The Benefits of Bottom Feeding - Page 3 - SailNet Community
 115Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 68 Old 04-05-2014 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
bljones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: South Coast Ontario
Posts: 8,476
Thanks: 35
Thanked 94 Times in 83 Posts
Rep Power: 12
   
Re: The Benefits of Bottom Feeding

Quote:
Originally Posted by jameswilson29 View Post
Dear Mr. Jones,

Should I be concerned that I find myself agreeing with you more and more?
if it lasts for more than four hours, consult your physician.

It's 5 o'clock somewhere:


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by bljones; 04-05-2014 at 09:06 AM.
bljones is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 68 Old 04-05-2014 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
bljones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: South Coast Ontario
Posts: 8,476
Thanks: 35
Thanked 94 Times in 83 Posts
Rep Power: 12
   
Re: The Benefits of Bottom Feeding

Quote:
Originally Posted by mad_machine View Post
It is people like me with their 23 to 30 foot boats who are looked down upon as if to say "that is all you could afford?"
Don't ever feel inferior about what you sail.
your boat is not "all you could afford". it is simply all that you need.
Donna_F, JimMcGee, Sn0wman and 6 others like this.

It's 5 o'clock somewhere:


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
bljones is offline  
post #23 of 68 Old 04-05-2014
The most female moderator
 
Donna_F's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 5,845
Thanks: 145
Thanked 300 Times in 271 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Dock
Re: The Benefits of Bottom Feeding

Quote:
Originally Posted by mad_machine View Post
... It is people like me with their 23 to 30 foot boats who are looked down upon as if to say "that is all you could afford?"
That's sad.

I kept my 22 footer in our marina. There are other <30 foot boats in our marina. Everyone regardless of boat size gets along, keeps in touch if you don't show up too many weekends in a row, worries about each other, helps each other. If I was looked down upon, I was oblivious to it. Too many marinas around to pay to be with that type of crowd.
JimMcGee likes this.

Donna


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Catalina 30 TRBS
Rock Hall, MD
KB3ZCB

If you're helping someone and expecting something in return, you're doing business not kindness.
Donna_F is offline  
 
post #24 of 68 Old 04-05-2014
Daniel - Norsea 27
 
Rhapsody-NS27's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Me: VA Boat: Deale, MD
Posts: 1,240
Thanks: 127
Thanked 60 Times in 54 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Re: The Benefits of Bottom Feeding

My boat may not be the bottom of the bottom or cheapest of the cheap but the bottom is more of where I feel comfortable. From what I've seen, the crowds are a heck of a lot more interesting and so are the stories. I love my boat. I enjoy seeing anyone else crawling around their own.

I have a lot to learn, I admit it. That's part of why I love having an older boat. There is always something to learn from all the maintenance. Being over 30 year's old, it's not the fastest, but I didn't get it for racing.

I wouldn't want most of the newer boats. To me they are starting to all look the same.

My boat may not be among the biggest but it gets me to the water. It's a great size to learn on and to grow on as my skills grow.

I love this sailing.
bljones likes this.

Daniel
1981 Nor'sea 27,
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Quote:
“Who is staring at the sea is already sailing a little.”
-Paul Carvel
Rhapsody-NS27 is offline  
post #25 of 68 Old 04-05-2014
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 684
Thanks: 0
Thanked 18 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 11
 
Re: The Benefits of Bottom Feeding

Quote:
Originally Posted by mad_machine View Post
When I was a youngster here at the Jersey Shore.. 30 feet of boat seemed huge and was about as big as most people went. Some had 33, some had 35, but most were around 30.. this was mostly powerboats. Sailboats were usually in the high 20s.

It is people like me with their 23 to 30 foot boats who are looked down upon as if to say "that is all you could afford?"
In general, I agree with BJ's original post, although I have always opted for new. Generally, one has a certain amount of money to allocate to this hobby, so if you go new, it's smaller and has fewer bells and whistles...no, probably none. BJ mentioned why I go new, I like shiney new, even if it is small, and I am a believer that I'll have fewer problems that way. To me, it's a pay me now or pay me later situation. From the first day that I saw a sailboat, I was always wanting to eventually own one of those large 33 footers. I've almost gotten there after many years (74 years old). It's a 32 Catalina. But I agree with the thing about being looked down on. My first boat was a new McGregor Venture 24, and almost everyone beats up that brand, but you know, it did just fine for me, sold it at a profit. Then, came a new Kells 28, another off -brand. It did fine for 22 years. And I remember a comment from a owner of a Cape Dory 36. I don't remember the topic, it was just small talk, when he came across with a comment "boats like yours". Owners of Catalina, Beneteau, and Hunter all get the same treatment from time to time. Doesn't make any difference about size, it can be 23 ft. or 40 ft., new or old. All of these boats work just fine, new or second hand, smaller or larger. But when one gets the "is that all you could afford?" treatment, it tarnishes the dream considerably. And that treatment is not limited to boating, it's everywhere.
All one can do is to try to ignore it and push on.
NCC320 is offline  
post #26 of 68 Old 04-05-2014 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
bljones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: South Coast Ontario
Posts: 8,476
Thanks: 35
Thanked 94 Times in 83 Posts
Rep Power: 12
   
Re: The Benefits of Bottom Feeding

Thanks for chiming in NCC.
And thank you for providing a "why buy new" point of view.

As I said, there is absolutely nothing wrong with buying a new boat at all. This isn't an "Us vs. Them", "I'm right and the rest of you wrong" sort of thing. I simply started exploring why I buy the boats I buy. It's interesting and kinda gratifying to see how many feel the same way.

There is no wrong path to purchasing a boat and getting out sailing. The only wrong path is the one that leads away from getting on the water. Life is too short not to sail, and life is way, way too short to worry about those who look down on what you're sailing. We all share the same sunsets.

It's 5 o'clock somewhere:


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
bljones is offline  
post #27 of 68 Old 04-05-2014
Noah's Bosun
 
Cap-Couillon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Boot Key Harbor, Marathon Fl
Posts: 236
Thanks: 3
Thanked 27 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Re: The Benefits of Bottom Feeding

Quote:
your boat is not "all you could afford". it is simply all that you need
Well said sir....

A little expansion on my earlier "throw-away" post...

I have never owned a "new" boat... New to me, yeah but not "new". Hell, I have only owned one "new" car. A brand new 1973 Datsun pickup which cost me $1900.00 out the door and we sold that when my wife and I moved back to the western Pacific and bought a 27 foot sailboat. Lived on and sailed that sucker until we lost her in Typhoon Pamela in '76.

Swallowed the anchor and moved back to the states. Wife died young, so took two kids (5 and 7 years old) bought a Bill Tripp designed center cockpit 40 and sailed her full time all over the western Pacific and central America till the kids got old enough to mutiny and abandoned ship. (They both live inland... go figure)

After 10 more years or so of single handing, swallowed the anchor again. Boat's to big.. Older I get, harder to single hand her, too big a hole in the water to throw money into.
Mistake...

2 years ashore.. need to knock peoples hats off in the street for no reason. Buddy owns marina, has nice little 25 sound but neglected. Take her off my hands he says. Ok I says what more do I need? Small hole in the water.... Less cost for everything. Some new gear to take advantage of technology. Eg all LED lights means those cheapo golf cart bats work fine for the house bank. Used Suzi kicker (bic outboard) and who wants to steal it. Used bronze turnbuckles to replace the POS stainless barrels. Used Orego stove.
Used Garmin GPS (no chart plotter, run OpenCpn on Navigatrix laptop for passage planning) Used tiller pilot (mostly sheet to tiller steering off shore) Used ground tackle...
Use it up, wear it out, make it do.... Not the prettiest girl at the dance, but she sleeps and sails well. As I don't have to have a full time gig to pay off the national debt, I actually spend my time going new places, and seeing new faces.

You have to be of a certain age to recognize the next reference. One of my favorite signs I ever saw was on the fence of a nice small homestead. It was called "Oleo Acres - The Cheaper Spread"
bigdogandy and bljones like this.

"If the wind will not serve, lay to the oars"


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Cap-Couillon is offline  
post #28 of 68 Old 04-05-2014
Junior Member
 
GreenNonic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: perrysville, Ohio
Posts: 12
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Smile Re: The Benefits of Bottom Feeding

i am brand new to sailing, i have only been on a sail boat once and only for a few hours, that being said i am definitely a bottom feeder . i do the same thing with cars, i do not want a new car, they are built with cheaper parts, and the stuff that's good costs so much to replace i don't want it, 300 bucks for a anti lock brake sensor, i miss when cars were just a battery, carb, transmission,and wheels anyone could fix them, and cheap too, i feel like the more wires, and electronics on a boat there is the more hassle it will be (especially since for some reason the inside of boats are very not water tight, you take on some water and suddenly everything stops working)

having spent the last few months looking at pictures of boats just to see what i seemed to like, i started noticing i would just skip over newer boats, not because of the price, but because i just dislike how they look. i really like older boat style , you can at least tell them apart anyways. when i go to buy a boat (sometime in the next few months) it will be an older boat with character and some neat stories hopefully . it will only be 5 or 6 thousand dollars ..because i like it down here, I've always like used items even when i had the money to buy nw, i would pick a used car, or bike or tool, i am not really sure why, it wasn't the money. i guess i was just born a bottom feeder
bljones likes this.
GreenNonic is offline  
post #29 of 68 Old 04-05-2014
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 5,006
Thanks: 5
Thanked 20 Times in 20 Posts
Rep Power: 16
     
Re: The Benefits of Bottom Feeding

Some people I have talked to who insist on purchasing new, be it cars, or whatever, tend to be technophobes who have a kind of superstition that if they buy new then they can avoid the inevitable problems that boats, cars, and other technological devices eventually have. I've seen this behavior in all walks of life, from people who won't drive an older car for fear it will break down to a story on television about a guitar player for a rock band who kept asking the manufacturer he was working with to send him new guitars because he didn't know how to properly tune the ones they had already sent him. It may be controversial, but I think these are basically lazy people, mentally, who can't be bothered with figuring out the details of complicated systems. I think it's kind of sad because technophobes become so deflated when something eventually goes wrong with their new device, and some go to extremes and even sell out and purchase new again whenever the least thing goes wrong in the hope that this time it will be different. It's very wasteful in a number of ways; obviously it costs a lot of money, but as an outsider it also looks very stressful, sometimes these people seem like they're walking around in a kind of restless dream that they know could end at any moment. I've never understood this extreme reluctance to get past all of the superstition and learn the most basic information about systems, but some people simply won't do it no matter what it costs them.

I would also like to add that I agree with Bljones on this, there's nothing wrong with buying new, my comment isn't about everybody who buys a new boat, and I'm not trying to start an "us vs. them" argument either.
bljones likes this.

What are you pretending not to know ?

Please support my
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by wind_magic; 04-05-2014 at 11:37 AM. Reason: sp
wind_magic is offline  
post #30 of 68 Old 04-05-2014
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 765
Thanks: 0
Thanked 19 Times in 19 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Re: The Benefits of Bottom Feeding

There is a saying that is certainly true: "The bigger the boat the less it is used". It is true because a bigger boat requires more maintenance hence less sailing time. Further, one has to make more money to afford to own it meaning less sailing.
New boats rarely go on extended cruises simple because the owner is busy earning money to pay for them whereas older are already paid for.
New boats can be as big a maintenance headache as an older boat. Just read the warranty stories about new boats, and these are boats people pay full price for. By the time these boats are used, the major headaches are solved.
New boats require more maintenance to keep up their value hence less sailing time whereas an older boat is already depreciated so maintenance for the purpose of "looks" can be allowed to slide.
Frogwatch is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SAILING: Larsen feeding his speed need NewsReader News Feeds 0 10-17-2013 03:10 AM
Feeding my watermaker Edo Kazumichi Gear & Maintenance 0 08-18-2009 08:45 PM
Care and Feeding of the Perkins 4-108 PearsonCommander Gear & Maintenance 12 04-05-2009 09:17 AM
Brightwork, Care & Feeding steps006 Gear & Maintenance 8 02-02-2008 06:35 PM
Feeding the cruising kitty nauticalnut Living Aboard 12 09-15-2007 10:57 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome