Is the boat yard screwing you? stories - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 68 Old 09-08-2018
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Re: Is the boat yard screwing you? stories

What is the brand/model and year of your boat?

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post #12 of 68 Old 09-08-2018
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Re: Is the boat yard screwing you? stories

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeB View Post
What is the brand/model and year of your boat?
George,

The owner’s profile says it’s a Newport 30 Mk2, so it’s from the 70’s.
That pic looks like a typical strut and shaft for a Newport 30 with an Atomic 4 engine, except for the fiberglass around the strut.

Any surveyor would have examined that strut and shaft. Wrapping a strut in fiberglass is a sure sign of previous damage to the strut and maybe the hull.

Judy

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Last edited by jblumhorst; 09-08-2018 at 02:20 PM. Reason: Added comment about surveyor.
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post #13 of 68 Old 09-08-2018
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Re: Is the boat yard screwing you? stories

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Originally Posted by driggers View Post
....The man is about 85 and he even called me last year to wish me a merry xmas. If he's playing dumb he's a pathological liar (no other motivation) and an incredible actor. I'm sure he's being honest with me.
85 doesn't need to be a liar to fail to get the story straight.

New struts can be made, which is your fate. Let us know if the old one was just glassed over. It seems very unlikely that it is solid glass.


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Re: Is the boat yard screwing you? stories

A strut that was in sound condition wouldnít break during an engine replacement. Itís not fair to blame the yard for breaking a strut that was already in bad condition.

If you donít keep a zinc on the strut, itíll waste away.

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post #15 of 68 Old 09-08-2018
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Re: Is the boat yard screwing you? stories

Judy -
Thanks for the look-up. I usually don't go into the owner's profiles as most don't seem to post any useful information. I think the owner needs to post this question on an owner association website. I know that a lot of boat builders back in the 60's and 70's weren't building to the same common practices of today (I race on a Cal 40 and that is an eye-opener) and I wouldn't be surprised that fiberglass strut was period to the boat's construction. It would cost a "modern" boat yard a lot more in labor to fabricate and align a fiberglass strut than to simply bolt on a new bronze one. Anyway, a simple way to check on this is to look at the strut location from the inside of the boat. If there is resin oozing up from old bolt holes or similar repair evidence, then the boat originally had a metal strut. If not, I'd keep it as is if it isn't fractured. The owner might be needlessly opening a whole new can of worms, if the strut doesn't need replacing. Besides, right now, he has one fewer zinc to worry about.

-George
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post #16 of 68 Old 09-08-2018
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Re: Is the boat yard screwing you? stories

It is entirely possible that the original strut was made of fiberglass. I recently discovered that my cutlass bearing housing was made completely of fiberglass and that's the way they came from the factory. Also found several powerboats with fiberglass struts, so apparently, it's not a rare thing. Might want to check with the manufacturer or their spec sheets to find out if this is the case.

Good luck,

Gary
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post #17 of 68 Old 09-08-2018
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Re: Is the boat yard screwing you? stories

Quote:
Originally Posted by travlin-easy View Post
It is entirely possible that the original strut was made of fiberglass. I recently discovered that my cutlass bearing housing was made completely of fiberglass and that's the way they came from the factory. Also found several powerboats with fiberglass struts, so apparently, it's not a rare thing. Might want to check with the manufacturer or their spec sheets to find out if this is the case.

Good luck,

Gary
Gary -
What year and model Morgan sail boat do you have? What does your cutlass bearing housing look like? Is it stern tube? Stern tubes aka shaft logs are usually surrounded by fiberglass, and are molded as part of the hull.


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post #18 of 68 Old 09-08-2018
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Re: Is the boat yard screwing you? stories

I have had mixed experiences with boat yards. Some were really good. Some were really bad.

My worst experience was when I was trying to sell my first cruising boat, a Grampian 30. She was a nice capable boat, but my wife was pregnant and we were live aboards, so we decided to upsize, without having a buyer for the old Grampian.

Grampian had a pretty reliable atomic 4, but as luck would have it, the first potential buyer showed up and the engine WOULD NOT START! Had always been reliable for me.

So now I am doubled up on boats and mooring/storage fees and winter is coming. I took it to my local marina and said, engine wont start, please fix it. They told me a mechanic would be out right on it. A $110/hr mechanic would be cheaper than a winters storage, by a lot.

Winter came and they said they couldnt find the problem. Spring came and they couldnt find the problem. Now I am getting desperate. Any way, a freind of mine who worked at the marina overheard the mechanic assigned to my boat boasting that he knew what the problem was, the boat was in otherwise good shape and instead of fixing the problem he would offer me $500 for the boat so I didnt need to pay more storage, then fix the boat and flip it.

So, I hired another mechanic, who wasnt authorised to work at the marina and agreed to come after hours and take a look. I was there with him while he worked. This guy knew atomic 4s and fpund a timing issue in about 10 minutes, fixed it in 20. He charged me about $130.

I went to the marina manager the next day and said my boat was fixed and I no longer required their services. Manager said I owed them billable hours. I told the marina manager the storey. He was a reasonable guy and asked me if he could have a couple of days to look into it. I said fine.

He got back to me in about an hour and said that I would not owe them any further money and I could keep the boat there for a week or two to try and sell it.

With a running engine, I had no trouble selling her for close to what I paid for her, less a winters storage.
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post #19 of 68 Old 09-08-2018
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Re: Is the boat yard screwing you? stories

By far, the worst boatyard I've encpountered in 40 years of sailing is [Edit] Fl.

The owner offers "bottom job specials" at a low price, then does a bait and switch once you're on the stands. He pressures you to get sandblasting and an epoxy barrier coat -- not actually needed unless you have bad blisters -- and slow walks you if you resist. He wants several thousand dollars extra for the work.

If you continue to resist, he hits you with a huge bill for sanding the bottom -- mine was $1,400 -- and piles on extra charges that were not part of the original estimate.

There are also complaints around the Internet and in marinas and sailing clubs about questionable work, inflated labor charges,, etc. My estimated $500 cutless bearing replacement on a Catalina 320 turned into an $1,800 job in the hands of his expert yard crew.

Word is getting around [edit], but owners of large boats such as catamarans are stuck because he has the only Travel Lift in St. Pete big enough to haul them. Some owners of large boats are starting to go to Tampa to avoid having to do business with [Edit].

If you're considering [Edit], you can find complaints at activecaptain.com, Google, Yelp, ripoffreport.com and probably other web sites.

Last edited by Donna_F; 09-09-2018 at 11:57 AM. Reason: Edited pending moderator review of thread.
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post #20 of 68 Old 09-09-2018 Thread Starter
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Re: Is the boat yard screwing you? stories

To those discussing the problem I orginally posted about, see the update on OP. All bets are off and I now know nothing about where the fiberglass shaft strut came from.
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