Fiberglass checks - Page 3 - SailNet Community
 13Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 32 Old 05-11-2019 Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 85
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 1
 
Re: Fiberglass checks

Quote:
Originally Posted by overbored View Post
is the boat in a yard that will let you do the work? do you know how to do the work? do you have a couple of friends that are going to help you? do you have the equipment that it will take to do the work? do you realize how long it will take to do the work? if you think so then triple it. and it will even take longer then that. it is not just the time to do the work you also need to include the time to get ready to do the work, gather the supplies and material and tools. the time to prep yourself and the environment where you are doing the work so you do not apply the finish to yourself or the neighbors boat. boats are tall, remember you will be doing some of the work from a ladder or scaffolding which cost money and tend to grow legs at night and can walk away. and the rest of the work will be done bent over looking up and holding a sanding board over your head and moving it back and forth for hours if you arm can handle that. and then after all that stuff you need to include the time it will take you to recover from the work that you did the day before.
the thought of someone thinking of getting that boat ready for this summer sailing season, well that just make me remember back a few years when I had those thoughts and then I have to laugh.
Sometimes we have moments of lucidity when we think this clearly, then we look at the boat ))
Minnesail likes this.
Pasadena is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 32 Old 05-11-2019
Senior Member
 
fallard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Mystic
Posts: 2,304
Thanks: 19
Thanked 80 Times in 79 Posts
Rep Power: 11
 
Re: Fiberglass checks

On second thought, maybe your boat really was sandblasted down to bare Fiberglas. That would be cruel and unusual punishment. Whatever...I originally thought we were looking at residual bottom paint over gelcoat.

If you really are down to bare fiberglas, and there is no evidence of osmotic blistering, the worst of the bottom job is over and you really can finish the job yourself with a lot of elbow grease and a lot of expensive epoxy and bottom paint. I did this job myself 30 years ago.

Starting with clean, bare Fiberglas, you would seal it with clear epoxy ( I used 2 coats of Interlux 1000). Then you would use an epoxy fairing compound ( I used an Interlux 2 part epoxy fairing compound). Then you would build up the lost gelcoat thickness with many layers of barrier coat (I used Interlux 2000), followed by 3 coats of ablative antifouling. I followed the excellent Interlux directions on recoat times and avoided sanding between coats—except for the fairing coat. There are other brands of materials you could use—Pettit, for example.
fallard is online now  
post #23 of 32 Old 05-11-2019 Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 85
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 1
 
Re: Fiberglass checks

Quote:
Originally Posted by fallard View Post
On second thought, maybe your boat really was sandblasted down to bare Fiberglas. That would be cruel and unusual punishment. Whatever...I originally thought we were looking at residual bottom paint over gelcoat.

If you really are down to bare fiberglas, and there is no evidence of osmotic blistering, the worst of the bottom job is over and you really can finish the job yourself with a lot of elbow grease and a lot of expensive epoxy and bottom paint. I did this job myself 30 years ago.

Starting with clean, bare Fiberglas, you would seal it with clear epoxy ( I used 2 coats of Interlux 1000). Then you would use an epoxy fairing compound ( I used an Interlux 2 part epoxy fairing compound). Then you would build up the lost gelcoat thickness with many layers of barrier coat (I used Interlux 2000), followed by 3 coats of ablative antifouling. I followed the excellent Interlux directions on recoat times and avoided sanding between coats—except for the fairing coat. There are other brands of materials you could use—Pettit, for example.
That is roughly what we have in mind, five coats of Interlux 2000 to prime + three layers of antifouling.

I first want to smooth the surface as much as i can, is a bit bumpy to the touch in some areas. Do you think that I need to sand until all the staining is gone or some can be normal?

Is the epoxy fairing compound used to smooth the surface followed by sanding?
Pasadena is offline  
 
post #24 of 32 Old 05-11-2019
Senior Member
 
overbored's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Dana Point, Ca
Posts: 2,695
Thanks: 2
Thanked 202 Times in 199 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Re: Fiberglass checks

I just finished using Pettit protect epoxy high build primer on my rudders and I like it much better then the 2000 it goes on smother is thicker and then sands much better. only requires two coats. i then spray coated the primer with Pettit Black Widow. wet sands and polishes very well only went to 600 sand paper. does take about 2 days before it gets real hard
Pasadena likes this.

