teak decks... how much trouble are they? - SailNet Community
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-14-2010 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 525
Thanks: 2
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 10
 
teak decks... how much trouble are they?

So, I just finished reading 20+ threads here on sailnet about teak deck maintenance, tearing them out, etc. None of them seems to be quite applicable to my situation, however. I've fallen in love with the Cheoy Lee Pedrick 41 design. This boat has teak decks screwed into the fiberglass deck, which is cored (what it is cored with is apparently up for debate... some websites claim balsa, others say it's whatever scraps were handy at the time the boat was made, including teak). The particular one I'm looking at seems to be in really good condition in every way except the teak deck. The selling broker says about half the bungs have popped out, and there is one spongy spot on the deck. Obviously something will have to be done about that, but what? If I were to buy it, am I in for a total deck replacement? One of the other boats of this design that I looked at had its teak removed and nice nonstick paint applied, but that boat was in otherwise poor condition.

I don't have the time, skills or tools to do much of the work myself. What would you do here, and how much would it cost if it was done professionally? I'm thinking the three possibilities are 1) fix the existing deck, 2) tear it up, fix it, replace with nonskid, 3) tear it up, fix it, replace with new teak (or that fake teak stuff). Can you ballpark some prices for these? Should I run away from this boat (and thus probably my dream of the Cheoy Lee Pedrick 41)?

I like the looks of teak, but I don't really understand what it takes to maintain it... a lot of threads say "just wash it" and then go on to say you have to caulk it and other things, so it isnt "just" washing it. If I do decide to fix the deck and/or replace with new teak, what kind of time and money commitment is maintaining a teak deck?

Thanks for any guidance you can provide.
rmeador is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-14-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: annapolis,md
Posts: 36
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
plenty!

Have done many repairs to teak decks over the years,including an 80's vintage Pedrick 41. All the older Taiwanese boat decks I've torn into have been cored with plywood squares about 4'' by 4''. Set in polyester resin,then poked into by hundreds [thousands?] of screws, and covered with planks set in what looks like roofing tar-they dont have a chance in hell of lasting generations.
Only good news is that it would have to be a rare case to be bad enough to compromise safe use for coastal cruising. Smart to insist on a sale price that factors in your cost[or portion anyway] to recore and reglass decks. Could be 15,000-25,000!
georgefmys is offline  
Old 05-14-2010
Senior Member
 
mitiempo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Victoria B.C. Canada
Posts: 7,854
Thanks: 0
Thanked 113 Times in 104 Posts
Rep Power: 13
   
Teak decks look great, are good nonskid even when wet, and are easy to care for - for the first owner or two. Then look out.
The only way to repair properly is to rip the teak up. And then the top skin. And you never know what you might find. If you're really lucky there may only be a few rotton spots. But more likely, especially the way Far East boats were usually cored, there will be a lot of wet, rotton plywood or whatever. Then you recore the deck with epoxy and a suitable core (not plywood) and glass over and fair it. A lot of work. Not super expensive if you do it yourself but a lot of work. And if you plan on teak again the price will be high for the amount needed. And more skill is required to lay the teak on top. And drill all those holes that will one day cause more problems. The sensible thing to do is add non skid paint (maybe Kiwi Grip) and leave it at that. If done properly with all hardware properly potted with epoxy as it should have been done originally (but wasn't) it should last 20 years. As posted above even without the teak overlay, if the yard does this it's very expensive.
Or just find another boat.

Brian
Living aboard in Victoria Harbour
mitiempo is offline  
 
Old 05-15-2010
Senior Member
 
kd3pc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Callao, VA
Posts: 1,529
Thanks: 0
Thanked 35 Times in 34 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
rmeador,

Pedrick 41 is a lot of teak decks...your choices are remove and replace, remove and coat it, live with it, coat (with truck bed liner) it...

Remove and replace will be $$$ likely $18-22K in your neck of the woods, if you can find someone willing and able. You could replace it with synthetic and save a few bucks. This may last another 12-15 years if done correctly. It will need maintenance, the amount depends on how well it was installed in the first place.

Second choice, remove the deck, patch the holes and the deck soft spots, then fair and non-skid..will likely cost a quarter to a third of redoing the teak. But not look as good? Will likely be cooler to the feet, but you may feel more heat below decks as you are removing a good thickness of material.

Living with it, can be as simple as removing and replacing loose bungs and screws, a recaulk, cutting down the caulk and oiling the deck. However you may discover that very few screws are there, bungs are tough to reglue and caulking is an art....a messy one at that. If you are not doing the work it is costly as it is very labor intensive. Soft spots another thing..they generally only get worse and spread..again costly and sightly to fix, if you are not going to do a whole section...you will see the patch.

Lastly, you can "spray liner" the entire deck. I have seen this done on a Cheoy Lee, a Marine Trader 36, and a Cabo Rico....your results vary by the amount of prep time, some of the spray is soft to walk on, so it masks even more the soft spots (feels like the whole deck is soft). Limited colors, can put non-skid in it, quick and easy, the Cabo was about $4K, not sure what the other two were. The Marine Trader is on it's 3rd year, with no problems so far. Some roofers are using this now, it goes on gray, sets up in a few hours to the color you chose and voila. A lot of commercial marine uses for it.

All the best.
kd3pc is online now  
Old 05-15-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 1,889
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 15
   
As a teak-deck survivor with a Cheoy Lee built 42 footer, I'd offer the following.

1. The amount of maintenance required with teak decks depends on how they were built and how old they are and where they are and how well they've been maintained and your tolerance for pain.

