Is there a difference in shape between hank and roller furler sail? - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 17 Old 07-06-2018 Thread Starter
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Is there a difference in shape between hank and roller furler sail?

My roller furler is old and crappy and I'm thinking of removing it and converting my jib and genoa to hank-on.

Are they going to be a less-than-ideal shape? Perhaps I'm better off selling them as used sails and then getting actual hank-on sails.
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post #2 of 17 Old 07-06-2018
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Re: Is there a difference in shape between hank and roller furler sail?

In theory, a foresail could be the same shape, but have no idea what you have. Furling mainsails typically lack a roach and horizontal battens, unless boom furled.

Personally, I would spend the money tuning up the furling system. Your boat will retain more value that way as well.


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post #3 of 17 Old 07-06-2018
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Re: Is there a difference in shape between hank and roller furler sail?

https://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-...ails-hank.html

I would def have a sailmaker take a look at your sail...

I much prefer hank on except for one HUGE difference: when the wind pipes up, it's awfully nice not to have to go forward to deal with a big sail. We found that sail changes - by definition - ALWAYS occurred when you least wanted to be struggling to work on foredeck. And tho true that a bigger boat is more forgiving (pitching and hobby-horsing less), the sails also go up in size making them an even bigger handful.

So... I don't like how a roller reefed sail 'sets' (in comparison to a dedicated hank-on 70% or even storm), the convenience of getting it done quickly and safely from the cockpit has won out for us.
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post #4 of 17 Old 07-06-2018
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Re: Is there a difference in shape between hank and roller furler sail?

I would imagine if you paid someone to sew hanks on your genoa, that you would be better off selling the furling sail, and buying a hanked sail. There is a good supply of hanked sails available used because most people are going in the other direction (selling hanked to get furled).

The furling sail may be cut to a different shape. The luff is almost certainly shorter than you could have with hanked, in order to fit the furling gear under the tack.

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post #5 of 17 Old 07-06-2018
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Re: Is there a difference in shape between hank and roller furler sail?

You don't mention how big your boat is or what sort of sailing you do.
This would make a big difference in whether I chose hanked on sails or RF.
Basically, if you sail in sheltered waters a couple of times a month, I'd think hank on headsails would be fine, but if you were into extended cruises, especially short-handed, where you might get into some heavy weather and seas above 2', then I'd stick with the RF, at any cost.
If you'd ever had to wrestle down a big headsail and change it out for a smaller one, in winds over 20 knots and with the bow pitching heavily, I doubt you'd be considering going back to hank on sails. Not only is it not a whole lot of fun to be on the foredeck in those conditions, it is downright dangerous.
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post #6 of 17 Old 07-06-2018 Thread Starter
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Re: Is there a difference in shape between hank and roller furler sail?

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Originally Posted by capta View Post
You don't mention how big your boat is or what sort of sailing you do.
This would make a big difference in whether I chose hanked on sails or RF.
Basically, if you sail in sheltered waters a couple of times a month, I'd think hank on headsails would be fine, but if you were into extended cruises, especially short-handed, where you might get into some heavy weather and seas above 2', then I'd stick with the RF, at any cost.
If you'd ever had to wrestle down a big headsail and change it out for a smaller one, in winds over 20 knots and with the bow pitching heavily, I doubt you'd be considering going back to hank on sails. Not only is it not a whole lot of fun to be on the foredeck in those conditions, it is downright dangerous.
I forgot to mention it's a Newport 30 Mkii, and I sail with my wife and small children in/near the Georgia Strait (Vancouver - Gulf Islands, etc).
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Re: Is there a difference in shape between hank and roller furler sail?

I'm going to be the generally dissenting opinion. Yes generally hank on sails will have way better shape. Mostly due to the fact that they can now be shaped for ideal efficiency, and not shaped to furl better.

Yep, furling is easier when the winds pipe up. But then you are supposed to reef early and before you know you have to (remember?)... so you already switched down to a smaller headsail too right?

But in more seriousness, hank on will generally be more efficient in a given range. Furling sure can shorten sail, but of course will also ruin shape... but hey you didn't have to go forward!

Which is it? Efficiency and speed, or easy and slow?

But but but, race boats have furlers too!!! yes they do, but if you look most only have 1 sized headsail, and its usually only 100%. Also they have compromised their headsails to make flying an asymmetrical easier (usually on a prodder).

So is there REALLY a compromise? yes, a Mark IV furler, that takes tuff luff and allows for headsail changes for racing... if you get in a pinch you can still furl and shorten sail.

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post #8 of 17 Old 07-06-2018
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Re: Is there a difference in shape between hank and roller furler sail?

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Originally Posted by driggers View Post
I forgot to mention it's a Newport 30 Mkii, and I sail with my wife and small children in/near the Georgia Strait (Vancouver - Gulf Islands, etc).
Depending on your wife's sailing experience you are more or less single handing. Even if you wife is a skilled sailor someone has to watch the kids, you are single handling, with extra burdens. Get your furler and a furling headsail working for you.

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post #9 of 17 Old 07-09-2018 Thread Starter
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Re: Is there a difference in shape between hank and roller furler sail?

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Originally Posted by SailingUphill View Post
So is there REALLY a compromise? yes, a Mark IV furler, that takes tuff luff and allows for headsail changes for racing... if you get in a pinch you can still furl and shorten sail.
That sounds more expensive than a plain cruiser's furler. You mean this harken MKIV, right? https://www.harken.com/productdetail...5466&taxid=547
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post #10 of 17 Old 07-09-2018
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Re: Is there a difference in shape between hank and roller furler sail?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SailingUphill View Post
I'm going to be the generally dissenting opinion. Yes generally hank on sails will have way better shape. Mostly due to the fact that they can now be shaped for ideal efficiency, and not shaped to furl better.

Yep, furling is easier when the winds pipe up. But then you are supposed to reef early and before you know you have to (remember?)... so you already switched down to a smaller headsail too right?

But in more seriousness, hank on will generally be more efficient in a given range. Furling sure can shorten sail, but of course will also ruin shape... but hey you didn't have to go forward!

Which is it? Efficiency and speed, or easy and slow?

But but but, race boats have furlers too!!! yes they do, but if you look most only have 1 sized headsail, and its usually only 100%. Also they have compromised their headsails to make flying an asymmetrical easier (usually on a prodder).

So is there REALLY a compromise? yes, a Mark IV furler, that takes tuff luff and allows for headsail changes for racing... if you get in a pinch you can still furl and shorten sail.
Sort of! The most efficient shaped sails are sails designed for an optimum flying shape when supported on a headfoil whether on a furler. Of course in order to have a optimum flying shape they are not designed to be flown partially furled.

Hank on sails have their own design problems because the luff needs to be sufficiently stretchy to allow cloth at the luff the sail to be tensioned enough to flatten the luff of the sail and to avoid big scallops between the hanks in a strong breeze, and yet stiff enough to avoid stretching and causing scallops. Because of that, hank on jibs are often made with slightly greater luff curve to allow it to be straightened and flattened in a breeze.

The problem with the original poster's idea is that his jib was probably cut flat to use partially furled and so converting to hanks won't produce an ideal sail shape either. Some of the answer lies with the condition of the original sail. If its old and tired, there is no point modifying it. But if its in good shape, then adding hanks may be viable. I would certainly request that the hanks be closely spaced so that the sail doesn't require too much halyard tension in a breeze. And frankly, if all that the Original Poster is doing is messing about on an older boat, he might get away with adding hanks to his old sail.

If The OP wants to get fancy he can add a downhaul that will allow him to douse the Jib from the cockpit, and maybe even add a reef point so he can simply partially lower the jib and reef it which is way easier and almost as effective than doing a sail change, and way better than sailing with a partially furled jib.

Jeff
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