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post #21 of 75 Old 08-06-2018
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Re: Connectors-Marine use?

On a different angle, I don't understand the affinity folks have to soldering. What makes it even seem desirable? My ratcheting crimper was not all that expensive. I don't recall exactly, but $30-$40 seems right. Makes a perfect crimp every time and I use it often. Cost per use is pennies by now. So much easier than heating up a soldering iron, then trying not to burn myself while using it upside down in the bilge, or burn anything down, while it cools.


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post #22 of 75 Old 08-06-2018
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Re: Connectors-Marine use?

Whenever possible, I solder all my connections, which are covered with heat shrink tubing, then a thin application of silicon cement. In more than 60 years on the water and 17 boats later, I have yet to have a single one of my soldered connections fail. I've had loads of crimped connections fail, though, and replaced every one of them with a soldered connection that held up long after I sold the boats. Sometime the ABYC isn't a reliable source, especially for this kind of stuff.

The connectors in the OP look great, and I for one, would not have a problem using them.

Good luck,

Gary
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post #23 of 75 Old 08-06-2018
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Re: Connectors-Marine use?

Folks who over crimp, with the scissor type crimpers, make bad connections all the time, as they are inclined to crush the connection into oblivion. I also cant believe how many household type connectors I find, usually on stuff added by the P.O. These are failure prone.

However, Ive never seen a proper marine adhesive connector fail, when crimped with a ratchet (that knows when to stop!). Im also sure I could make 10 crimps and clean up, before one could do a single solder connector, not to mention cool the iron down and put it away.

I once went crazy trying to troubleshoot a faulty electric head switch. It turned out, bundled in all the wires in the back, was a common connection of three wires, soldered and heat shrunk. The solder joint looked perfect, from the outside, after I cut away the wrapping. I cut it apart, respliced everything, with crimps, and its worked perfectly every since. Clearly, the solder joint failed inside. I had only previously heard of that unicorn, but am now a believer.
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post #24 of 75 Old 08-06-2018
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Re: Connectors-Marine use?

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Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Im also sure I could make 10 crimps and clean up, before one could do a single solder connector, not to mention cool the iron down and put it away.
Either you are an extremely fast crimper, or a very slow solderer. Just kiddin'

Gary
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Re: Connectors-Marine use?

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Originally Posted by travlin-easy View Post
Whenever possible, I solder all my connections, which are covered with heat shrink tubing, then a thin application of silicon cement. In more than 60 years on the water and 17 boats later, I have yet to have a single one of my soldered connections fail. I've had loads of crimped connections fail, though, and replaced every one of them with a soldered connection that held up long after I sold the boats. Sometime the ABYC isn't a reliable source, especially for this kind of stuff.

The connectors in the OP look great, and I for one, would not have a problem using them.

Good luck,

Gary
When i was in the Army, we would crimp any termination to a solidly mounted bit of kit, relays etc. as the vibration could weaken or break the strands where they met the solder. On an inline splice we would solder and heatshrink. I don't recall any problems with either. On my boat i do the same except i use glued heatshrink, which sets quite hard and i think eliminates the vibration issue.

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Re: Connectors-Marine use?

What is amazing is that most folks don't even consider the fact that every piece of electronic gear on the boat utilizes soldered connections and printed circuit boards where every component and connection is soldered. The failure rate on today's marine electronic gear is reportedly less than 1/100th of 1-percent. For this reason, most manufacturers no longer bench test electronic equipment before it goes out to distributors.

Gary
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Re: Connectors-Marine use?

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Interesting discussion. I don't use a spendy ratcheting crimper... but do heat shrink seal. I suspect some of my crimps are not the greatest... BUT I have had no failures at these connections that I am aware of. I think for light gauge non critical wiring connections... these may be fine. What the VAST majority of my crimps are wire to lug or ring connectors. Wires are usually cable tied to prevent them vibrating.

All large diameter connections were professionally made up...battery and engine high amp 12v.

Critical connections would be the bilge pump.
My crimper kit with case and two different dies cost about $75. I made this money back by building my own battery cables and such at the local chandlery using their hydraulic crimper.

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No, i have used hydraulic crimpers on larger cables and you will never get them to fuse. You may distort the shape as the strands get pushed together, probably a hex shape but not with any crimper you can operate with your hand.

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I think the strand size of the large cables makes a different situation where the wires won't meld. From Maine Sails site I see a cross section of a crimp where the wire looks like it welded but it really just became like a solid mass. It may not have fused but for connection purposes it looks like a solid wire.

He tests different strengths of connections. The crimped connection held 95 lbs and the heat shrink failed between 10 and 16 lbs. In the case of the heat shrink it was the stretching of the wire sheathing that causes failure.

I think these soldier joints would be great on a boat to use for emergency repairs until I could get my full wiring kit onboard and crimp it.

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post #28 of 75 Old 08-07-2018
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Re: Connectors-Marine use?

For those people experiencing broken wiring from vibration, how are you securing these wires, and how bad are your boats vibrating, twisting, and flexing? And why are some hanging large weights off their wire joins?

Regardless of how I make a wire join, it is always supported close by and I can't imagine a circumstance that would allow it to flex. We also have PVC plumbed heads and hard tube water plumbing with solid connections. No flexing or breaking there either - and we have a catamaran.

Seems like a lot of the talk about vibration and flexing of 1/4" wire joins is academic in nature. Or very bad installation practices.

Mark
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Re: Connectors-Marine use?

Everyone seems to have NEWLY just reinvented these things. But I've got some boxes from 3M that I must have gotten 20? years ago after reading about them in a NASA journal. Maybe the 3M patent has expired and that's why all of a sudden they are NEW from everyone.

They're not just watertight, if they are the real deal they are literally GAS TIGHT and 100% adhesive sealed inside the shrink tubing. 3M used to specify a particular infrared heat gun to properly set them but any heat gun used carefully seems to do.

Hey, they work. And like anything else out there...I'd trust the ones from 3M over anonymous ones from...the Middle Kingdom.
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post #30 of 75 Old 08-10-2018
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Re: Connectors-Marine use?

Very soon I will be doing a lot of wiring work on my boat. I like these connectors, from looking at the design and giving some thought into how much easier they are to use but more importantly how they will react with the vibration factor thrown in. I think any vibration that would do harm could be eliminated by securing the wires and assembly to something solid after they are connected and also adding one continuous piece of clear heat shrink over the entire assembly when finished. This may be over-kill but I dont like to take chances when it comes to marine environments. Especially things like,, the main bilge pump(s).
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