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post #21 of 50 Old 05-08-2019
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If youre buying a hank thats x length and plan to quarter it..allow 8 ft for splices
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post #22 of 50 Old 05-08-2019
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Re: Docklines - How long should they be?

I’m with Jeff H here.except the line itself I leave my permanent lines in the slip and all are 35x /4 double braid
The springs are 50 ft. We have a mid ship cleat which is moveable on the jib tracks.

For traveling we have longer 50 foot lines as we don’t know of we take a slip it’s dimensions or tide ranges.
Also we raft up with other boats often so having a few extra long lines has been helpful


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post #23 of 50 Old 05-09-2019
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Re: Docklines - How long should they be?

We have 6 ea. 1/2” color-coded dock lines of different lengths, specific to their location, that stay on the dock. We carry about half a dozen 35’, mostly 3-strand, 1/2” docklines when we are cruising. We also carry 2 longer lengths that do not have eye splices. Our midship cleats are Shaefer models that are mounted on our outboard genoa tracks.

We have a corner dock wheel that is critical to our docking, as we back alongside our floating dock, using a spring line that we loop onto a midship cleat. Since the predominant wind has us on the lee side of the dock and there are no tie-off piles, this arrangement makes all the difference, especially since we often are docking in shallow water with the keel and rudder retracted.
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post #24 of 50 Old 05-09-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Docklines - How long should they be?

Thank you everyone

I thought there might be some Dock Queen Nazi Rule or something but apparently not, so than you for your individual experience.

I am re-reading everything and will make a plan in the next few days. I cant do anything now because its a bit stormy here so I can't measure exactly my current lines


My current lines at too think: 3 strand nylon 25mm = 1 inch. I have 2 long ones and 2 short.
I want to cut the diameter down to 12mm = 1/2 inch, 2 long, 2 short.

Reasons are to fit the winches, reduce weight of the long, reduce diameter so they fit the cleats easier. I will be retaining the old 1 inch lines for stormy use.

Length:
I like what people said about the long ones needing to be quite long. often on transient docks the cleats are not at all well placed being designed for a variety of different sized boats. As a solo sailor one can't stuff around when dock crashing... the lines cant be 6 inches short.
I have bow, midships and aft cleats. I often use the amidships boat cleat to take a turn around and run the springs fore and aft from that. So a long line cleated in the middle needs to be able to get to the other end of the boat plus a few feet to tie off/make a bowline.
For my boat at 40 feet the line needs to be 40 foot + midships cleating + 6 foot bow and 6ft stern for cleating = 54 feet?

The short lines 20 foot + 6ft + 6ft = 34feet ? (Currently the short lines are 8 meters = 26 feet)


Type of rope:
3 strand twist 12mm = 2300 kg breaking strain
12 plait hollow braid made of high tenacity polyester 12mm = 3300kg breaking
Price is about the same.
BLACK PEARL POLYESTER - Cousin Trestec - Rope Manufacturer for Industry and Sports


Weight:
The 1 inch lines should weigh 435 grams / meter
12mm braid 90 grams/meter
So the long ones would be 16 meters, say 8kgs/17 pounds for the 1 inch compared with 1.4kgs/3 pounds for the 12mm. A hell of a lot lighter! So much lighter I will check for a mistake there!


The end point will be 2 long lines adaptable for anything. 2 short lines, but longer than the old ones. Lines much lighter and easier to use, fitting winches and cleats much better. A reserve of older lines for storms, laying up etc.

Only think would be to get some of the lines in a different colour to clearly identify lengths as someone suggested.

Or thats what Im thinking now ....

Mark
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post #25 of 50 Old 05-09-2019
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Re: Docklines - How long should they be?

Mark,
Having lines which can work with your cleat sizes and chocks/fairleads is critical... as well as being winch compatible. Nylon has more elasticity than dacron/polyester and will be easier on your cleats. Definitely save your old lines. A large loop at one end is a good idea as well. For really long lines (presumably rarely used) can you tie two lines together.. or slip the two loops together???? Braided line seems to remain more flexible with time and color coding is a great idea.

Let us know!
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post #26 of 50 Old 05-09-2019
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Re: Docklines - How long should they be?

Some good info here, and as stated each boat will have specific needs. I'll add for single-handers, a modification I use to one of my longer lines, I add a small spliced loop to one end, large enough to fit over one end of the horn of a cleat on the dock, but small enough not to drop over both ends of the horns. I use this to spring the stern out by cleating the boat at the bow and looping the small loop over the back horn of a dock cleat somewhere around mid-ship, power forward springing the stern out, go into reverse and back into the fairway, as you back out the small loop slips off the horn freeing you from the dock, you can then go forward to open water and retrieve the short line with the loop at your leisure. Works slick, you are at the helm all the time, no worries about fouling your prop, and without the need to cast off any lines.

I'll add I like nylon, brait, 5/8", I use hydraulic line sleeve material in different diameters for chafe protection. My boat is 36' LOD, and somewhere around 19,000 lbs., I keep a min. 4 bow and stern, 2 mid-ship, and 2 extra long for big tides and warping. I like the color coding thought.
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post #27 of 50 Old 05-09-2019
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Re: Docklines - How long should they be?

1. Always use the Nylon line.
2. Twisted has a more elastic ability to act as a 'shock absorbers' and is easy to splice by age-old techniques.
3. Braided is easier to work with, but requires different skills to make splices. It's also more expensive.
4. Length: minimum is the LOA or length of your boat. Longer lines can be easily coiled and give you more options for their use. Also, it depends on your situation. A large tidal range and transiting locks will require longer lines. Use local knowledge.
5. Size: Thinner line stretches more and reduces stresses on your boat's fittings, but this is good if the tension does not reach the safe working load of the line. How do you know? Local knowledge, marina rules, and manufacturer's data. When in doubt move up to the next larger size.

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post #28 of 50 Old 05-09-2019
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Another plus for 3 strand is that you can still splice it after its been heavily used.
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post #29 of 50 Old 05-09-2019
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Re: Docklines - How long should they be?

One thing I found handy for transient docks was Davis Dock Rings. They make a cleat on the dock wherever you need one. That way, the length of your transient dock line doesn't matter as you can put the cleat where you want it.

I kept an after bow spring line (spliced eye fwd, dock ring w/ taut-line hitch aft) in the anchor locker, a forward quarter spring (sliced eye aft, dock ring w/ taut line hitch fwd) in the sail locker, and a short midships breast line to attach to a genoa traveller car rail mounted cleat to whatever cleat was on the dock, or a piling.

Not sure if they still make them since I could not find them on "davisinstruments.com" but a google search revealed plenty for sale. I commend a minimum of 2, and 4 is better, but 3 is what you might most often use in a transient situation tying only alongside (e.g.- on a fuel dock) and not in a slip.
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post #30 of 50 Old 05-10-2019
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Re: Docklines - How long should they be?

Quote:
Originally Posted by riggy001 View Post
One thing I found handy for transient docks was Davis Dock Rings. They make a cleat on the dock wherever you need one. That way, the length of your transient dock line doesn't matter as you can put the cleat where you want it.

I kept an after bow spring line (spliced eye fwd, dock ring w/ taut-line hitch aft) in the anchor locker, a forward quarter spring (sliced eye aft, dock ring w/ taut line hitch fwd) in the sail locker, and a short midships breast line to attach to a genoa traveller car rail mounted cleat to whatever cleat was on the dock, or a piling.

Not sure if they still make them since I could not find them on "davisinstruments.com" but a google search revealed plenty for sale. I commend a minimum of 2, and 4 is better, but 3 is what you might most often use in a transient situation tying only alongside (e.g.- on a fuel dock) and not in a slip.
Clever but might be a little wimpy... and require the board spacing and construction to permit insertion... AND they seem to take longer to untie when you are casting off... especially when under tension...

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