Bow damage - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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Re: Bow damage

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Originally Posted by WrkrBee View Post
Post a picture of the stern, also.
Here you go!
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Re: Bow damage

I think you should check for obvious damage as suggested and then proceed with your choice #2. This is a pretty basic boat that will not be crossing oceans. Anything that looks decent will be fine for a rub rail, assuming that you have learned how to stop the boat. You can fix this in a couple of days or a couple of months; how much effort and expense is the boat worth to you?
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Re: Bow damage

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Originally Posted by rocksss View Post
Here you go!
I would try to put a piece of wood athwartship on the back of the rub railing and see if I could hammer it back forward. Be careful.

The material underneath the piping is deceiving, it doesn't look like fiberglass on my monitor. Although, I'd have expected it would have rotted by now, if it wasn't, so wood doesn't make sense either. Get a good look around.


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Re: Bow damage

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Originally Posted by hpeer View Post
No diagram

https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/rock-20

200 made

There was also a rock 24, the photo appears to be the 24. Sailboat data says they were probably based on the same hull.

Does to us look like your boat??
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Originally Posted by hpeer View Post
I guess is that the cosmetic damage could be fixed pretty easily. PROVIDED you didnít do other more serious damage as noted above. Checking the chain plates, rigging, etc. is a great idea.

As to the rub rail is made commercially. You need to get the right cross section. Google.

If you are super cheap you MAY be able to get by with a bit of black water pipe, sliced down the middle.
Yes, that's the model. If there is no serious damage, do you think my approach could work? First grind it down with an angle grinder, then recreate it with fiberglass. A new rub rail doesn't seem to be very expensive, but I'm a bit concerned that it's difficult to install.

Perhaps a black water pipe can work, but I'm not sure how make it look ok. I need to connect the pipe with the old rub rail somehow.

Thanks for all your help!
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Re: Bow damage

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Originally Posted by paulinnanaimo View Post
I think you should check for obvious damage as suggested and then proceed with your choice #2. This is a pretty basic boat that will not be crossing oceans. Anything that looks decent will be fine for a rub rail, assuming that you have learned how to stop the boat. You can fix this in a couple of days or a couple of months; how much effort and expense is the boat worth to you?
Thanks. I was actually thinking of it like steps. First grind the old damaged part down with an angle grinder, then try to recreate everything with fiberglass. Do you think that's a good way to go about it?

The boat itself isn't worth much, I doubt I would get even $1000 for it. So I don't think it's worth paying a professional do it, but I don't mind buying some material and spending some time. I try to think of it more as a learning opportunity, it's probably cheaper to make all rookie mistakes with this boat than if I would do them with a new more expensive boat.
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Re: Bow damage

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Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
I would try to put a piece of wood athwartship on the back of the rub railing and see if I could hammer it back forward. Be careful.

The material underneath the piping is deceiving, it doesn't look like fiberglass on my monitor. Although, I'd have expected it would have rotted by now, if it wasn't, so wood doesn't make sense either. Get a good look around.
Thanks! Ill try to get a good look and perhaps take some better pictures in the next couple of days.
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Re: Bow damage

I think the rub rail is covering the flanged deck/hull connection, as you said. I believe your repair can just be grinding down the cracked/crazed surface maybe 3/16" or so, and then laminating back up with layers of cloth and resin to the approximate original shape. You'll have to 'dummy' up the projecting flange profile as well, to give the rub rail something to snap over. Good practice, as you say.

I would try 'pulling' the rubrail forward, and back into place. You'll need to clamp something on the bow end, and use a come-a-long or some kind of tackle to pull on it at the correct angle. Do it on a warm day, and have a heat gun handy.

Good Luck!

Remember to Reef Early!
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Re: Bow damage

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Originally Posted by rocksss View Post
I don't really know how to attach a "beater block". The rub rail is basically a pipe made of hard plastic, it's hard to get a good grip. I saw on videos people who used hot air guns when installing new rub rails, do you think that could do the trick?
A beater block is a construction phrase. If you are using a hammer or sledgehammer to move something. You don't beat on it directly, you place a piece of lumber, in between it. You hold a 2x4 or whatever construction lumber is where you are, assuming Europe up against the rub rail and hit the piece of wood instead of hitting the rub rail directly.

You might also be able to put a piece of plywood on either side of the rail and clamp into place on the rub rail. Hold a beater block against the clamps or plywood to try to hit it back into place. You might have to try different ways of clamping to get it to work as the hammer will often knock off a less than perfect clamping operation or even a perfect one.

First, grind and fix the fiberglass crack then try to move the rub rail back into place. No need to replace the rub rail if you can not get it back into place. It is important to get it back into place if you plan to continue using the dock to stop your forward momentum.

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Re: Bow damage

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Originally Posted by rocksss View Post
But I'm not sure if I should try to recreate the part that the rub rail is supposed to be attached to. Perhaps someone with more experience know if its doable?
Any shape can be recreated with resin and fiberglass. Use CAD (Cardboard Aided Design) and duct tape to get the shape you want. Make it a little larger, so it can be shaped to finished dimensions. You may have to build it up in layers. Use a release agent or plastic wrap to keep the resin from adhering to the mold.
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Re: Bow damage

Hmmm. I think I disagree with most of the posts here. It looks to me like the force was enough to destroy the rub rail, destroy the hull to deck joint, and press on the structure behind that enough to cause spider cracks. I would think it would be difficult to recreate the hull to deck joint sufficient to be structural. I'm guessing it may be better to completely glass over the joint at the bow. I don't know how it would look cosmetically, but most boats do not have the rub rail go around the bow. Just make it strong.

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