trailer sailer electrical refit: safety first advice - SailNet Community
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By Classic30
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 8 Old 04-20-2015 Thread Starter
r20
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 7
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
trailer sailer electrical refit: safety first advice

I'm starting from nothing but some old 1975 house wire in my 20 Ranger sailboat. I may reuse the vhf antenna, and the running lights. Otherwise, nothing is salvageable. I lack vhf, lights, bilge pump, and all instruments.

I mostly do 2-3 day cruises around Puget Sound and San Juans. My math tells me I'm looking at ~12 Amp hours of use on busy day. Here's my rough plan, and I'd love any feedback or corrections:

Starting with a new 28AH powersonic, may be too small, considering 2x of them.

BlueSea terminal fuses: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00SE6Z2WI/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER
3 circuits from battery:
1) 10A fused automatic bilge pump. (overkill, but she may be seasonally in a slip)
2) 20A fused on/off 12v switch feeding a 4 gang panel
3) 5A fused PMW solar controller

Power switch: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000MTB7XS/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER
Panel: http://www.amazon.com/SeaSense-Switch-Panel-Breaker-Rubber/dp/B0009PYBKG/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1429571274&sr=1-1&keywords=seasense+breaker+panel
My complete system will include:
Masthead led anchor light (.2A)
deck level led nav lights (.3A)
DSC VHF + GPS mouse (1.2A receive, 5A broadcast)
3 LED cabin lights (.5A)
compass (.1A)
fathometer (.1A)
12V cig (???A)
dual usb charging slots (3A @5v)
auto bilge pump (5A)

Charging is via 40 watts of solar and (5A fused) Morningstar SG4 PWM controller.

What is the best way to protect that 12v cig socket? Put it on a dedicated gang switch on the panel? Otherwise gets lumped in the Accessories gang which shares a breaker with instruments, vhf, etc. I suppose I could connect directly to the 12V switch and fuse independently, maybe that's best?

One debate I'm having is over the auto bilge configuration, or simply using one of the panel gangs for the pump. The boat spends non-sailing days trailered and covered, but maybe not forever.

Where am I headed for trouble? Where can I do better?

Thanks in advance for all I've learned from your past threads!
r20 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 Old 04-20-2015
Once known as Hartley18
 
Classic30's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 5,179
Thanks: 52
Thanked 85 Times in 85 Posts
Rep Power: 14
   
Dock
Re: trailer sailer electrical refit: safety first advice

Hi r20, welcome to Sailnet.

It looks like you have an interesting project on your hands. My only suggestions would be:

1. Wire the auto bilge pump directly off the battery via one of these:



2. Wiring the cig socket off it's own breaker - even if it means going to a 5-gang.

Have fun!
travlineasy likes this.

-
A bad day on a boat beats a good day in the office
Classic30 is offline  
post #3 of 8 Old 04-21-2015
Senior Member
 
travlin-easy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Maryland - USA
Posts: 6,607
Thanks: 1
Thanked 121 Times in 107 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Re: trailer sailer electrical refit: safety first advice

There are rubber covers for the 12-V cigarette lighter sockets, some of which, such as those purchased at WM, come with the covers.

As for the batteries, they seem kinda light. I would go with a full size, deep cycle, marine battery. Would also go with a bit larger solar panel if you have the room. That 40-watt solar panel will not be putting out 40 watts for more than a couple hours during mid day, far less early and late in the day.

Those connections are fine in a freshwater lake, but in Puget Sound, the sail air will eat them alive unless you cover the connections with heat shrink tubing and silicone seal. That includes any screw connections as well - a dab of silicone sealant does wonders in maintaining those connections. Left unprotected, you may get a couple years out of them at best.

Good Luck,

Gary
travlin-easy is offline  
 
post #4 of 8 Old 04-21-2015 Thread Starter
r20
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 7
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Re: trailer sailer electrical refit: safety first advice

What is the right stuff to use for that? I've seen wd 40 anti-corrosion at the local hardware store. Is silicone better for electrical connections? silicone what?

I do have adhesive lined heat shrink tubing coming. My boat is too small to have hatches, so the panel is just on the bulkhead. It's open behind. I was considering using a tupperware type container, such that the lid is mounted to the back of the bulkhead, but I can remove the body anytime I need to swap fuses or whatever.

Or perhaps a small project box? What do people use if the panel isn't contained in a well sealed space? I figure 2 bus bars and the panel is most of what needs protecting.

thanks!
r20 is offline  
post #5 of 8 Old 04-21-2015
Senior Member
 
travlin-easy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Maryland - USA
Posts: 6,607
Thanks: 1
Thanked 121 Times in 107 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Re: trailer sailer electrical refit: safety first advice

In the past I've used RTV Silicone cement for coating the connections and nothing seemed to penetrate the sealant. I'm not familiar with the WD-40 product.

If you intend to mound that electrical panel outside, then it MUST be covered with something to protect it from spray and the weather. Any clear cover will work, but be sure it is vented at the bottom to prevent moisture forming from condensation. If the boat has a Bimini top, you may wish to consider installing an electronics box similar to those used with powerboats on Tee Tops. Or, you could install a recessed, covered box into the gunwale of the boat, which is fairly easy to to as well. I've seen them installed on cabin face bulkheads as well. The box can be spacious enough to hold your electrical panel and VHF Radio, yet still be almost flush with the bulkhead. They look something like a glove box in a car, but have a clear door.

Good luck,

Gary
travlin-easy is offline  
post #6 of 8 Old 04-22-2015
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: San Francisco Bay area
Posts: 3,182
Thanks: 9
Thanked 92 Times in 91 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Re: trailer sailer electrical refit: safety first advice

Suggest separate switches for anchor light, nav lights, and steaming light, for convenience. Then separate ones for instruments, vhf, 12v outlet, and cabin lights. You dont want a fault in one circuit, tripping the others. Then always have a spare, so we are up to 8.

Bristol 31.1, San Francisco Bay
MarkSF is offline  
post #7 of 8 Old 04-22-2015
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 19,763
Thanks: 82
Thanked 560 Times in 537 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
Re: trailer sailer electrical refit: safety first advice

To prevent terminal corrosion, I prefer dielectric grease. Naturally, it's greasy, but it works and is easily applied/removed.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Jeanneau 54DS

In the harsh marine environment, something is always in need of repair. Margaritas fix everything.
Minnewaska is offline  
post #8 of 8 Old 04-22-2015
Living the dream
 
ReefMagnet's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Mackay Qld AU
Posts: 345
Thanks: 6
Thanked 20 Times in 19 Posts
Rep Power: 12
 
Re: trailer sailer electrical refit: safety first advice

My $0.02 to add.

Mount corrosion prone stuff in an appropriately sized industrial weatherproof container behind the companionway where it will be out of the weather. Glands are used to prevent water ingress to the inside of the enclosure and you can even buy them with a door to allow fast access.

Terminate all connections with double wall heat shrink and slap silicon or lanolin grease on stuff (including light sockets) to provide corrosion protection.

Don't use a 20 amp switch for the main, use a 100 amp or so waterproof switch as used in many trailerable boats. Not for current capacity, but for reliability.

Wire your bilge pump on separate auto and manual circuits for redundancy and consider a manual pump accessible from the cockpit.

Your boat, being a trailer sailer, I'd buy the cheapest lead acid battery I could find at around 40 to 60 amp hours. It will give a good compromise on performance and price with fair warning when it is failing.

Last edited by ReefMagnet; 04-22-2015 at 07:56 AM.
ReefMagnet is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I need trailer sailer advice IwanaBrich Boat Review and Purchase Forum 5 04-28-2009 06:39 PM
Looking for a trailer sailer kruucks Boat Review and Purchase Forum 10 09-30-2008 08:39 AM
A new trailer sailer Giulietta General Discussion (sailing related) 33 05-27-2008 03:46 PM
looking for a trailer sailer hillbillybear Boat Review and Purchase Forum 28 03-27-2008 11:57 AM
Electrical refit Tequiza Terri Gear & Maintenance 3 06-17-2004 07:54 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome