How to prepare/refit a boat for Bluewater - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 30 Old 06-14-2015
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Re: How to prepare/refit a boat for Bluewater

Yes, the list is virtually endless. I'm thinking I might have been better finding a boat that had already gone through this and the owners had to scratch their plans at the last minute. Oh well, it is what it is.

I didn't mention that the 30 year old teak deck is also getting replaced during the refit. yippee :-/ Gives me the opportunity to re-bed all my deck hardware and create a dinghy hold-down system on the foredeck better than the current ropes tied to stanchions. :-)

As part of the electrical refit, a new Iso transformer that will automatically convert all voltages to 120v and a cool new charger/inverter. Of course new batteries to go with it. :-)

Already have a hydraulic ram autopilot and was thinking of installing a wind vane, but if I decide to install a DC generator, I think I'll just stick with hydraulic and pack a rebuild kit.
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post #12 of 30 Old 06-14-2015
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Re: How to prepare/refit a boat for Bluewater

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Jon,

It also crossed my mind... A feathering prop. No question about it would be at the very top of my wants list. Testing shows that a prop will create almost as much drag as the entire rest of the hull. It makes a huge difference in how the boat sails, particularly in light air, where reduced drag equates directly into being able to sail instead of motoring.
I have been shopping for a bigger boat and many I have looked at have a feathering prop. One was defective and would not flip into reverse position, so I asked my boat yard owner when he thought of them and he said that he has installed many of them over the years and only one boat, used for racing, noticed a difference.

There also in the issue of reliability -- if you are on a long trip and some part of the mechanism fails then you have a problem to deal with -- better to have a fixed propeller which won't give you any surprises.
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post #13 of 30 Old 06-14-2015
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Re: How to prepare/refit a boat for Bluewater

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I have been shopping for a bigger boat and many I have looked at have a feathering prop. One was defective and would not flip into reverse position, so I asked my boat yard owner when he thought of them and he said that he has installed many of them over the years and only one boat, used for racing, noticed a difference.

There also in the issue of reliability -- if you are on a long trip and some part of the mechanism fails then you have a problem to deal with -- better to have a fixed propeller which won't give you any surprises.
In almost 25 years of using feathering props I have never had an issue with them opening or flipping. I am sure it does happen, but the likelihood of it is pretty remote.

As for it making a difference... A fixed prop adds about as much drag as a five gallon bucket tossed over the side. Assuming you can figure out a way to attach it strongly enough that it doesn't break free it's pretty easy to see how boat speed fares. It is a massive difference.

The .5kn speed difference over the course of a day is 12nm. Given most boats will average about 100nm a day is a pretty major hit. Over the course of a 10 day crossing that's more than a full day. When compounded over ocean crossing distances it is even more pronounced.

It also feeds into a spiral. Higher average passage times equal less food and water that need to be stored. Which means less weight, and faster passage times.

And since a feathering prop means the most when speeds are low, it means that you can continue to sail in much lighter breeze than without.

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post #14 of 30 Old 06-14-2015
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Re: How to prepare/refit a boat for Bluewater

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And now for the opposite opinion...you don't need most of the swell things posted above. Sure, you can buy and maintain and later replace them if you like, but you certainly don't need these things.
Can't agree more.

Chall, here's the thing (for me at least). We bought our current boat in the US, flew there from NZ, had a look a the stuff that was obviously dodgy and fixed it. We took two weeks to not only prep the boat but stock it with food and stuff, up-graded some safety gear. And we left for New Zealand - our trip home was 6800Nm. Most of the stuff on the boat today is either as we bought it or has been added (not replaced) and we're nearly 10 years down the track. I'm starting now to replace halyards, crack test my rig (not replacing anything unless it is singled out as dodgy), looking at a new headsail and so on.

Not all used boats are set to have all their major systems fail just because the owner is changed. That to me is a fallacy that is infinitely over-stated in the forum environment. Whilst I'm not suggesting there are not things that will fail, simply replacing half the moving parts of the boat just on principle? Well, I think that's what keeps half the would-be cruisers at home - it makes the business of voyaging unaffordable for the average sailor.

And then there's the decision - should I buy an old boat and replace every moving part at very considerable expense or should I rather look for a boat that's a whole lot newer that will come at the same overall cost as the purchase and subsequent re-manufacture of the older boat?

Replacing all the sails, the running rigging, the standing rigging, overhauling the engine, what else is there? If I was to buy a used boat and all this stuff was deemed to be due for imminent failure, I would just move on.

It's easy to spend someone else's money on a keyboard. Unless you have a serious pool of cash, refurbishing for the sake of it will keep you poor. And if you do have serious pool of cash, buy something better.

I'll probably live to regret this post.
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post #15 of 30 Old 06-14-2015 Thread Starter
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Re: How to prepare/refit a boat for Bluewater

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Can't agree more.
It's easy to spend someone else's money on a keyboard. Unless you have a serious pool of cash, refurbishing for the sake of it will keep you poor. And if you do have serious pool of cash, buy something better.

I'll probably live to regret this post.
Don't live with regrets . Your in the been there done that category and I really appreciate your honest 2 cents.

What you saying is the reason I started this thread, I can see the refurbishment trap - I want a safe boat with minimal dramas but no I don't want to blow our cruising kitty in one foul swoop and that would be very easy to do.

We might be in a very similar situation to you in that we will most probably be buying a boat offshore and equipping it in short order in a foreign port.

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post #16 of 30 Old 06-15-2015
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Re: How to prepare/refit a boat for Bluewater

I hear you Omatako and agree. But, you know, sometimes stuff happens.

I knew the teak deck needed a little TLC, but I didn't know, 'til the chain plates were cut out that gallons of water was migrating into the hull.

I suspected the chain plates needed replacing based on the survey. One of them fell apart in the riggers hands!

What's the rudder like? I'm pushing 60 with my first boat - now that I know the dangers, do I want to chance a cross wind at the wrong time in a marina full of very expensive yachts without the semi-security of a bow thruster?

So, time for a full refit. At least for my piece of mind. YMMV :-)
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Re: How to prepare/refit a boat for Bluewater

Some will make a mountain out of a molehill on refit items. We had the rudder and shaft out of this islander 44 in about 3 1/2 hours. New shaft fabricated deep up a river for less then a 100 bucks.
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Temptation Steak n Shaft & Rudder 069.jpg   Temptation Steak n Shaft & Rudder 079.jpg   Temptation Steak n Shaft & Rudder 092.jpg   Temptation Steak n Shaft & Rudder 089.jpg  
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Re: How to prepare/refit a boat for Bluewater

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Some will make a mountain out of a molehill on refit items. We had the rudder and shaft out of this islander 44 in about 3 1/2 hours. New shaft fabricated deep up a river for less then a 100 bucks.
I need to go up that river........
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Re: How to prepare/refit a boat for Bluewater

Let's get controversial! How about anchors and the whole ground tackle system? Obviously they get stowed low while offshore but what are some good pointers about the entire ground tackle system for bluewater cruisers? An electrical/manual wildcat and gypsy? Easily transferable rodes and shackles? A foldable anchor such as a Fortress? Any thoughts about these things? If you remove chain from the well and stow it near the bilge, what can you transfer to the anchor well? How about collapsible and reinflatable fenders? How about fender boards that double as racks for jerry jugs? Surely the Pardeys, Hiscocks, Roths and other have written a great deal about all this bluewater preparation-yes?
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post #20 of 30 Old 06-15-2015
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Re: How to prepare/refit a boat for Bluewater

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Originally Posted by chall03 View Post

So what I am interested in hearing about( especially from those who have been there and done that) is what kinds of improvements, checks and preparations are common or at least good sense in preparing any given boat for 'Bluewater'?


.
I note some here has an extensive list of Must Dos to the extent you can only be safe if you buy the boat, then buy a new boat. Leave the old boat on the hard forever then it won't sink. And never sail the new boat... And do the circumnavigation by bus.

I just bought my boat and sailed off into the sunset.


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