Are there any boats to completely avoid? - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 68 Old 08-02-2017
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Re: Are there any boats to completely avoid?

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Originally Posted by kd3pc View Post
bucaneer
chrysler
chriscraft

more problem than they are worth. Even when new, they were marginal sailing vessels, and worse construction.

An S&S designed Chris Craft is a marginal sailor?
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post #12 of 68 Old 08-02-2017
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Re: Are there any boats to completely avoid?

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Originally Posted by RegisteredUser View Post
Until you understand the extreme differences between boats within your set parameters, 24'-35', I would stay away from all boats...



Take some time looking, spending time around and on many different types of boats, and learning more about how you hope to use a boat.


Best advice on the whole thread


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post #13 of 68 Old 08-02-2017
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Re: Are there any boats to completely avoid?

I have owned Shiva, a Contest 36s for 32 years.... and sailed the boat over 40K miles.... and I am not an expert.... despite know a lot about THIS particular boat. I can recommend it... but haven't much to say about any other boats other than my personal opinion about functionality/architecture.

But who has enough experience to know the lemons out there???? a broker? a rigger? a mechanic? a sail maker? Not me...
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post #14 of 68 Old 08-02-2017
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Re: Are there any boats to completely avoid?

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Originally Posted by jorgenl View Post
Hunters... all of them ;-)
Jorgenl, you'll likely tick off Smacky... and the Cherubini designs are quite good, and rugged, very few argue against that.

We can all throw out specific models of boats that had endless issues. But thinking back, how many of them were completely the designers fault?

the Mac 26x is a great boat, if you want a motor-sailor. Lousy sailing characteristics though.

The Hunter and Mac bashing are tired old mantras... I submit that there are horses for courses.

MINI MOO, a 1983 Wavelength 24 - she's a fast cow!
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post #15 of 68 Old 08-02-2017
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Re: Are there any boats to completely avoid?

Stay away from any boat model owned by any ******** troll poster on this thread acting like some boat expert.

Don't blow air up my rear, be useful and blow it at the sails!
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post #16 of 68 Old 08-03-2017
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Re: Are there any boats to completely avoid?

Every boat is a project... even if you buy it new.

Constant need for maintenance and repairs.

The one to avoid is the one without a clear title.
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post #17 of 68 Old 08-03-2017
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Exclamation Re: Are there any boats to completely avoid?

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Originally Posted by Mattbastard View Post
I've heard this before about the AV27. That that one fella who took a free one around the Americas show's what she's capable of even when neglected. My only beef was he said a lot of water got in. I'm hoping it's because of neglect, not by design.
On our Ballad the stuffing box liked to leak ... not a lot; but it would leak. Fixed and the bilges were pretty dry. They are very tough boats, but certainly not with out their faults. The Vega Owners group are supposed to be pretty helpful group of folks.

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post #18 of 68 Old 08-03-2017
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Re: Are there any boats to completely avoid?

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Originally Posted by SHNOOL View Post
Jorgenl, you'll likely tick off Smacky... and the Cherubini designs are quite good, and rugged, very few argue against that.

.
Yep - but he did not take the bait. ;-)

They (Hunters) are all death traps ;-)
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post #19 of 68 Old 08-03-2017
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Re: Are there any boats to completely avoid?

Mattbastard: I think your question is valid, but may I recommend a different approach?

Surfing the net is too exhausting and the information you stumble upon is always questionable. Try to limit your reading to people who have at least attempted to make a serious study of the matter and convey the information in a coherent manner. I recommend that you read the book Your First Sailboat, by Daniel Spurr. Mr. Spurr describes various criteria and to which type of sailor they apply. He then describes many sailboats and details how well the boats fit the criteria. Using that approach, one can fairly easily come up with boat features that are must-have, wanna-have, and must-avoid. From there, a list of must-avoid models can be populated. This list will probably look different for each person who makes one.

I don't remember if it was in Spurr's or one of Casey's books, but there was a very strong admonishment that the first-time sailboat owner should avoid boat hulls made of wood, metal, or concrete.
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post #20 of 68 Old 08-03-2017 Thread Starter
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Re: Are there any boats to completely avoid?

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Originally Posted by RegisteredUser View Post
Until you understand the extreme differences between boats within your set parameters, 24'-35', I would stay away from all boats...

Take some time looking, spending time around and on many different types of boats, and learning more about how you hope to use a boat.
Thank you for your input, but I'd like to clarify something.

Spinning this around a bit, I've been a motorcyclist for over two decades. I'd consider myself well versed in many things motorcycling, old and new. Having owned 31 different motorcycles and ridden into the 50's, I've got a pretty good understanding of the quirks that tend to come "genetically" within each brand, generally speaking.

Now, spin this back around to sailboats. I'm not planning on buying anything this moment, but once I'm ASA 103/104 certified I'm certainly going to be in the market. Thus far I've narrowed down my list of needs to full head and galley. Everything else I want is offered on boats smaller but don't have a full head or galley. My sailing goals in the near term are coastal cruises with overnight stays to Catalina, and down Baja. After the hook is set I'll reassess the boats capabilities with my desires and consider something more bluewater capable but initially, my list of needs is pretty concise. What I've seen so far is a minimum of 27' (Catalina 27 or 30) and around here range from $3000 to over $15K.

Your comment says "extreme differences..." Other than how the boat is outfitted (from stripped racer to full head and galley), how the hull is designed (racer, cruiser, bluewater capable, etc...), and how it actually feels under sail, what else needs to be considered?

I ask because your comment has me feeling like I'm never going to be on the water due to lack of experience. With motorcycles, $200 gets you a rental on many of the brands out there, and if you want to own they're cheap enough to flip over the course of a year with minimal losses and ease of title transfer and storage. Boats, not so much IMO.
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