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-   -   Is tinned boat wire necessary? (https://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/329450-tinned-boat-wire-necessary.html)

john61ct 05-10-2019 02:07 AM

Re: Is tinned boat wire necessary?
 
No one's talking about "tinning" anything ourselves, but purchasing boat wire that's already been tinned along the whole length each strand as part of the manufacturing.

Doesn't even cost more per foot than the same grade cable untinned.

And forget solder full stop, proper milspec crimping shop here. . .

SeanM26 05-10-2019 02:50 AM

So twisted lamp cord wrapped in duct tape is bad...

colemj 05-10-2019 08:30 AM

Re: Is tinned boat wire necessary?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by riggy001 (Post 2051601046)
Use your best judgement as to exposure and either tin your tips or don't. I would. It can never hurt, and flux core solder is dirt cheap.

Actually, tinning tips can be harmful. I recently installed a few pieces of gear where a trimmed wire end is inserted into a clamp terminal and the terminal tightened down on the wire end. In all cases, the instructions had a separate warning section in bold type that said DO NOT TIN THE WIRE ENDS.

Besides, what good is tinning the tips if the rest of the wire can corrode?

Mark

pdqaltair 05-10-2019 09:52 AM

Re: Is tinned boat wire necessary?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by colemj (Post 2051601070)
Actually, tinning tips can be harmful. I recently installed a few pieces of gear where a trimmed wire end is inserted into a clamp terminal and the terminal tightened down on the wire end. In all cases, the instructions had a separate warning section in bold type that said DO NOT TIN THE WIRE ENDS.

Besides, what good is tinning the tips if the rest of the wire can corrode?

Mark

The specific problem they are referring to is that with certain terminal types, the solder can soften with vibration and repeated heating/cooling, causing the connection to loosen. Thus the common admonition to not tin wire ends. This is quite distinct from using tinned wire, which is good practice.

SeanM26 05-10-2019 10:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by colemj (Post 2051601070)
Quote:

Originally Posted by riggy001 (Post 2051601046)
Use your best judgement as to exposure and either tin your tips or don't. I would. It can never hurt, and flux core solder is dirt cheap.

Actually, tinning tips can be harmful. I recently installed a few pieces of gear where a trimmed wire end is inserted into a clamp terminal and the terminal tightened down on the wire end. In all cases, the instructions had a separate warning section in bold type that said DO NOT TIN THE WIRE ENDS.

Besides, what good is tinning the tips if the rest of the wire can corrode?

Mark

A properly crimped connection actually creates a metal-metal colloidal bond at the surface between the wire and the terminal. If you tin the end that will connected you prevent the strands from arranging themselves correctly and from actually contacting the connector directly.

svinshallah 05-11-2019 03:41 PM

Re: Is tinned boat wire necessary?
 
With ABYC screw-down connections, there is supposed to be a small plate in the connector that the screws tights on. The plate then compresses the wire. If you tin the end of the wire, it becomes solid which prevents the plate from compressing the wire. Iíve occasionally ďbunch tinnedĒ about 1/16Ē on the very end of small wires to make sure that I donít get loose strands pushed back when the wire is inserted. With most types of mechanical connections, soldering only makes things worse.

Minnesail 05-13-2019 12:40 PM

Re: Is tinned boat wire necessary?
 
It is my understanding that you really shouldn't solder anything on a boat. If you feel like you're getting loose strands aren't you doing something wrong?

Anyway, we're talking about tinned wire. Nothing to do with solder.

svinshallah 05-13-2019 01:04 PM

Re: Is tinned boat wire necessary?
 
In general, Iím in agreement with Minnesail: itís almost always better to do a proper crimp connection with the appropriate terminals and tools. But Colemj made a point about not using solder on the ends of wires that are inserted into screw-down terminal blocks. Heís right, you usually donít need or want it. My point was that sometimes, where itís difficult to see that there are no loose strands pushed out of the wire when itís inserted into a block, one can use a little bit of solder at the very end of the wire just to hold the strands together. Itís a sometimes-useful technique when you canít see to insert the wires.


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