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post #21 of 36 Old 11-28-2017
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Re: Dinghy towing line recommendation

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Originally Posted by chef2sail View Post
I tired of towing a dinghy . All the machinations and constantly looking back. We once caught it on a crab pot line. Having to pull the engine on the rail on any sort of longer trip. Dealing with maneuvering it when going into the slip or pulling up to get fuel/ pumpout. I saw no advantage to doing that Once we installed davits ( you have them too.) . It simplified things in terms of recovery and aggravation. Especially docking . Our 6:1 Garhauer davits make lifting the dinghy easy and a simple quick process, even tough it blocks the stern ladder .

Our prolypropaline dinghy towing line with bridal and center float has not moved out of our locker in almost 8 years now.
That's one solution.... towing for me is no problem at all.... I use a demountable Garhaurer crane to lift the OB and stow it on the rail... (I can work on it there too easily if need be)... Lift the OB takes a few minutes and a child has the strength to do it... I am sure less than lifting a dink. I don't do slips and coming along side for fuel, water or boarding passengers simply means towing the dink with the bow line only tied off to port as I come along starboard side to. When we do a trip I attach the bridle rig... two snap hooks to the tow rings... takes a minute... tied them off to stern cleats. It takes a couple of minutes to trim the dink once underway and that depends on conditions... we tow it close until we're on our way so to speak.

We use the boarding ladder on the transom from the dink which works fine too.

Davits are extremely ugly in my opinion despite they're being practical. Aesthetics are very important to me. Same applies to the bimini...practicle for being behind the helm, but ugly as hell Don't need one because I don't drive the boat from the helm... AP does it. I would use davits offshore and would ONLY have stowed dink. I have two dinks... one with an inflatable floor... which will be used for passages.

Davits seem to be increasingly popular in the high 30s to mid 40s boats.

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Re: Dinghy towing line recommendation

[QUOTE=SanderO;2051298418]That's one solution.... towing for me is no problem at all.... I use a demountable Garhaurer crane to lift the OB and stow it on the rail... (I can work on it there too easily if need be)... Lift the OB takes a few minutes and a child has the strength to do it... I am sure less than lifting a dink. I don't do slips and coming along side for fuel, water or boarding passengers simply means towing the dink with the bow line only tied off to port as I come along starboard side to. When we do a trip I attach the bridle rig... two snap hooks to the tow rings... takes a minute... tied them off to stern cleats. It takes a couple of minutes to trim the dink once underway and that depends on conditions... we tow it close until we're on our way so to speak.

We use the boarding ladder on the transom from the dink which works fine too.

Davits are extremely ugly in my opinion despite they're being practical. Aesthetics are very important to me. Same applies to the bimini...practicle for being behind the helm, but ugly as hell Don't need one because I don't drive the boat from the helm... AP does it. I would use davits offshore and would ONLY have stowed dink. I have two dinks... one with an inflatable floor... which will be used for passages.

Davits seem to be increasingly popular in the high




There’s a reason davits are increasing popular. They easier than towing and jűst as easy as using an engine lift . A child San use our Garhauer davits . We also have a detachable Garhauer engine hoist and from first hand experience it’s just as easy to use the davits as the hoist. Most people who have gotten them I have found tend to use their dinghies more often,

As far as aesthetics I don’t consider myself qualified as a judge of what is more aesthetic or not for others on their boats. Maybe you do. I don’t see where davits is anymore hideous than a rolled up piece of plastic on the foredeck, or pretending you are a tugboat by towing a small bathtub. As far as a dodger, We actually have a very protective dodger. Well made by my wife. It allows us to sail well into December and in March as well as in all types of weather. Many of us who have them enjoy the protection it affords us . On longer trips being comfortable and less exposed to hard elements mat actually keep us fresher and more alert in some conditions.

Not sure I would be so judgmental of others preferences in such vivid terms,as to what they add to their vessel. but to each his own. What ever gets people to enjoy their sailing that’s what is important IMHO

Oh and when it comes to sailing we love the feeling of the helm and do not hand over to Robby the Robot unless we are taking longer trips or I am singlehanding and need to....we love the pure sailing feel of the helm in our hands.
My wife has become a better sailing by steering the boat as opposed to allowing the “cloud robot “ to take over. She actually enjoys the feeling of sailing Haleakula.

Rick sorry to digress here. Back to your original ask. This is the bridal we have and have 70 feet of yellow of New England tow line in the lazzarette collecting dust for an emergency. Have 2X the length of the boat seems more than enough for any situations we found ourself in. Usually we had less than 1/2 out depending on sea state. The bridal allows equal pull and distributed shock dispersal At the moment of the pullingload .


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post #23 of 36 Old 11-29-2017 Thread Starter
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Re: Dinghy towing line recommendation

To clarify for all, I do have davits. But last season whenever we spent consecutive nights in two different anchorages, we towed the dinghy. We were sailing inshore, generally in gentle conditions. Hopefully our new dinghy will be easier to hoist in the davits, and we'll choose to not use a tow rope. But I ordered some just in case, since I would like to have a floating rope available with good hand, instead of the crap polypropylene braided stuff that I have now. I could still cancel the rope order, since WM has it on backorder, but I think I'll stick with it.

chef - I'd like some hints on how to best attach my new inflatable-floor dinghy for both towing and for hoisting in the davits. The stern is easy because of the lifting points on the transom. But the bow is tougher, because I don't want to end up ripping off the D-rings. For davits, do you just use the internal D-rings on each side, or do you have a strap that goes through the external towing D-rings, then under the hull to keep the stress off the D-rings? With the inflatable floor, there is no hard attachment point at the bow like there is at the transom.

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Re: Dinghy towing line recommendation

@che f...

I comment for my own views on my boat. Other sailors can do whatever pleases them. I would never say anything insulting to another person about aesthetics. I was not intending to insult you or sailors with davits or biminis. I also have a dodger and I love it.... It kinda low but it does the job... Helming to to fuel dock I can see over it and don't look through the plastic windows

Lifting the motor is part of sailing prep. When we are cruising we just toss the bridle in the dink in port detaching the snap hook on the double tow line and leave it in the cockpit tied to the cleats... ready to go by snapping it on the the bridle.

Most of my sailing for the last 10 years or so was in southern NE and up to main. I've been in nasty conditions... but never had a problem with the dink. It has on a few occasions slide down a wave and almost reached the transom.... but this is hardly a reason to install davits. Steering is often boring and when that's the case I use the AP... and then I can trim, navigate, plan, watch, cook, use the head, repair something and so forth. My wife doesn't steer and refuses to. So different strokes as they say.

I don't lash the dink to the bow but stow it in a cockpit locker on passage.

Towing can be easy and reliable. It DOES slow the passage when the dink has a foul bottom.

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post #25 of 36 Old 11-29-2017
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Re: Dinghy towing line recommendation

Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeFive View Post
To clarify for all, I do have davits. But last season whenever we spent consecutive nights in two different anchorages, we towed the dinghy. We were sailing inshore, generally in gentle conditions. Hopefully our new dinghy will be easier to hoist in the davits, and we'll choose to not use a tow rope. But I ordered some just in case, since I would like to have a floating rope available with good hand, instead of the crap polypropylene braided stuff that I have now. I could still cancel the rope order, since WM has it on backorder, but I think I'll stick with it.

chef - I'd like some hints on how to best attach my new inflatable-floor dinghy for both towing and for hoisting in the davits. The stern is easy because of the lifting points on the transom. But the bow is tougher, because I don't want to end up ripping off the D-rings. For davits, do you just use the internal D-rings on each side, or do you have a strap that goes through the external towing D-rings, then under the hull to keep the stress off the D-rings? With the inflatable floor, there is no hard attachment point at the bow like there is at the transom.
The key here is to have the dinghy tight with no movement to chafe it or ut unnecessary strain on the D rings. Once cinched the dinghy is one with the boat. This is very important as there is no motion

I use the internal d rings

We use two adjustable web straps for the D rings and the thru transome bolts. Each stap has two legs kand attaches to the rings coming together to a stainless O ring. The O ring attaches to the davit lifting line one each end. To keep the weight off the davits we use simple 1” webstraps 18 ft long pulled in tight to the stern rail. Two small fenders attached to the stern rail permanent serve as a cradle also. The D rings were fine for 9 years and only this year I had- to re- glue one on.


We stayed away from the slings as we felt the rub would saw through the dinghy fabric" remember we also have a dinghy cover which prevents strap rub also. Took it off last week or I could send a pic.

We use something like the fifth on down.
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Re: Dinghy towing line recommendation

Not sure how much role aestethics need to play in dinghy stowage. I had davits on my last boat, and don't even recall thinking about how it looked.

Stern tow I rarely used, just for short hops, an hour or less. Medium distance and fair to moderate conditions, it would go in the davits and in nasty or unknown conditions it would go on the foredeck, it is a hard shell, so stowage below wasn't an option. I got pooped a couple of times with it in the davits, which resulted in a gong show.

My current boat is too small for davits and too weight sensitive to have it on deck, so I have to tow, which means I often don't bring it with me.

Bimini is the same. I like it because it keeps the rain off my head, but if it's really windy, I'll fold it down to improve aerodynamics.
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Re: Dinghy towing line recommendation

Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeFive View Post
To clarify for all, I do have davits. But last season whenever we spent consecutive nights in two different anchorages, we towed the dinghy. We were sailing inshore, generally in gentle conditions. Hopefully our new dinghy will be easier to hoist in the davits, and we'll choose to not use a tow rope. But I ordered some just in case, since I would like to have a floating rope available with good hand, instead of the crap polypropylene braided stuff that I have now. I could still cancel the rope order, since WM has it on backorder, but I think I'll stick with it.
It’s always a good idea to have a floating painter for those times you are at anchor and choose to leave the dink in the water overnight or for a day or two. You never know when you may have to—or want to—move your boat on short notice in a crowded anchorage or when you may want to deploy a second anchor. Your NER dinghy line purchase is money well spent.

BTW, I’ve had inflatables set up for bridles for over 20 years but we have never used a bridle. Despite getting caught in some unexpectedly snotty conditions while towing with a painter, we’ve never had a problem. Our heavier RIB, with its V hull tracks better than the roll-up (inflatable shallow keel) and its heavy enough that we don’t worry about it flipping over under the conditions that we are willing to sail in. That said, we would haul the lighter dinghy on deck when in doubt.
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Re: Dinghy towing line recommendation

When on the mooring or anchored our dink is secured by a single dinghy pennant to the bow eye (alum hull). We keep it quite close in despite the line being 30' or so because it also is the security line when towing and the tow is usually at least 20 feet or more astern.

Floating lines are not necessary. If I had to quickie fire up the engine and move... the pennant is easy reach from the helm and I can loop it around a winch to shorten it by several feet without even untying the cleat. If I am backing I shorten is way in as necessary from the helm.

Current dink...
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Re: Dinghy towing line recommendation

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Originally Posted by SanderO View Post
When on the mooring or anchored our dink is secured by a single dinghy pennant to the bow eye (alum hull). We keep it quite close in despite the line being 30' or so because it also is the security line when towing and the tow is usually at least 20 feet or more astern.

Floating lines are not necessary. If I had to quickie fire up the engine and move... the pennant is easy reach from the helm and I can loop it around a winch to shorten it by several feet without even untying the cleat. If I am backing I shorten is way in as necessary from the helm..

Floating lines are not necessary if you always remember to bring the dink in short. Not being perfect, there are those few times I was grateful for a floating line. When sailing, backups (e.g., floating line) are good.
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Re: Dinghy towing line recommendation

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Floating lines are not necessary if you always remember to bring the dink in short. Not being perfect, there are those few times I was grateful for a floating line. When sailing, backups (e.g., floating line) are good.
As to the importance of a floating line, consider the situation that you fall overboard on a breezy day, the well-trained SO manages her/his panic and successfully maneuvers the boat back near you, starting the engine and engaging the gear to maintain position. Who can't see what comes next?

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Last edited by sailingfool; 11-29-2017 at 02:30 PM.
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