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post #21 of 49 Old 12-02-2015
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Re: The Yard Guys

Smak, is that a steering cable disappearing into a void next to the quadrant? do you get a yard guy to fish a replacement or trust it dosn't break?
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Re: The Yard Guys

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Smak, is that a steering cable disappearing into a void next to the quadrant? do you get a yard guy to fish a replacement or trust it dosn't break?
Yes - and no. It is a steering cable. And it does move through a hole there in the laz - but there is this big plate underneath the pedestal in the aft cabin...



So, it's all accessible. Hunter is pretty smart that way.

Last edited by smackdaddy; 12-02-2015 at 09:56 PM.
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post #23 of 49 Old 12-03-2015
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Re: The Yard Guys

Smacks' original post is also a pretty good tip for finding a good surveyor. Talk to the tech's and yard guys. They see them all and probably know the good from the bad.

The hysterical laughter you hear as you drive a way in your"new" boat ..... is the seller.
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post #24 of 49 Old 12-03-2015
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Re: The Yard Guys

This is probably a bit off topic, but it's a smack thread so here goes:

There are good yard guys, and bad yard guys IMHO. I've seen both. It isn't correlated at all with hourly rate, or fancy facilities. It's about people.

There are also good and bad yard managers and service managers. I've worked with only 3 yards in 40 years of boat ownership where I didn't need to check the work regularly and effectively be my own general/service manager, two of which got bought out by some corporate types and are not longer in this category. In my neighborhood, a great yard is the exception, not the rule. In situations when I've been with the wrong yard, I've had to figure out who in the yard knew anything, and insist they are assigned to my boat. Then watch closely, and be on scene regularly.

In defense of those in the business, anyone who's done their own work on their own boat knows that simple jobs that you'd guess will take 30 mins sometimes take all day when you get into them, and sometimes the job your dreaded job turns easy, and you cannot believe how well it goes. So I'm not talking about being over charged, and stuff like that, and sometimes owners can be cheap when this happens, and force the yard to cut corners. If that's you, you get what you pay for. I'm talking about doing it right rather than making it worse.

If/when you find the right guys, and the right yard, take care of them and show your appreciation. Pay up for the good work, it will pay off long term. In my experience it's rare. Truly experienced yard guys are invaluable, and under paid. No one makes big money working on boats.

And it's not that hard to figure out, the industry is so small that scuttlebutt will lead you to the good ones if you listen.
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post #25 of 49 Old 12-03-2015
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Re: The Yard Guys

A picture tells a thousand words. The Quadrant stop pic is interesting. here's what I see here.
1. crack in the shelf
2. A rudder stop that is corroded
3. A steering cable in poor condition.
Any time I see this combination I'm very suspect of that shelf. I would make no assumptions here . The corrosion on the stop is from water intrusion most likely allowing it to wick down through the fastenings. Also may be entering though the crack in the shelf.
The only way to trust the integrity would be to remove the stop and inspect the condition of the shelf.
If that is a stainless stop cleaning and painting would not be a proper repair.replace would be in order.
The corrosion on the steering cable is bad enough to change it period.
The dustiest dirtiest guy in the yard may not be the best source for advice. Forms such as this and owners associations pinpoint the most common faults of specific models. As long as you can filter thru opinions and observe facts.


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post #26 of 49 Old 12-03-2015
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Re: The Yard Guys

There are individual professionals and "yard guys". Either can work for someone else, nothing wrong with being an employee. If, for some reason, you cannot do your own work, then you better damn well know who is working on your boat.

Once, in all my boat owning days, I hired a yard to send a yard guy to work on my boat. It was an emergency haul out, no car, not sure I would need more tools or parts, and I was told I was not permitted to do my own work in that yard. I was there for most of the work, being a pain in the ass, making sure everything was done right. He was friendly and explained what he did or was doing along the way. After launch, he came out to my boat to check more than necessary. He got a generous tip.

Staring at a ball of wires, not knowing what the hell goes to what, must be scarey. When my mast is stepped/unstepped, I am there and I connect or disconnect everything. Anonymous "yard guys" don't touch my stuff. I prep the rigging for unstep, re-rig when stepped.

If I rip off my rudder, a "yard guy" sure as hell won't be putting my boat back together. I might have to hire someone if the work is beyond my scope, but my insurance company will be paying the best craftsman I can find to do the job. He might work for a yard, nothing wrong with that, but he will be the best I can get my mitts on.