2. The decks you described on the Pederick will need REPLACING. Not repairing. Not (only) recaulking. I did that dance in the Caribbean for years before deciding to rip them off and replace them with a new layer of fiberglass cloth and 8 coats of Awlgrip + non-skid.

3. Replacing bungs is a thankless and fruitless task. Typically, the fasteners are too near the surface and you'll not get bungs to stick for long, even with epoxy. Re-caulking is also a big job and one which often leads to more pain. Been there, done that.

4. Cheoy-Lee built teak decks of that era with thousands of fasteners into the deck beneath are notorious for leaks. If you have a cored deck, those leaks can create numerous places of rot and spongy decks.

I was lucky. We ripped off the teak decks, ensured that the deck underneath was solid, laid down a layer of new fiberglass matting over the existing fiberglass deck, and applied the 8 coats of Awlgrip. Ten years later they still look good. The job was professionally done and overseen by a master shipwright.

At the same time, I replaced the teak in my cockpit....floor, settees, bridgedeck, etc. This was done correctly, with carefully selected teak and with epoxy...no fasteners. Best thing to do with teak IMHO: leave it natural. Just wash it across the grain from time to time with a gentle soap. Ten years later, the teak in my cockpit still looks like new.

I don't miss the teak decks. The boat is noticeably cooler belowdecks, and I can wash the decks with a hose in one hand and a Mt. Gay and coke in the other :-)

If you're really sold on this Pederick, be prepared to spend upwards of $20-25K to replace the decks and have the job done properly. Otherwise, just walk away the wiser.

IMHO,

Bill

Last edited by btrayfors; 05-15-2010 at 10:07 AM.
btrayfors is offline  
Old 06-11-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
I removed the teak decks from my Cheoy Lee Offshore 40. I wrote an article about the project. If you're interested, I can e-mail you the pdf.
thalassa2444 is offline  
Old 06-11-2010
Courtney the Dancer
 
jrd22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: San Juan Islands., WA, USA
Posts: 3,971
Thanks: 5
Thanked 32 Times in 31 Posts
Rep Power: 20
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by btrayfors View Post
As a teak-deck survivor with a Cheoy Lee built 42 footer, I'd offer the following.

1. The amount of maintenance required with teak decks depends on how they were built and how old they are and where they are and how well they've been maintained and your tolerance for pain.
So true Bill.
We tore off the teak decks on our Taiwan built Brewer and replaced as you did with glass and nonskid. Potted all the holes for the deck hardware with thickened epoxy. Lot's of time, lot's of money, but I never wanted to have to worry about the core getting wet and rotting and then having that huge job to consider. I agree with everyone else, plan on ripping it off or walk away unless the seller will drop the price 20K to pay for the job.

John
SV Laurie Anne

1988 Brewer 40 Pilothouse

jrd22 is offline  
Old 06-11-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 4,192
Thanks: 50
Thanked 38 Times in 37 Posts
Rep Power: 19
     
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrd22 View Post
So true Bill.
We tore off the teak decks on our Taiwan built Brewer and replaced as you did with glass and nonskid. Potted all the holes for the deck hardware with thickened epoxy. Lot's of time, lot's of money, but I never wanted to have to worry about the core getting wet and rotting and then having that huge job to consider. I agree with everyone else, plan on ripping it off or walk away unless the seller will drop the price 20K to pay for the job.
I hated the teak decks on our CT 41'.
After spending a summer reefing out all the seams and redoing the whole thing with poly sulfide that the cat always felt the need to walk through and track everywhere we loved the way it looked. Unfortunately, the seams started opening up the very next year (yes I used the primer).
At that point, I bought a couple gallons of varnish and some oil based white paint. I rolled a thick coat of varnish, sprinkled some walnut shell and coated it a few time more. Then I painted it with a few coats of the white paint.
Best decision I ever made. It dropped the temp inside the boat and for the first time, we were able to walk on deck barefoot. No more leaks either.

I figured that if it were a problem when we sold the boat, a heat gun and scraper could remove the whole mess without much trouble. That never became an issue though.
knothead is offline  
Old 06-11-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 1,130
Thanks: 4
Thanked 56 Times in 55 Posts
Rep Power: 20
 
Red face

I have seen decks done beautifully in both sanded non-skid LPU and also with the non-skid section/pattern done in Treadmaster.
The owner put in a LOT of work to pull up the old teak, fill a thousand old holes, and repair the areas that where the core was rotted with new coring and an frp top. Much epoxy was involved.

Results were very good, and a classic boat was saved. Matter of fact, this is a common repair/upgrade for 70's classic trawlers, too.

Like a many boat projects, you must invest a lot of time, or a lot of money. And then plan on keeping and enjoying that boat at least a decade to amortize your investment by using the boat. (You never will get much of your money back, and none of your time, but you knew that. Right?)


L
olson34 is online now  
 

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Thread Tools



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lifting keel on Seaward 26RK wonder if they give any trouble videorov Gear & Maintenance 7 12-13-2013 01:05 PM
Semco teak sealer for teak decks johnnyboy2 Gear & Maintenance 4 03-07-2011 04:28 AM
why did they ever invent white decks? HoffaLives Gear & Maintenance 31 12-05-2007 03:02 PM
Little Harbor Teak Decks -- Were They Ever Glued On? RAGNAR Gear & Maintenance 1 03-09-2007 12:42 PM
teak decks scottmillington Boat Review and Purchase Forum 4 01-19-2006 03:32 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome