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post #41 of 59 Old 10-29-2015
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Re: Sleeping with the heat on...

My last stove built 31 years ago , which I gave a friend, just had the type 400 stainless top and back rust out, after burning only salty beach wood the entire time . The type 316 parts are as good as the day I built it, altho blacker.
I find that even mild steel stoves are not all that much affected by salty wood, as they are too dry for any reaction much of the time.
There are far greater environmental impacts to be caused by urban living ,than any you would cause by burning beach wood.Look at the oil slicks in parking lots. You could go for "Clean' electric heat, while tied to the dock, powered by coal fired generating stations. Just living aboard instead of ashore, reduces your environmental impact drastically, regardless of what kind of heating you can afford.
I read in last Octobers National Geographic, that most western US homes use 250 gallons of water a day, per person. How long does that much water last the average cruiser or liveaboard.The list of differences in environmental impact goes on.
Your stove and chimney should be tight enough to protect the occupants from any such consequences.

At any rate, for living aboard a stock plastic boat in cooler climes, comfortably, you have to add a lot of extra insulation, as almost all stock plastic boats are extremely poorly insulated. If properly insulated, a boat can be the most comfortable, driest home you ever lived in. If not, you are doing something wrong.
Tiny tots are far too tiny to be useful, in any cool climes. You need a firebox which will run for many hours, without refueling.
Sponsering the Exon Valdes's or the strip mining of coal is far less environmentally friendly than burning beach wood.
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Last edited by Brent Swain; 10-29-2015 at 07:31 PM.
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post #42 of 59 Old 10-29-2015
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Re: Sleeping with the heat on...

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Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
How about a 12 volt electric blanket? This example is just a random find. 6.7amps, presumably on high, would be doable, if you have a decent sized house bank and recharging ability. Not sure if it's just a wives tale that the EMF from these things is bad.

Amazon.com: Roadpro 12-Volt 100% Polar Fleece Heated Travel Blanket: Automotive
I was thinking about an electric blanket while motoring in winter, powered by an inverter, which is powered by my alternator. When I get to my destination ,turn my motor off, and no longer have the power, my bunk will be super warm when I jump in it.
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post #43 of 59 Old 10-29-2015
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Re: Sleeping with the heat on...

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Having owned a Fisher Grampa Bear wood stove at home for two decades, I'm now glad it has been replaced with a vent free gas log stove that does a great job of heating my family room and much of the house during the dead of winter.
All th ebest,

Gary
There is no such thing as a vent free gas fireplace. These should instead be called "exhaust to living room fireplaces" but I think the Madison ave crowd found that didn't sell so well....

~fortunat

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post #44 of 59 Old 10-29-2015
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Re: Sleeping with the heat on...

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There is no such thing as a vent free gas fireplace. These should instead be called "exhaust to living room fireplaces" but I think the Madison ave crowd found that didn't sell so well....

~fortunat

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Wanna bet?

https://www.menards.com/main/heating...ces/c-6852.htm

Brent, I like the idea of an electric blanket. They draw very little current and really do a great job of keeping you warm on the coldest nights. When I was young, I had a better way of keeping warm. Now we have a king size bed, so cheek to cheek is as close as it gets.

I just looked up the power consumption of an electric blanket, and a queen sized, dual control blanket draws about 50 watts per side. A single, full size draws about 75 watts maximum, but most people run than at a half power, which would be great for keeping warm on most cold nights. Additionally, they are thermostatically controlled and turn on and off with very little surge. Great idea, Brent. Wish I would have thought of that when I was freezing my buns off heading down the ICW three years ago. One will be going on the boat before next fall.

Gary

Cheers,

Gary

Last edited by travlin-easy; 10-29-2015 at 09:04 PM.
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post #45 of 59 Old 10-29-2015
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Re: Sleeping with the heat on...

I have been using an electric blanket, most of the time in the slip but when I'm out overnight running the engine for 30 minutes with the inverter on gets the bed toasty enough. I also open the engine panel and that in itself keeps the boat above freezing for the night

Long term cruising I have no experience so no comment but I have to say, the feel and look of wood is pretty sexy I say go South otherwise if you can.

Shawn


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Re: Sleeping with the heat on...

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Originally Posted by misfits View Post
Here's a pretty cool stove made up in Canada.
Cubic Mini Wood Stoves - Mini wood stoves

Dickson mentions not to burn saltwater driftwood in their manual because it rots the stove out, that makes sense.
Whoa! Those look great! Tiny, airtight, cheap, wall mountable and affordable!

I'll sleep on it, but I'm probably buying one as soon as I can figure out where to put it.

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post #47 of 59 Old 10-30-2015
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Re: Sleeping with the heat on...

Guys, check post #17. You don't need to invert an electric blanket from your house bank, just buy a 12v blanket. No invertor loss.
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Re: Sleeping with the heat on...

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Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
.... There are far greater environmental impacts to be caused by urban living ,than any you would cause by burning beach wood........
While a loose comparison, it may be true. I believe it anyway.

Nevertheless, the issue that's been raised is that the chlorine molecules in salt water soaked driftwood can create neurotoxins and carcinogens when burned. That's worth giving careful consideration, especially in a small closed environment, like a boat.


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Re: Sleeping with the heat on...

It appears that the 12-volt electric blankets draw 50 to 75-watts, however, they tend to be a bit smaller than the household models that draw the same amount of current at 115-volts. The prices are about the same.

My inverter draws no current unless something is plugged into it. Yes, I have checked it out.

All the best,

Gary
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Re: Sleeping with the heat on...

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Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
...There are far greater environmental impacts to be caused by urban living, than any you would cause by burning beach wood. Look at the oil slicks in parking lots. You could go for "Clean' electric heat, while tied to the dock, powered by coal fired generating stations. Just living aboard instead of ashore, reduces your environmental impact drastically, regardless of what kind of heating you can afford.

...Sponsoring the Exon Valdes's or the strip mining of coal is far less environmentally friendly than burning beach wood.
I agree, I'm amazed that city dwellers are so radically (and theoretically) environmental. What do I know, I raise a lot of my food organically, have my own lines of genetics, save my own seed, and really like cows. Plus I eat deer, bear, moose and turkeys. It is almost impossible to garden organically without manure, which requires livestock, which requires eating meat and dairy.

I went to visit a friend in Nova Scotia and found the entire valley was missing, strip mined. Huge machines that looked like dinosaurs in the dawn light, parked in a wasteland that looked like the painted desert without the colors. I can't describe how it made me feel, I used to go there all the time. Rich bottom land, pheasants, foxes etc. I'm not against coal, just strip mining without any effort at reclamation. Many of my friends worked the mines, they lost their jobs to strip mining.
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