Bleed the fuel lines - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 10 Old 04-02-2017 Thread Starter
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Bleed the fuel lines

I had the fuel filter changed last week on my Yanmar 2GM20F engine. I ran it today for the first time since. It ran perfectly for about five minutes and cut out and wouldn't restart. I'm guessing there is air in the line? Is that the correct diagnosis? How difficult is it to bleed the line if that is the issue? Thanks very much!

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post #2 of 10 Old 04-02-2017
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Re: Bleed the fuel lines

Bleeding procedure is in your engine manual. If you don't have one you can download one here.

Also ensure that the gasket in your new fuel filter is properly seated.
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post #3 of 10 Old 04-02-2017
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Re: Bleed the fuel lines

Please don't take this the wrong way, but you HAD your fuel filter changed rather than doing it yourself? Do you know how to do it and simply didn't have time? What did you have to pay to have this elementary maintenance item done? Was it the primary or secondary, or did you have both changed?

Your question suggests you don't know how to change the filters, nor bleed the fuel system after the filters are changed. Knowing how to do these things is a safety issue. Loss of fuel prime is a common problem, and if it happens at the wrong time, responsive action can keep you, your ship, and your crew from dangers that would be passe´ with an operating engine. You don't take a service technician to sea with you...

Cnanging the filters and priming the system is mechanically simple, and easy with practice.

You probably need to prime the system. Do you have an electric fuel lift pump or a squeeze bulb installed, or do you rely on manual operation of the fuel lift pump to prime?

Good luck.

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Re: Bleed the fuel lines

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Originally Posted by fryewe View Post
Please don't take this the wrong way, but you HAD your fuel filter changed rather than doing it yourself? Do you know how to do it and simply didn't have time? What did you have to pay to have this elementary maintenance item done? Was it the primary or secondary, or did you have both changed?

Your question suggests you don't know how to change the filters, nor bleed the fuel system after the filters are changed. Knowing how to do these things is a safety issue. Loss of fuel prime is a common problem, and if it happens at the wrong time, responsive action can keep you, your ship, and your crew from dangers that would be passe´ with an operating engine. You don't take a service technician to sea with you...

Cnanging the filters and priming the system is mechanically simple, and easy with practice.

You probably need to prime the system. Do you have an electric fuel lift pump or a squeeze bulb installed, or do you rely on manual operation of the fuel lift pump to prime?

Good luck.
Seems rather harsh. I'm sure there was a time when you had to learn such a task and you may have already been sailing before learning how every last item on your boat worked. Is there risk involved in that, yes. Is it high, likely not. At least if the OP has an anchor and knows how to use that and can call for a tow and isn't far from shore, etc...

As for a good guide on diesel maintenance, the manual is a great choice. I would also highly recommend the Off Center Harbor diesel maintenance video series. Very clear and it covers all the basics.
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post #5 of 10 Old 04-02-2017
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Re: Bleed the fuel lines

I change the fuel filters myself yearly, but have found that, even though I bleed very carefully, it will still cut out after 5 or 10 minutes running. I then bleed it again, then all is fine for the next year. The second time is a simple matter of opening the bleed valve on the fuel pump on the engine. Only takes a sec, as I have an electric lift pump so the air bubble immediately gets pumped out.

I always run the engine for 20 mins after changing filters now.
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post #6 of 10 Old 04-02-2017
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Re: Bleed the fuel lines

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Originally Posted by marksf View Post
i always run the engine for 20 mins after changing filters now.
+1
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post #7 of 10 Old 04-03-2017
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Re: Bleed the fuel lines

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Seems rather harsh. I'm sure there was a time when you had to learn such a task...
Nahhh. Some people were born with silver spoons in their mouths. Me, I was born with a 13mm combination wrench (spanner for the continentals among you) in my hand.

Thought the OP might think it was a bit harsh, and that's why I asked that he not take it that way.

Maintenance opportunities are just that...an opportunity to learn. If you don't try, you never learn. If you try and it doesn't work out, then call someone to do it for you. Nothing lost. Gaining this type of skill and knowledge is satisfying (of course, I wouldn't know about that, because I never had to learn such a task, but others told me).

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post #8 of 10 Old 04-03-2017
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Re: Bleed the fuel lines

Maybe the OP has never had a diesel engine and so he's at the beginning of his learning curve? He'll learn. Asking questions is a good thing.
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post #9 of 10 Old 04-03-2017
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Re: Bleed the fuel lines

Hey,

I learned this the (almost) hard way. Had my first 'big boat' with inboard diesel. Splashed it in the spring and did my maintenance, including fuel filter. Ran it at the dock for 5 minutes and all was great. Then I motored to my mooring, tied up and before I could shut the motor down, she quit on me and would not restart. Then I learned about bleeding fuel lines. This was early in the spring and I had no sails on. It could have gotten ugly if the motor quit 5 minutes earlier.

Barry


Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkSF View Post
I change the fuel filters myself yearly, but have found that, even though I bleed very carefully, it will still cut out after 5 or 10 minutes running. I then bleed it again, then all is fine for the next year. The second time is a simple matter of opening the bleed valve on the fuel pump on the engine. Only takes a sec, as I have an electric lift pump so the air bubble immediately gets pumped out.

I always run the engine for 20 mins after changing filters now.

Barry Lenoble
Deep Blue C, 2002 C&C 110
Mt. Sinai, NY

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post #10 of 10 Old 04-03-2017
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Re: Bleed the fuel lines

Quote:
Originally Posted by fryewe View Post
Nahhh. Some people were born with silver spoons in their mouths. Me, I was born with a 13mm combination wrench (spanner for the continentals among you) in my hand.

Thought the OP might think it was a bit harsh, and that's why I asked that he not take it that way.

Maintenance opportunities are just that...an opportunity to learn. If you don't try, you never learn. If you try and it doesn't work out, then call someone to do it for you. Nothing lost. Gaining this type of skill and knowledge is satisfying (of course, I wouldn't know about that, because I never had to learn such a task, but others told me).
Apparently I'm a little more mechanically inclined than most of my peers as well. However, I'll have to confess that I'm not as conversant with my iron genny as I should or as I'd like to be. So my remark wasn't entirely altruistic. However, I do make sure that I have a backup plan (or two), in case all hell breaks loose. I also am in the process of doing everything myself, so although I need notes at this point, it won't be long before it will seem as though I've always known it.

"Education is that which remains, if one has forgotten everything he learned in school." -- Einstein quoting a wit
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