I have had it with Outboards, Time to go Electric - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 62 Old 08-14-2019
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Re: I have had it with Outboards, Time to go Electric

I think you need to understand that solar only returns full charging power for a few hours a day, not all day long. A 120-watt solar panel may only give you the full 10 amps a couple of hours a day.
Needless to say, on less than full sunny days, you'll get a whole lot less.
My point is that relying on solar for your power needs is iffy at best and a good shore power fed battery charger would be a good investment as a back-up. A windgen is even less reliable, averaging about 1/3 amp per hour, even here in the tropics where a fairly reliable wind is common.
I'd be more inclined to bite the bullet and buy a Yamaha and have a reliable motor when you need it and should run trouble-free for a good many years, if well maintained.
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post #12 of 62 Old 08-14-2019
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Re: I have had it with Outboards, Time to go Electric

Might be a job for a yuloh? -
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post #13 of 62 Old 08-14-2019
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We had a 3.5 hp Tohatsu that we bought new. Worked ok for 1/2 season and then was a piece of crap. We sold it and bought a Honda 2.3 and this time we used nothing but ethanol free gasoline, even ponying up for Tru Fuel when we were based in Connecticut.

It’s noisy but it starts in the first pull or two every time and hasn’t given us a bit of trouble in 3 years. Now let me go look for the nearest piece of wood to knock on.
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post #14 of 62 Old 08-14-2019
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Re: I have had it with Outboards, Time to go Electric

I believe that I see the problem here;

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcb View Post
My outboard has kicked the bucket again. 3 year old engine. Bought new, shop maintained, 4 stroke.
I am using a 2005 Tohatsu 3.5 2-stroke, rebadged as a Mercury 3.3, that I bought used in 2011. I have had to lube the shifter, clean the carburetor, change the lower unit oil, replace the shear pin after I hit a rock (twice), replace some gaskets and replace the sparkplug in my 9 years of ownership. I do ALL the maintenance myself! I am considering buying another as a spare (should cost ~$300). I love that this thing weighs <30lbs and starts on the second pull. I keep a spice jar under the cowl that contains; a sparkplug wrench, a sparkplug and a spare shear pin, some emory cloth and a zip-tie. That's my emergency tool kit.

In the early '80s I used to work at a hardware store that sold 2-stroke (Lawn-Boy and Fly-Mow) lawnmowers. When people would drop their mowers off in the late fall or early spring for a tune up, the owner of the business would spray carburetor cleaner on the mower, and wash it with a hose. He would then charge them for a full tune up. My mooring neighbor has paid somone to fix a carburetor leak twice. Both times he has instructed the shop to not tune it, but just fix the leak. Both times the motor has been returned a little cleaner, and with a $200+/- bill, and it is still leaking. This time he has decided to fix it himself.
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post #15 of 62 Old 08-14-2019
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Re: I have had it with Outboards, Time to go Electric

I haven’t tested the limits of my setup, but here are my calculations:

Two group 31 batteries wired in series gives me 105 amp hours at 24 volts = 2,520 watt hours

Don’t want to run the batteries below 50% so useful power = 1,260 watt hours

Motor draws 25 amps at half throttle = 600 watts

3 knots at half throttle so range = 6 nm
(or 12 nm in an emergency if I
were willing to murder the batteries)



50 watt solar panel with MPPT controller on an OK day = 200 watt hours

Ranger under solar power = 1 nm / day



Your boat with passengers will weigh about half what my boat weighs. Does that mean you’d get twice the range? I have no idea. But let’s say it does, let’s say your smaller boat can make 3 knots on a 55 lb thrust motor drawing 25 amps at 12 volts.

That would give you a range under battery of 12 nm. If you went up to 135 watts of solar, you’d get a daily range of 5.4 nm from solar charging.

It seems like 5 nm a day with 12 in reserve would probably be enough for your kind of trips, where you’re almost always under sail.



Although this would be 120 lbs of battery and 10 square feet of solar panels on an 800 lb boat, so.....
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post #16 of 62 Old 08-14-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: I have had it with Outboards, Time to go Electric

Quote:
Originally Posted by cthoops View Post
We had a 3.5 hp Tohatsu that we bought new. Worked ok for 1/2 season and then was a piece of crap. We sold it and bought a Honda 2.3 and this time we used nothing but ethanol free gasoline, even ponying up for Tru Fuel when we were based in Connecticut.

It’s noisy but it starts in the first pull or two every time and hasn’t given us a bit of trouble in 3 years. Now let me go look for the nearest piece of wood to knock on.
The engine in question is a 2016 Honda 2.3.
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post #17 of 62 Old 08-14-2019
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Re: I have had it with Outboards, Time to go Electric

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
I think you need to understand that solar only returns full charging power for a few hours a day, not all day long. A 120-watt solar panel may only give you the full 10 amps a couple of hours a day.
Needless to say, on less than full sunny days, you'll get a whole lot less.
Doesn't that 10 amp an hour also assume the optimum angle to the sun from the solar panel? While sailing or if shaded by a sail there will be much less amps stored per day.

My solar has only been setup a few days, I am still learning it's potential. I have a 50watt panel that is processed by a hight end MPPT solar charger available on a stand outside my truck that I rotate and re-angle to get the most sun possible and have only gotten 160watt hours on the best day.

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post #18 of 62 Old 08-14-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: I have had it with Outboards, Time to go Electric

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Originally Posted by Dfok View Post
Cool vid. I am not sure about a Yuloh on my rounded stern. But I have seriously considered oars. I only have a 6 1/4 inch beam. So the oars would be long, but I don't think they would be unmanageable.
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post #19 of 62 Old 08-14-2019
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Re: I have had it with Outboards, Time to go Electric

Quote:
Originally Posted by jephotog View Post
Doesn't that 10 amp an hour also assume the optimum angle to the sun from the solar panel? While sailing or if shaded by a sail there will be much less amps stored per day.

My solar has only been setup a few days, I am still learning it's potential. I have a 50watt panel that is processed by a hight end MPPT solar charger available on a stand outside my truck that I rotate and re-angle to get the most sun possible and have only gotten 160watt hours on the best day.
Really, only 160?

I also have a 50 watt panel with a Genasun MPPT controller, and I figure that I get around 200 watt hours a day.

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post #20 of 62 Old 08-14-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: I have had it with Outboards, Time to go Electric

I should add, I have tested my boat with the 80 ah battery and trolling motor. That is how the boat came and how the previous owner used it. I think his useage was similar to mine, but shorter trips.

It seems to me the current battery gives me about 2 miles of motoring which I figure should be good for maybe 8 dockings, so I call that 4 days.

A 12 mile range as Minn described would be pretty awesome. That might give me 3 weeks use without any charging capacity what so ever.

I am thinking half that would match my useage pretty well. I figure if I could get the equivalent of 1 mile a day charging, that should work.

There are days where we wouldnt use the battery at all. Todays a perfect example. We are stopped on an island just swimming for the day. The boat isn't going any where.

One of the power boaters on the island just came by and let me know he would be running his generator for an hour if we needed to charge anything. So that sort of thing happens too.

I guess it would make sense to bring a plug in charger too.

My boat will paddle at close to a knot with a SUP paddle. But that really kind of sucks and I would rather sail into dock than paddle if there is any wind at all. But motoring into dock beats either option by a mile.
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