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PnwReacher 04-21-2019 03:39 AM

Best jib sizes/sail plan for 27' sloop
 
Long time listener, first time caller (first time in a while anyway).

Getting a couple of new headsails cut for the Santana 27, and interested in thoughts on the exact combination. It's right now got a 135 only, on a furler.

I want more heavy weather capability, so I'm thinking a 135 or a 140 plus a 90 or 100, with roller reefing padding on both.

Am I really going to notice the difference between 135 & 140? Will the bigger sail mess up my sheeting? (My car tracks run back almost to the sheet winches)

I'd rather have a little bit too big of a gap between the two sails, and end up a bit underpowered if I shift down to the smaller sail early, but in exchange be able to handle a bit heavier weather. But is that too big a gap though? Or is 90 smaller than I'm frankly going to need to be able to keep some canvas in 25/30? (Currently in that range I've ended up under main only, w/three reefs)



Any thoughts appreciated.

PaulinVictoria 04-21-2019 05:49 AM

Re: Best jib sizes/sail plan for 27' sloop
 
I sail with a 115 up front, I don't give up much in medium air really, and almost nothing when it's really light as the 150 hangs there looking dumb (don't race, and I could get a code 0 I guess), but it will furl to 80 or 90% without losing much shape. Main has a single reef. Typically I can cope with a full foresail and a reefed main to 20kts, then furl in some foresail to 25. Above that, I go home but the boat would likely sail just fine with a deeper furl, or even dropping the main. Note that I sail almost exclusively single-handed.
To my mind, a 135 is a good all-round sail if you just have the one. If you are going to get a heavy weather sail then you might as well get a 150 up for lighter stuff and hope you get a chance to switch down to the smaller sail before it gets too snotty.

capta 04-21-2019 12:14 PM

Re: Best jib sizes/sail plan for 27' sloop
 
We love our Yankee cut jib. It's big enough to keep this old 777,000# gal footing along at a pretty good clip alone, but adding the main and she really pops. We really like that we can see under it on all points of sail, and this is of major importance if one is sailing in crowded sailing grounds.
I will admit our 120 o 150 is kinda fun down here in the trades this season, but it has been a very mild winter (wind wise), and in a normal one, we couldn't have flown it even a couple of days. And it does obscure the whole forward quarter of the boat it is flying on, causing more near misses in one season than we've had in 7.

SchockT 04-21-2019 01:38 PM

Re: Best jib sizes/sail plan for 27' sloop
 
On my Santana 30 we used about a 135 the vast majority of the time, and the boat still powered up well in moderate wind. I had a kevlar 150 for racing, but it was too much power in anything more that light wind if we didn't have crew on the rail. We had an old heavy #3 that we used if we had to beat in 20kts plus. We never roller reefed the headsail.

Sheeting angles shouldn't be a problem if you have long Genoa tracks. Back then boats were designed to carry an inventory of different headsails. The only time you may run into trouble is if you try to fly a sail that is cut too high in the clew, because the higher that clew is, the further back your Genoa car needs to be. I agree with Capta that a high cut like a Yankee is nice for visibility, as long as it is within the limitations of your lead angles. Keep in mind you will also sacrifice sail area with a higher clew.

Since you are getting brand new sails made your sailmaker should be able to come up with a perfect fit.

Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk

PnwReacher 04-21-2019 08:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SchockT (Post 2051597350)
On my Santana 30 we used about a 135 the vast majority of the time, and the boat still powered up well in moderate wind. I had a kevlar 150 for racing, but it was too much power in anything more that light wind if we didn't have crew on the rail. We had an old heavy #3 that we used if we had to beat in 20kts plus. We never roller reefed the headsail.

Sheeting angles shouldn't be a problem if you have long Genoa tracks. Back then boats were designed to carry an inventory of different headsails. The only time you may run into trouble is if you try to fly a sail that is cut too high in the clew, because the higher that clew is, the further back your Genoa car needs to be. I agree with Capta that a high cut like a Yankee is nice for visibility, as long as it is within the limitations of your lead angles. Keep in mind you will also sacrifice sail area with a higher clew.

Since you are getting brand new sails made your sailmaker should be able to come up with a perfect fit.

Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk


SchockT that is great information. For reference, how much wind speed do you find you can handle with the #3?

I am assuming by the way that by a #3 you mean a working jib just large enough to fill the fore triangle (just under 100%).

Any other information you could add about how she handles with that sail would be of interest, including the wind speed you switch to the smaller sail at and what your main reef setup is.

PnwReacher 04-21-2019 08:46 PM

Also SchockT, would be interested to know how she behaves with that #3 when you get overpowered, too, if you care to share.

SchockT 04-22-2019 11:28 PM

Re: Best jib sizes/sail plan for 27' sloop
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by PnwReacher (Post 2051597428)
SchockT that is great information. For reference, how much wind speed do you find you can handle with the #3?

I am assuming by the way that by a #3 you mean a working jib just large enough to fill the fore triangle (just under 100%).

Any other information you could add about how she handles with that sail would be of interest, including the wind speed you switch to the smaller sail at and what your main reef setup is.

Keep in mind that my Santana 30 is quite a different boat from your Mull designed 27, albeit similar era.

Yes, our #3 was a 100%. We carried it in winds over 20kts with a full main. (We had a hydraulic backstay so we were able to really flatten the main with mast bend)

Our main was set up with 2 reef points, but we never used them. We never had occasion to sail in more than 25kts. It just doesnt get much windier than that around here unless it's a storm. If the need arose I have no doubt the #3 with a double reef would handle the worst.

Our boat was also very well behaved with a headsail and no main, so we sometimes used that configuration if we were feeling lazy.



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