 11-11-2009 at 08:19 AM.
osirissail is offline  
post #16 of 17 Old 11-15-2009 Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: NY Metro
Posts: 52
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
 
I hadn't checked back in a few days and wow ! What an incredible effort on the part of all contributors. Thank you.

The photos are indeed terrific and helpful. I would eat off the glass under that enigine. Jimminy crickets thats clean. Well done.

It is in all these little tips - such as knowing there will be locktite in the retaining bolts for the plate - that will speed this repair along. You have terrific access that I do not have. This is an on the belly job.

I will begin shortly as now I am cleaning like a mental patient before the canvas cover goes on. I will report back in with progress.

Thanks again everyone. This is really quite a gift.

What do you folks use to clean the engine a) in the nice parts that have just accumulated dust from belts, etc. and b) for the naughty parts with rust ? What type of paint did you use?

I am very happy with the Westerbeke and it has only about 450 hours on it. I plan to keep it for many, many thousands.

Andrew
cutterorient is offline  
post #17 of 17 Old 11-16-2009
Member
 
osirissail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Caribbean
Posts: 76
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
 
- - For engine paint go to the local discount hardware store or automobile parts store and you will find "Engine" spray paint. It is high temperature resistant paint that will blister when the engine heats up.
- - For cleaning I use the "Purple" spray engine cleaner in a little spray bottle. It is also available in the auto parts and discount hardware stores. You need to arrange some method of removing the material that drains off the engine safely - especially if the boat is in the water. You spray on the engine "degreaser" and let it work for a few minutes, then flush with high pressure (garden hose and spray nozzle) water. Then pump out the water, degreaser, and dirt from the bilge. Be sure to turn off any bilge pumps or remove them so you do not put the residue water out into the bay. If you are on the hard, you can hook up a bucket/drum with a piece of hose stuffed into your bilge pump thru-hull and then use the bilge pump.
osirissail is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Removing Zinc Anode Plugs from Engine casey1999 Diesel 26 05-10-2015 07:21 PM
Removing cutless bearing without removing the shaft (Video) SSBN506 Gear & Maintenance 5 07-15-2014 04:37 PM
Removing engine controls from old Edson pedestal Flight Risk Gear & Maintenance 2 01-12-2013 12:54 AM
Removing Engine titan151 Diesel 7 05-04-2010 06:51 AM
Removing propshaft from engine coupler belanich Gear & Maintenance 27 01-16-2009 11:25 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome