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post #71 of 105 Old 01-01-2018
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Re: Narrow Channels Rule 9(b)

@Arcb raises a great question, and it could be a "hot potato," but I'll try to help. I am curious about where @Arcb 's power boat syllabus comes from.

For a fee, ASA provides their affiliate schools with a series of textbooks, and assessments (tests), and end of course evaluations, among other things (marketing, etc.). ASA does NOT provide common course materials. Every school is expected to use the ASA materials and assessments, and combine them with (stellar) instruction onboard the school's boats to prepare the student to pass the ASA written test and to demonstrate on the water skills. The quality and consistency of the instruction and the boats can vary from school to school.

The latest ASA textbooks are; Sailing Made Easy (101), Coastal Cruising Made Easy (103), and Bareboat Cruising Made Easy (104). There is no mention of Rule 9 in Sailing Made Easy. In Sailing Made Easy the COLREGS presented are; rule 5 (lookout), rule 18 (sail over power), rule 13 (overtaking), rule 12 (sailing), rule 14 (head-on), rule 15 (crossing), rule 16 (action by give way), rule 17 (action by stand on) in that order on pages 90-93.

In Coastal Cruising Made Easy (103) the rules presented are; rule 5, rule 12, rule 13, rule 14, rule 18 and rule 10 (in that order). RULE 9 is presented in a separate green box (usually reserved for a relevant tip - usually skipped by the casual reader) at the lower right of page 86. The specific text in the box states:
Quote:
RULE 9: NARROW CHANNELS
Rule 9 states: "A vessel less than 20 meters in length or a sailing vessel shall not impede the passage of any other vessel navigating within a narrow channel or fairway."
If you are sailing or motoring in or near a marked channel, be on the lookout for larger vessels that may be restricted to navigating within that channel. Even overtaking situations, which are cut and dried in open waters, require cooperation and communication between the overtaking and the overtaken. Don't cross a channel if by doing so you will impede a vessel navigating within the channel.
The need to be aware of the COLREGS, and a brief review is presented in Bareboat Cruising Made Easy on pages 106, and page 107 is a summary of rules 12-15. But there is no mention of rule 9 in the current 104 textbook. It is strange to me that the current version has only a summary. In the old 104 textbook, Cruising Fundamentals, there was a complete review of rules 1-19 on pages 68 through 72.

An ASA 101 student could, therefore, have read the book and passed the exam while never being made aware of Rule 9.
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Last edited by eherlihy; 01-02-2018 at 07:21 PM.
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Re: Narrow Channels Rule 9(b)

Makes sense E. I am working with unfamiliar territory here (sailing school syllabus).

I was responding to this post and the NABLA link provided. If you click on the link there is what appears to be minimum guidelines for both basic power boat and sailboat courses. This is not territory I know the ins and outs of, I just read the link and responded. I have never even taken a cruising sailboat course, much less taught one.

In fact, any boating training program in the US that conforms with the ANSI standards published by NABLA https://www.nasbla.org/nasblamain/ed...l-ed-standards will not, as it's not in the agenda.

Like I said though, nearly every boater I encounter knows to stay to the starboard side of the channel, so its clear to me the information is getting out there, even if its just pier to pier education. It might not be framed as rule 9, it might just be somebody saying something along the lines of, its like driving down the road, you stay the right.

For whatever reason, the lady in the OPs scenario didn't get the message.

Last edited by Arcb; 01-01-2018 at 11:40 AM.
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Re: Narrow Channels Rule 9(b)

Quote:
FWIW - I have also taught courses for a US\Sailing affiliate. The rules are not mentioned by number in Basic Keelboat. However, this is the relevant section of how COLREGS are addressed;

Sailboats have right of way over powerboats:
Except when powerboat is
  • Anchored
  • Capsized
  • Aground
  • Towing
  • Fishing (commercial)
  • On official business
  • Commercial vessel in narrow channel
  • Being overtaken
A rowboat or paddleboat has right of way over a sailboat
Isn't that interesting. I see no reference in the actual regulations that a narrow channel has anything to do with a commercial vessel. The fact that there is so much confusion around this subject is becoming pretty clear. On the one hand it seems rarely or obscurely taught at all. On the other, this commercial reference just seems incorrect.

I would think Rule 9 was written to allow for the orderly transit of traffic within a channel. We all know that what's outside the channel can still contain uncharted hazards to navigation. You also could never tell if the vessel in the channel needs to be there for draft reasons. Therefore, I see why a sailboat is told not to impede other vessels (ie use their privilege) that are trying to stay in the channel (ie proceed along it's course). It just makes sense.


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post #74 of 105 Old 01-01-2018
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Re: Narrow Channels Rule 9(b)

I learned from one ASA instructor who presented rule 9 this way; "When in a channel, you always stay to the right side. Just like when driving a car - in any civilized country." As much as this usually got a chuckle, I felt that it kind of glossed over the importance of recognizing when you are in a channel (ATONs on either side), and not impeding any other traffic despite the fact that traffic may involve sail vs power.

However, it seems that the statement in the little green box of the ASA 103 book directly pertains to the situation from your OP... In effect, this is an extra burden upon vessels of less than 20 meters and sailboats. Now if only everybody would read what's in the little green box...


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post #75 of 105 Old 01-01-2018
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Re: Narrow Channels Rule 9(b)

CiviliSed

You lot of Neanderthals can't even spell it!


Anyway, I never made any such claim. I drive right up that white painted line thingy.
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Re: Narrow Channels Rule 9(b)

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
The next day the harbormaster dropped by to say the sailor had complained. He told me not to worry and that it wouldn't happen again, as he had kicked the fool out of the marina on the basis that the marina rules clearly stated that it was prohibited to sail in or out of the harbor.
Just wonderin' where would one find these marina rules, and do they carry any legal weight?

I ask because while shadowing another instructor (he teach, I watch) we sailed into a narrow cove with several (12!) marinas. A guy on one of the docks yelled that we weren't supposed to sail there, as it was a narrow channel. There was no other traffic in the cove, and we weren't interfering with anyone on that day (early in the season). I have never brought my classes in there because it seems fraught with peril for little gain. However, the incident did cause me to wonder if the guy on the dock knew something that the other instructor and I didn't.


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Re: Narrow Channels Rule 9(b)

Quote:
Originally Posted by eherlihy View Post
Just wonderin' where would one find these marina rules, and do they carry any legal weight?
I don't know about marinas, but I know of lots of narrow channels where sailing is prohibited. Burlington Canal is a short narrow channel providing access to Hamilton Harbour, which is a major steel port on Lake Ontario.

Rule 8 of the Burlington Canal regulations, which is a Federal Statute, so it definitely carries weight:

8 No vessel shall operate under sail in the canal.

I have found at least one statute that defines a vessel that can only operate within a narrow channel too. Its
the port of Southampton, and the minimum criteria is 150 meters or 450 ft.

http://www.cowesharbourcommission.co...no_10_of_2016:

The Southampton Harbour Byelaws enforces the requirement that all vessels over 150 metres in length when navigating in the Precautionary Area referred to in this notice are automatically allocated a Moving Prohibited Zone (MPZ). The MPZ is an area extending 1000 metres ahead and 100 metres either side of any vessel greater than 150 metres within the Precautionary Area.

The Master of a small vessel (less than 20 metres in length or a sailing vessel) shall ensure that his vessel does not enter a Moving Prohibited Zone.
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Re: Narrow Channels Rule 9(b)

@Arcb Thanks - yes I know that there are several canals - the Cape Cod Canal is one that I have transited many times - where sailing is prohibited. I was just wondering if this was easily referencable from one source.

from http://www.nae.usace.army.mil/Portal...fety_Guide.pdf
Quote:
ē Sailing vessels are required to have and use auxiliary power during passage throughout the Canal. Use of sails while motoring is permitted. But, large course changes and/or tacking are strictly prohibited in the landcut and approach channels
I don't know of such a document for Warwick Cove though...


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Re: Narrow Channels Rule 9(b)

FWIW - I have also taught courses for a US\Sailing affiliate. The rules are not mentioned by number in Basic Keelboat. However, this is the relevant section of how COLREGS are addressed;
Sailboats have right of way over powerboats:
Except when powerboat is
  • Anchored
  • Capsized
  • Aground
  • Towing
  • Fishing (commercial)
  • On official business
  • Commercial vessel in narrow channel
  • Being overtaken
A rowboat or paddleboat has right of way over a sailboat[/quote]

Why not teach the actual rules.

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Re: Narrow Channels Rule 9(b)

Hereís an interesting piece I clipped off a website:

Quote:
On 22nd of March 2008, an Ukrainian flagged oil rig supply vessel NEGTEGAZ 67 collided with Chinese flagged panamax bulk carrier Yao Hi. The collision took place in the western approaches of Hong Kong harbour. The supply vessel sank because of this collision and 18 of the 25 crew died. Captain of the supply vessel was found to have breached rule 9 (Narrow channel) because he did not keep on the starboard side of the channel. There were number of debates on the courtís finding which considered this to be a narrow channel. Many experts did not agree with the courtís decision that it was a narrow channel. The experts argued that even outside this buoyed channel, there was sufficient sea room for the bulk carrier.

https://www.myseatime.com/blog/detai...-clarification
In this case, even though there was room to navigate outside the channel, the courts found that Rule 9 still applied.

In my case, I really donít think there even was reasonable room to maneuver outside the channel. Nevertheless, there are two overarching points.

First, if youíre the vessel doing the impeding, you canít know visually whether the vessel proceeding along the course of the channel is constrained in any way.

Second, the explicit purpose of any marked channel is to delineate safe passage. Expecting/forcing a vessel to exit that channel would require them to face potentially uncharted hazards. The vessel proceeding along the course of the channel is presumed to have made the determination they must remain within it.

It seems, according to my reading, these are the overarching reasons that the courts expect the prudent mariner to assume Rule 9 applies.

This follow, from explanatory notes on the ColRegs, was also interesting, although, Iím not sure of its authority:

Quote:
......a vessel which was required not to impede the passage of another vessel should take early action to allow sufficient sea room for the safe passage of the other vessel. Such vessel was obliged to fulfil this obligation also when taking avoiding action in accordance with the steering and sailing rules when risk of collision exists.

http://www.imcbrokers.com/frontend/f...tory-notes.pdf
This reads to me that a vessel is still obligated not to impede a vessel within a narrow channel, even if they are steering to avoid another vessel under another ColReg.

Rule 9 seems pretty solid.


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