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Re: The Yard Guys

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Originally Posted by dorymate1 View Post
A picture tells a thousand words. The Quadrant stop pic is interesting. here's what I see here.
1. crack in the shelf
2. A rudder stop that is corroded
3. A steering cable in poor condition.
Any time I see this combination I'm very suspect of that shelf. I would make no assumptions here . The corrosion on the stop is from water intrusion most likely allowing it to wick down through the fastenings. Also may be entering though the crack in the shelf.
The only way to trust the integrity would be to remove the stop and inspect the condition of the shelf.
If that is a stainless stop cleaning and painting would not be a proper repair.replace would be in order.
The corrosion on the steering cable is bad enough to change it period.
The dustiest dirtiest guy in the yard may not be the best source for advice. Forms such as this and owners associations pinpoint the most common faults of specific models. As long as you can filter thru opinions and observe facts.
Hey dory - thanks for the feedback.

One of my biggest gripes about his model of Hunter is that there is no drainage at all in the huge lazarette. Several that I had looked at prior to purchasing this one had standing water in the bottom of the laz. It apparently accumulates through failing sealant/bedding of the stanchions and other fittings (even the "shower" extension). So that is where the problem started.

I added drainage and made sure everything was as watertight as I could - and also added locks to the laz lids for being offshore. So it's much better.

The stops themselves are just regular steel angles...not stainless. They are bolted through the laz shelf and look to be glued in with 5200 or similar. There was a lot of surface rust as you can see, but they were still pretty thick. So I didn't think they needed to be replaced yet. But I am keeping an eye on them to make sure the new coating protects them and slows down the rust.

I did a close inspection of the cable. It's not corroded. It has some paint on it where it enters that hole, but it's in good shape from what I could see. It's another thing I'm keeping an eye on.

As I said above, though I'm not too worried about that crack as it appears to only be a superficial depth, I will keep an eye on it and have it inspected by a pro and repair it when I get a chance. If nothing else, I don't want more water wicking into that plywood.

Anyway, any of this stuff could obviously fail at some point if I've missed something (which is certainly not out of the realm of possibility). But the list always has to be prioritized.
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post #28 of 49 Old 12-03-2015
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Re: The Yard Guys

Yes, Smackdaddy's pics made me shudder too. Maybe it has all been fixed by now, but that kind of disrepair us what leads to disaster offshore. That corroded stop is scary in how it suggests more problems buried deeper. Stainless fitting should not be painted, BTW. The steering cable was destroyed by the paint that apparently got slobbed upon it. It must be replaced. The corroded, o,d, quadrant is suspicious. I would suspect it has some incipient cracking or failure in its future. The ragged hole around the cable points to some other problems with the steering or maintenance. Then there is the matter of the glossy clean stateroom. The owners priorities may be mixed up.

Having drains in lazarettes is a good thing to ponder as the drain works both ways. A shallow bilged boat, on extended offshore passage in weather, will accumulate some water in odd places that may not immediately drain to the pumps. An open drain hole in the bottom of a lazarette or storage locker may allow the water to enter. That water might ruin whatever is stored within the otherwise dry locker. Ask me how I know. I prefer lockers without open drains. Either no drain at all or a hole with a plug. I have a suction pump with a hose to reach anywhere in the boat that makes quick work of draining any accumulated water.

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post #29 of 49 Old 12-03-2015
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Re: The Yard Guys

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Originally Posted by dorymate1 View Post
The dustiest dirtiest guy in the yard may not be the best source for advice.
In my experience he seldom is - that's usually the guy that gets all the crappy jobs like scraping bottoms and humping blocking timber around the yard.

I, myself, personally intend to continue being outspoken and opinionated, intolerant of all fanatics, fools and ignoramuses, deeply suspicious of all those who have "found the answer" and on my bad days, downright rude.
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post #30 of 49 Old 12-03-2015
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Re: The Yard Guys

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In my experience he seldom is - that's usually the guy that gets all the crappy jobs like scraping bottoms and humping blocking timber around the yard.
We leave our returnables by the side of the dumpster for the dirtiest guy in our yard. He still ends up in their ripping open bags.

...I'm not kidding, there are members here who will vouch for me. I'd ask for his email so that Smack could contact him for electronics and glass repair advice, but I don't think he "does the email thing".
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