What makes a good sailboat for large following seas? - SailNet Community
 54Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 39 Old 12-29-2018 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 8
Thanks: 24
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
What makes a good sailboat for large following seas?

My largest concern is coming into a New Jersey inlet with breaking following seas, pitch polling, and being swept sideways into the rock jetty. With power boats I can remain at a high enough speed to match the swell. With a cruising sailboat I canít do that.

Iím thinking a boat with a large skeg hung rudder would be best for handling such a situation.
What do you think ? Is there other items I should consider as I look at a purchasing a coastal cruiser ?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
skeggs is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 39 Old 12-29-2018
Senior Member
 
SchockT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: North Vancouver, BC
Posts: 1,878
Thanks: 2
Thanked 42 Times in 39 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Re: What makes a good sailboat for large following seas?

How big are these following seas you speak of, and how often do you expect to encounter them?

I dont think having a skeg hung rudder will make much difference if the seas are big enough to toss you sideways into the rocks! Getting into that kind of trouble is more likely going to be caused by bad helmsmanship not rudder design!

I think you are worrying too much about one particular scenario that you are not likely to encounter very often in coastal cruising. Get the boat that suits your every day cruising needs, then learn how that boat handles following seas.

Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
MarkofSeaLife and capta like this.

2011 Jeanneau 39i Azura
SchockT is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to SchockT For This Useful Post:
skeggs (12-30-2018)
post #3 of 39 Old 12-29-2018
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 1,102
Thanks: 114
Thanked 42 Times in 42 Posts
Rep Power: 3
 
Re: What makes a good sailboat for large following seas?

and gain the experience to judge when the best course of action is to Just Wait for acceptable conditions.

Sailing, not power boating.
MarkofSeaLife likes this.
john61ct is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to john61ct For This Useful Post:
skeggs (12-30-2018)
 
post #4 of 39 Old 12-29-2018
Senior Member
 
paulk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: CT/ Long Island Sound
Posts: 3,184
Thanks: 4
Thanked 76 Times in 75 Posts
Rep Power: 20
 
Re: What makes a good sailboat for large following seas?

Maybe something like this would be suitable:

They seem to be quick enough to stay out ahead of most of the breakers. No skegs visible.
Check Yachtworld for "IMOCA 60"
cb32863 likes this.

Last edited by paulk; 12-29-2018 at 04:25 PM.
paulk is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to paulk For This Useful Post:
skeggs (12-30-2018)
post #5 of 39 Old 12-29-2018
Senior Member
 
outbound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: NE & Windwards
Posts: 6,153
Thanks: 133
Thanked 183 Times in 176 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Surfing tons and tons of boat is a blast but requires a very responsive helm. From my limited experience the balance spade / fin combo is most immediately responsive. Depending on design it maybe one or two rudders. Some hold direct linkage or a tiller helps. Some believe worm gear or hydraulic steering should be avoided. Some feel being able to sense the sea throyour hand helps.

s/v Hippocampus
Outbound 46
outbound is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to outbound For This Useful Post:
skeggs (12-30-2018)
post #6 of 39 Old 12-29-2018
Moderator
 
MarkofSeaLife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: London!
Posts: 6,311
Thanks: 66
Thanked 296 Times in 268 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Dock
Re: What makes a good sailboat for large following seas?

What we call a Bar... not not with beer

The rule is to stay outside until the weather moderates... even if its days... I have done this particular entrance, the Southport Seaway in Australia... ummm its a tad scary.






Mark

Sea Life
Notes on a Circumnavigation:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


People can say they want freedom, but offer them the keys to what chains them, a map to where they want to go,
And they'll turn it down for the cell they know
MarkofSeaLife is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to MarkofSeaLife For This Useful Post:
skeggs (12-30-2018)
post #7 of 39 Old 12-29-2018
Senior Member
 
SanderO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Northport, NY
Posts: 3,357
Thanks: 2
Thanked 91 Times in 91 Posts
Rep Power: 13
 
Re: What makes a good sailboat for large following seas?

After the storm in the Marion Bermuda when we were thru the Stream we encountered immense following mountains of water. The rudder was almost useless and to not roll or broach we had to drive as straight as possible down the wave if memory serves me correctly. I can't even imagine trying to get through a narrow channel with immense following seas.

pay attention... someone's life depends on it
SanderO is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to SanderO For This Useful Post:
skeggs (12-30-2018)
post #8 of 39 Old 12-29-2018
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: The Bahamas
Posts: 3,529
Thanks: 3
Thanked 135 Times in 133 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Re: What makes a good sailboat for large following seas?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkofSeaLife View Post
What we call a Bar... not not with beer

The rule is to stay outside until the weather moderates... even if its days... I have done this particular entrance, the Southport Seaway in Australia... ummm its a tad scary.






Mark
thats a famous/popular one.
He caught it right.
There are situations where you dont get a mulligan.
Keep the grey cells tunned up
MarkofSeaLife likes this.
RegisteredUser is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to RegisteredUser For This Useful Post:
skeggs (12-30-2018)
post #9 of 39 Old 12-30-2018 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 8
Thanks: 24
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Re: What makes a good sailboat for large following seas?

Thank you for your replies.

Im considering a cruising sailboat which is 30 to 34 ft in length. The idea of a skeg rudder is that the increase resistance will help keep the stern from slipping. I believe Bill Crealock had this in mind when designing the Pacific Seacraft 34 and 37. Compare those boats to a spade rudder boat of the same era such as the Pearson 34 or 33. Given the shallow shoals of NJ a deep keel is not an option. Here is a photo which is not an uncommon situation. Its my many years of experience which is telling me to prepare for handling the bad before going out, and in this case, consider it when selecting the boat. Im also considering it with where Iím going to dock her and what inlet Im going to be using. While the admiral will compare interiors, Im trying to find the proper fit, marrying dock, bay, inlet, boat.




Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
SanderO likes this.
skeggs is offline  
post #10 of 39 Old 12-30-2018
Moderator
 
MarkofSeaLife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: London!
Posts: 6,311
Thanks: 66
Thanked 296 Times in 268 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Dock
Re: What makes a good sailboat for large following seas?

Quote:
Originally Posted by skeggs View Post
Its my many years of experience which is telling me to prepare for handling the bad before going out, and in this case, consider it when selecting the boat.

If you know the particular port as you appear to, then I would be sitting on that breakwater and watching what boats go in an out... or more importantly what boats don't use it at all, and which boats do well or poorly.
Then I would dockwalk the local marinas and do a survey, and chat to owners.

Local knowledge is 200% of the battle in some places.

Just an example I can think: Is this particular entrance straight? or does one have to surf and do a dog-leg at the same time?

BTW I think the skeg thing is a red herring. If 40 year old design principles were principals they would be used now. They are not. But thats only my opinion, half the forum thinks anything built before the 1880's is better than anything built today

PS Is your User name and your liking for skegs any correlation?

Mark
skeggs likes this.

Sea Life
Notes on a Circumnavigation:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


People can say they want freedom, but offer them the keys to what chains them, a map to where they want to go,
And they'll turn it down for the cell they know
MarkofSeaLife is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to MarkofSeaLife For This Useful Post:
skeggs (12-30-2018)
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fair winds and Following seas design. CoastLife General Discussion (sailing related) 0 05-23-2017 07:55 PM
Wellmet, fair winds and following seas. AnMjones Introduce Yourself 2 03-20-2010 08:55 AM
Fair Winds and Following Seas lsbrodsky Pacific Seacraft 10 03-25-2009 11:49 AM
A bit of following seas... CharlieCobra Seamanship & Navigation 30 01-11-2008 06:16 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome