Is it wise to buy a boat that you don't love?? - Page 3 - SailNet Community
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post #21 of 36 Old 11-05-2006
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i'm going to try to be as diplomatic as possible, but absent buying a floating condo, some of the trade-offs are well..just that. steep companionways usually mean lots of headroom below. separate shower/head combinations mean you sacrifice space elsewhere. as a chef, i doubt there is a sailing cook that wouldn't want more galley space..but..you compromise here and try to be efficient in your prep and cooking. i don't even know what to say about the bed situation..unless you buy a gunboat or something and have a monster stateroom, just be quiet or have the person who usually gets up first sleep on the outside of the berth ...
i say buy sturdy and built for your needs and sailing plans for the near term.
this is probably an indelicate and wholly inappropriate question...but how old are you, and what is your sailing experience...the only reason i ask.."the going down below while underway and steep companionway" aspect set off alarm bells for some reason..or maybe i should just myob and go back to painting trim in my gym...

By three methods we may learn wisdom: first, by reflection, which is noblest,second is by imitation, which is easiest,third is by experience, which is the bitterest.






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post #22 of 36 Old 11-05-2006
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Is It Wise To Buy A Boat You Don't Love

No

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post #23 of 36 Old 11-05-2006
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I would go with that nagging feeling you have inside that says "BUY IT" or "DON"T BUY". The perfect boat doesn't exist, but you know what your hot buttons are. The admiral and I recently looked at a boat we wanted to like, a Beneteau 38s5. It looked great on paper and is well recommended. We found so many things about the design of the boat that bugged us, the boat itself was in very nice condition. We talked about it all day after seeing it, but when we got up the next morning we both agreed it was the wrong boat, the "DON"T BUY" was clear.

There is just no substitute for looking at lots of boats. We use reason to narrow the choices but when it comes down to it it's feeling that make the sale.

Let us know what you decide.
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post #24 of 36 Old 11-05-2006
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Before we bought Raven I fell head over heals with an advertisement. Kept the images on my desktop for months but because she was some 1500km from where we live it took a while to get to see the actual boat. I was a touch disappointed by the reality while my partner simply came up with a couple of irrefutable arguments a to why not. She was absolutely correct but I still love that boat and still keep a photo of her in my screensaver file.
Then when we finally found Raven I was definitely not in love. She is steel and smaller than I wanted but madam was happy and I was sick and tired of looking. We test sailed her in light airs and she seemed ok but after we owned her and had sailed her a couple of times I was almost inconsolable. Never had I sailed a boat that was such a pig in anything over 15 knots. No wonder the seller told me he rarely used more than one sail. Two up it was like a major arm wrestle and I was losing every time.
So we completely retuned the rig. Started from scratch, did it by the textbook with a lot of help from a sailmaker and a mate who seriously knows his stuff re rigs. Result ? Not hard to guess the answer, no more weather helm, better pointing ability, greater speed in all conditions although while she will never be a light air screamer she makes, shall we say, stately progress. Now when we are out and it starts to blow, I just feel like wrapping her up and giving her a big hug she feels so good. When we leave her I always give her a pat on the bum and a big thankyou. She is most definitely my other woman. Love is not always at first sight.

Andrew

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“Life is a trick, and you get one chance to learn it.”
― Terry Pratchett.
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post #25 of 36 Old 11-05-2006
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What's love got to do with it?

I've been waiting to see some of the responses to this thread, and have ended up with the same nagging thought as sanctuarysam. That being said, here's my two cents:
Which vintage car would you rather own? A Mazda RX-7 or a Jaguar E-type? Having been there I can say that the Mazda is the far better car for 98% of my driving and proved to be quite nice in all aspects. But, then I'd just look at the Jag and remember the few times the SU carbs were tuned just right, of course forgetting about wipers that don't work in the rain, head lights that don't work nights, and a heater box that par-boils your foot until it rusts out. Depends on where you're at right now. Single/no obligations-Jag. Married/expected to actually be someplace on time-Mazda.
Boats, like sports cars, are not a necessity and so different ones make sense at different times. Some men actually carry this thinking into the realm of relations with the fairer sex, but I wouldn't go there myself.
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post #26 of 36 Old 11-06-2006 Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for the replies .

sanctuarysam to answer your question my wife and I are both in out late thirties and in good health. When I wrote about the steep companionway I was talking specifically about the KP44, the bottom half is a vertical ladder. So copared to other boats I have been on and sailed I would call it steeper than average. Our sailing experience is limited to lake sailing in our 21 foot daysailer for the last five years. We have taken courses and bareboated as well. We recognize that we are novices to some extent, and will hire an instructor to teach us our new boat for the first week or as long as we need to feel confident.

Thanks to everybody that responded I believe I can live with the boat and feel that after we have "bonded" I will learn to love her.
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post #27 of 36 Old 11-06-2006
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Kmclarke-

I hope the sea trial and survey go well...if so, good luck and I hope you grow to love the boat... a boat that isn't loved is often not sailed or maintained anywhere near as well as one that is loved.




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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #28 of 36 Old 11-06-2006
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eryka is better of loving her husband and simply liking her boat than to have it the other way around. I am sure ideally you would want to love the boat too.

It's probably easier to get a divorce than it is to sell an unloved boat. It would stay on the market for a long time and be a constant pain the arse....well come to think of it, so would an ex-wife I suppose.
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post #29 of 36 Old 11-06-2006
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As a long time real estate broker and sailor I have this final bit of advice on how to proceed ( I have helped people with much larger purchases than this by using this method).
step one. Look at a couple more boats on the short list, JUST A COUPLE
step two. Put away all info about boats and stop discussing and thinking about for 3 days. If vacation time is due then take one so that you will not be thinking about the boat.
step three. Make decision.

Magically you will know what to do as your subconcience will sort it out.
I am no joking, I have seen people use this to sucess on the purchase of their largest lifetime expendeture.

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post #30 of 36 Old 11-06-2006
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Yes, the subconscious mind is better at making big decsions than the "rational" conscious mind is.




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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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