"FULL TILT II" 2011 BENETEAU FIRST 30
"GOLD RUSH" PRINDLE 16
overbored is online now  
post #25 of 32 Old 05-11-2019
Senior Member
 
fallard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Mystic
Posts: 2,304
Thanks: 19
Thanked 80 Times in 79 Posts
Rep Power: 11
 
Re: Fiberglass checks

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pasadena View Post
That is roughly what we have in mind, five coats of Interlux 2000 to prime + three layers of antifouling.

I first want to smooth the surface as much as i can, is a bit bumpy to the touch in some areas. Do you think that I need to sand until all the staining is gone or some can be normal?

Is the epoxy fairing compound used to smooth the surface followed by sanding?
When I took my then-current sailboat down to bare Fiberglas 30 years ago, I used sandpaper, not sandblasting, so I had a reasonably fair surface—albeit rough—as I used 40 grit paper to remove the gelcoat. After that the coarsest paper I used was 80 grit.

I don’t know what your staining is, but I would wash the fiberglas and then wipe it with minerals spirits in an attempt to produce a relative clean surface. When you apply a clear epoxy sealer, you need to beware of an amine blush that can result and needs to be washed off.

After sealing and fairing, I would be tempted to use a higher build product, as was suggested in a previous post, as you are not only producing a barrier, but also building up to replace the gelcoat, which was probably 20 mils or so, but could have been more. 5 coats of 2000 may not be enough.

You ought to be able to to do this yourself, but you can pay to have it done. Doing it yourself, however, will probably save you a few thousand dollars. Your choice!
Pasadena likes this.
fallard is online now  
post #26 of 32 Old 05-11-2019 Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 85
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 1
 
Re: Fiberglass checks

Quote:
Originally Posted by fallard View Post
When I took my then-current sailboat down to bare Fiberglas 30 years ago, I used sandpaper, not sandblasting, so I had a reasonably fair surface—albeit rough—as I used 40 grit paper to remove the gelcoat. After that the coarsest paper I used was 80 grit.

I don’t know what your staining is, but I would wash the fiberglas and then wipe it with minerals spirits in an attempt to produce a relative clean surface. When you apply a clear epoxy sealer, you need to beware of an amine blush that can result and needs to be washed off.

After sealing and fairing, I would be tempted to use a higher build product, as was suggested in a previous post, as you are not only producing a barrier, but also building up to replace the gelcoat, which was probably 20 mils or so, but could have been more. 5 coats of 2000 may not be enough.

You ought to be able to to do this yourself, but you can pay to have it done. Doing it yourself, however, will probably save you a few thousand dollars. Your choice!
Sounds good, Thank you. Is great to have all this information coming from experience. I want to do it myself, is quite exciting but worrying at the same time. It will help me to know the boat and get hands on experience.

Learning a lot already. Thanks
Pasadena is offline  
post #27 of 32 Old 05-12-2019
1968 Columbia 50
 
SV Siren's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Allegan, Michigan
Posts: 389
Thanks: 1
Thanked 30 Times in 30 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Re: Fiberglass checks

I am doing this very thing on mine right now. I had it soda blasted, and it revealed that it had been previously planed to bare glass, with some previous blistering, but nothing active anymore, as there were no yucky voids filled with liquid that popped. I had very shallow pock marks (15 mils)in the glass, but nothing resembling craters, so it wasn't not bad.

I took my trusty 6" RO sander with hook-it 60 grit paper with dust collection over the entire hull to smooth is out, and then used West Systems epoxy thickened with 407, as that is what they recommend. They also recommend wetting out the spots that need fairing with un-thickened epoxy first, then wiping off the excess epoxy with a paper towel before applying the thickened epoxy. I then took my large palm sander(1/3 sheet, I call it my redneck longboard) and went over the entire hull to sand it fair, as there was some wavy-ness to the bottom as well, and this got it as fair as I want it, which is pretty darn fair. Clean the hull to remove any amine blush, and do the vender suggested wipe down prep before applying your barrier coat. For me I will be applying Interlux 2000e in 6 coats, all done in one day, about 1.5 to 2 hours apart. The next day I will be going over the entire hull to sand fair if it isn't smooth enough for my taste, cleaning the surface and wiping down, then applying one last coat of 2000e, and then hot coating the first application of bottom paint, which for me will be VC-17 as I am a sweetwater(fresh) sailor, and everybody uses VC in my area. Additional bottom paint coatings after that as well.

If I ever go nuts, I might burnish that to 600 grit for a really smooth finish, but this would be overkill as I am not going to be doing any organized racing, but I do have standing offers for impromptu racing between friends..as any two boats on the water in close proximity on the same tack are racing to some degree whether they know it or not...


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
S/V Siren 1968 Columbia 50
SV Siren is offline  
post #28 of 32 Old 05-12-2019 Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 85
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 1
 
Re: Fiberglass checks

Hi Guys, Today we brought an experienced friend to survey the boat with us.
---------------------------------------
THE END ))
Pasadena is offline  
post #29 of 32 Old 05-14-2019
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Mostly Florida
Posts: 17
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 0
 
Re: Fiberglass checks

This is my experience, not suggesting good or bad or that I'm some kind of expert or anything, just what I experienced....

I had my gelcoat peeled (with a machine peeler that looked like some kind of modified electric planer) in 2014 and proceeded to do the repair myself. I sanded the hull fair, washed it, let it dry for a couple weeks. I then rubbed it down with an acetone dampened cloth and then applied 3 west system coats, 4 alternating color coatings of Interlux interprotect, then 2 coats of Trinidad black hard bottom paint, hot coating all coats. Due to the drying times I had to get all the way to the first coat of Trinidad in order to quit for the night since Trinidad has a longer recoat time that the epoxies and I could come back in the morning and continue.

In 2018 I hauled the boat again to repaint the bottom. Only in one small area (about 1 foot square) were there "Blisters". It turned out that they were actually bubbles in the Trinidad paint where I must have waited a little too long on the hot coat before applying to the barrier coat. The epoxy coat was fine under the bubbles. I sanded and repainted. We'll see how it is in another 3 or 4 years. I also want to say that after my hull was peeled before the initial repair I noticed many little voids (holes the size of a pencil lead or so) like in one of those pictures in that first link. I said to [email protected] with it because I wasn't going to fill a million little voids and just epoxied over it. Once I started coating with the barrier coat I couldn't see them anymore and it doesn't appear to have been a problem.

Another boat I bought years ago I surveyed myself while in the water. The owner said she had hull blisters so I dove down and sure enough blisters everywhere. She was a sweet Cape Dory so bought her anyway expecting to do a peel and paint. After I hauled her out I realized she already had a barrier coat and the anti-foul was having trouble sticking to the epoxy and bubbling up which appeared to be blistering but wasn't (or maybe was but just the paint bubbling)

So my takeaway is in that article we never really got to see what the hull looked like before they removed the "newly applied repair" I wonder if the blisters were actually just paint blisters or inner layer epoxy blisters rather than fiberglass to epoxy blisters? With the hotcoat drying times (and having to wait for the dew to dry before starting in the morning) it takes more than a day to apply 3 epoxy, 4 barrier, and 3 antifoul coats. So unless the boat yard crew was working in shifts or overtime (never have seen that in a boat yard) at some point the "Hotcoating" wasn't a hot coat, but an unsanded recoat. This could be where the new "blisters" formed.

Good luck.

-Dave
CaptDave is offline  
post #30 of 32 Old 05-14-2019
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 20,317
Thanks: 82
Thanked 577 Times in 553 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
Re: Fiberglass checks

I take it the OP passed on buy this one? Wasn't sure.

On the topic of re-coating, I've read a few that peeled their gelcoat and then applied epoxy to the underlying glass. I've only known a couple to have this done (paid to have it done) and both had a layer of vinylester applied, before doing epoxy barrier and antifouling.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Jeanneau 54DS

In the harsh marine environment, something is always in need of repair. Margaritas fix everything.
Minnewaska is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Automated Marine VHF Radio Checks wwilson Electronics 11 07-12-2015 12:20 PM
Aug 3rd can't promise SS checks will go out" More terror tactics against the mature? deniseO30 Politics, Current Affairs, Guns & HOT Topics 27 07-18-2011 12:37 PM
Sailing Checks? sealover General Discussion (sailing related) 6 02-20-2011 08:27 AM
ID Checks for everybody MIKEMCKEE Politics, Current Affairs, Guns & HOT Topics 4 07-06-2010 08:24 AM
After Sail Checks/PM PalmettoSailor Gear & Maintenance 20 06-05-2006 09:17 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome