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Bow damage

A while back I smashed right in the dock and damaged the bow on my sailing boat. The fiberglass is damaged, and the rub rail (?) doesn't cover the bow anymore. The rub rail has been pushed back, so it sticks out in the stern. I attached two pictures so you can see what it looks like.

My idea is to:
  1. Use an angle grinder to get down to "healthy" fiberglass.
  2. Try to recreate the bows shape with new fiberglass.

But I'm not sure if I should try to recreate the part that the rub rail is supposed to be attached to. Perhaps someone with more experience know if its doable?

I'm also not sure what to do about the rub rail. According to my online research it seems to be a lot of work to replace the whole thing. On the other hand I'm not really sure what the alternative is.

The boat is an old plastic boat from the 70s, so I don't wanna spend a lot of money on it. But I still try to see it as a nice learning opportunity.
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Re: Bow damage

Rock,

Iím pretty sure I wonít be much help but it might be useful to tell us what kind of boat it is. May help understanding the problem and solution.

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Re: Bow damage

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Rock,

Iím pretty sure I wonít be much help but it might be useful to tell us what kind of boat it is. May help understanding the problem and solution.
The model is called Rock 20. It was produced in Finland during the 60s and 70s. Is there any special info that would be helpful?
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Re: Bow damage

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The model is called Rock 20. It was produced in Finland during the 60s and 70s. Is there any special info that would be helpful?
It would help if you had a more common boat, for example Catalinas are still being made and are supported by the actual company and secondary companies making parts for it. Your boat being obscure it is less likely a lot of aftermarket support exists. You might have more luck contact finish sailors or repair facilities.

It is likely since a good solid bump caused the rub rail to shift back, maybe backing into the slip too fast may shove it back into place.. Or try some other way to shove the rub rail forward. If you can clamp or screw a wooden "beater block" to the rub rail and try sledge hammering the rub rail into place. The beater block is put into place so you can spread the impact over a larger area so as not to damage the object you are trying to move.

Jordan
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Oceanside CA
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Re: Bow damage

Scale is hard to tell in the pic, it's probably smaller than it looks. The rub rail looks like a piece of tubing over a wooden strut. If so, one would think that could be moved forward again somehow. It's hard to imagine how you were going so fast to hit the dock hard enough to do that. It appears as if the entire nose needed to compress, but I don't think fiberglass would just pop back out.

You need to examine this from the inside too. If the cracks go through the boat, or dislodged anything inside, an exterior aesthetic repair isn't really good enough. Damage may not be confined to the impact area either, I'd check all around. When the boat abruptly stopped, the mast would have wanted to keep going and put a shock load on rigging and chain plates. I'd check everything.


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Re: Bow damage

Post a picture of the stern, also.
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Re: Bow damage

No diagram

https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/rock-20

200 made

There was also a rock 24, the photo appears to be the 24. Sailboat data says they were probably based on the same hull.

Does to us look like your boat??
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Re: Bow damage

I guess is that the cosmetic damage could be fixed pretty easily. PROVIDED you didnít do other more serious damage as noted above. Checking the chain plates, rigging, etc. is a great idea.

As to the rub rail is made commercially. You need to get the right cross section. Google.

If you are super cheap you MAY be able to get by with a bit of black water pipe, sliced down the middle.

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Re: Bow damage

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Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Scale is hard to tell in the pic, it's probably smaller than it looks. The rub rail looks like a piece of tubing over a wooden strut. If so, one would think that could be moved forward again somehow. It's hard to imagine how you were going so fast to hit the dock hard enough to do that. It appears as if the entire nose needed to compress, but I don't think fiberglass would just pop back out.

You need to examine this from the inside too. If the cracks go through the boat, or dislodged anything inside, an exterior aesthetic repair isn't really good enough. Damage may not be confined to the impact area either, I'd check all around. When the boat abruptly stopped, the mast would have wanted to keep going and put a shock load on rigging and chain plates. I'd check everything.
I'll take some pictures with something used for scale when I return to the boat next time. For now I attached new images with my best guess. It's about a 1 decimeter/2 inch damage on the front (depending on how you count) and the rub rail has moves back around 2 decimeter/4 inches.

What you call the wooden strut I think actually is the same material as the rest of the boat. The way I thought it was made was that they had a bottom mould and a top mould and then they screwed these together and covered the screws with a rub railing. I was hoping I could grind the damaged parts down with an angle grinder and then recreate all of this with fiberglass, and then cover it with either the old rub railing or perhaps just add a small piece of new rub railing at the bow. Does this seem feasible?

I've looked on the inside but you cant see anything. Perhaps I should try poking it with something to see if its soft? I will also check around the mast and other areas to make sure there are no cracks or anything.

Thanks for all your help!
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Re: Bow damage

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Originally Posted by jephotog View Post
It would help if you had a more common boat, for example Catalinas are still being made and are supported by the actual company and secondary companies making parts for it. Your boat being obscure it is less likely a lot of aftermarket support exists. You might have more luck contact finish sailors or repair facilities.

It is likely since a good solid bump caused the rub rail to shift back, maybe backing into the slip too fast may shove it back into place.. Or try some other way to shove the rub rail forward. If you can clamp or screw a wooden "beater block" to the rub rail and try sledge hammering the rub rail into place. The beater block is put into place so you can spread the impact over a larger area so as not to damage the object you are trying to move.
It certainly seems nice to have a more common model. Perhaps when I upgrade from this one.

I don't really know how to attach a "beater block". The rub rail is basically a pipe made of hard plastic, it's hard to get a good grip. I saw on videos people who used hot air guns when installing new rub rails, do you think that could do the trick?
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