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-   -   40 yr old teak decks (https://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/330662-40-yr-old-teak-decks.html)

overbored 07-21-2019 09:01 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
I don't understand why anyone would buy a boat that has systems that need to be maintained that have no real reason for being on the boat. Teak decks on a modern day fiberglass boat are a waste of time and money. I have sailed on boats with and without teak decks and the only thing that i got from a Teak deck that I did not get from a fiberglass deck was Splinters and burnt feet.

MikeOReilly 07-22-2019 07:13 AM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by overbored (Post 2051616172)
I don't understand why anyone would buy a boat that has systems that need to be maintained that have no real reason for being on the boat. Teak decks on a modern day fiberglass boat are a waste of time and money. I have sailed on boats with and without teak decks and the only thing that i got from a Teak deck that I did not get from a fiberglass deck was Splinters and burnt feet.

Well… there really is no reason to own a sailboat at all ;). It's pretty much the slowest, and most expensive way, to go anywhere. It certainly makes no rational sense to own one.

Teak makes an excellent non-skid in all sea conditions. It is warm and comfortable on the feet. It is aesthetically beautiful. It’s really not that hard to maintain — certainly no harder than many other boat systems.

If hard cold functionality really were the criteria by which we made decisions about boating, well, I think none of us would bother to own a sailboat ;).

SanderO 07-22-2019 08:37 AM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MikeOReilly (Post 2051616198)
....
Teak makes an excellent non-skid in all sea conditions. It is warm and comfortable on the feet. It is aesthetically beautiful. It’s really not that hard to maintain — certainly no harder than many other boat systems.

You shouldn't compare teak laid decks to other systems re maintenance. But it does take more time to maintain it than textured gelcoat or perhaps Treadmaster. Because it is screwed down is can lead to leaks. I don't know how long a well maintained teak decks will last before they need serious attention. My textured gelcoat surface is as good as it was when new 35 years on. My sense is teak takes more time to keep looking good than non skid gelcoat.

Teak certainly is attractive and non skid. I would be concerned with very old teak decks... but all things being equal it needed be a deal breaker.

overbored 07-22-2019 12:25 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MikeOReilly (Post 2051616198)
Well… there really is no reason to own a sailboat at all ;). It's pretty much the slowest, and most expensive way, to go anywhere. It certainly makes no rational sense to own one.

Teak makes an excellent non-skid in all sea conditions. It is warm and comfortable on the feet. It is aesthetically beautiful. It’s really not that hard to maintain — certainly no harder than many other boat systems.

If hard cold functionality really were the criteria by which we made decisions about boating, well, I think none of us would bother to own a sailboat ;).

there are lots of reasons to own a sailboat, my one reason is enjoying life by going sailing. and i sail a slow sailboat not to get anywhere but to spend more time on a boat on the sea. it makes since to own one because if you don't it is hard to go sailing where and when you want. i do believe a power boat with twin diesels is a bit more expensive way to go somewhere

teak is very hot on your bare feet and splinters are a sure thing, teak never looks good unless it is varnished and requires several more hours of maintenance each year. and it is not will it leak it is going to leak because putting a million screws through a fiberglass deck is just a very bad idea.

it seems that you stated that there is no good reason to own a sail boat and the said there are lots of reasons to own one so which is it?
I know the answer, I don't have teak decks so I have more time to enjoy sailing and don't have to worry about when I will have to fix the leaking deck
if you enjoy having teak decks then fine you are the one that is paying for them in time and money.

capecodda 07-22-2019 12:52 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
I haven't met a boat owner who's honest with me or who hasn't taken up residence in some silted in harbor (in which case they have cheap housing, not really a boat), who doesn't care about what their boat looks like.

Now beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but IMHO teak decks are pretty darn attractive. They are also an excellent non-skid surface. Boat 4 of 5 had teak decks. I never got splinters, but my wallet sprang a definite leak :).

As they get older, the teak itself wears and the caulking between the boards starts to stand up higher than the boards. Then you can re-caulk, and maybe sand it a bit, till you get to the point that the bungs are gone and you are looking at the screws. Of course the potential leak points are numerous. I've seen newer construction where the teak is glued down which avoids the million screw holes. I've also watched as a board yard tried to remove that teak on a large yacht, not pretty or cheap.

IMHO, we all operate at different points when it comes to evaluating esthetics vs. maintenance cost/time. You can't say you spend zero time or dollars on esthetics, because I think for most of this that's a lie. Each of us pick an operating point we can live with and pay with either time or money.

IMHO, I would not buy a teak decked boat to save money, because the purchase price was low. Buying the is cheap part. Maintenance is where you pay. I would only buy one if I loved teak decks so much, I didn't care what the maintenance cost would be.

There's lots of boats out there, and the cost of curing a problem like old teak decks in time or money is not cheap.

Minnewaska 07-22-2019 01:47 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by overbored (Post 2051616258)
.....teak is very hot on your bare feet and splinters are a sure thing, teak never looks good unless it is varnished and requires several more hours of maintenance each year. and it is not will it leak it is going to leak because putting a million screws through a fiberglass deck is just a very bad idea.

Seems you might be describing these attributes from rumor. Yes, teak can get hot, but not instantly. If it's wet, it's never hot and yet still holds one's foot well. Better than many non-skid patterns. There are aggressive non-skid patterns or textures that always hold well. However, by definition, they are aggressive on your foot. Teak does have it's advantages.

No one ever varnishes a teak deck. That wouldn't make any sense, it would get slippery and lose all the properties one is looking for. Varnish is for trim, handholds and tables. Some will oil the decks, but that attracts dirt. Others will seal them with something like Semco, but it looks terrible, IMO.

As for routine maintenance, I let mine weather grey. A scrub with salt water weekly is a good idea. TDS makes a new one part Eco-cleaner that is amazing. It's bio-degradeable and you practically just lay it on, scrub lightly with a scotchbrite and rinse off. Done.

Many decks are glued down, but there are still some screw holes from the bracing that holds it in place, while waiting for the glue to cure. These are supposed to be filled. Often, they are not. In my case, I keep finding the actual screws, buried under the caulking.

Teak decks would not be a great idea, if you were in tropical climates 12 months out of the year. They would wear much more quickly and replacement is breathtakingly expensive.

MikeOReilly 07-22-2019 02:11 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by overbored (Post 2051616258)
there are lots of reasons to own a sailboat, my one reason is enjoying life by going sailing. and i sail a slow sailboat not to get anywhere but to spend more time on a boat on the sea. it makes since to own one because if you don't it is hard to go sailing where and when you want. i do believe a power boat with twin diesels is a bit more expensive way to go somewhere

teak is very hot on your bare feet and splinters are a sure thing, teak never looks good unless it is varnished and requires several more hours of maintenance each year. and it is not will it leak it is going to leak because putting a million screws through a fiberglass deck is just a very bad idea.

it seems that you stated that there is no good reason to own a sail boat and the said there are lots of reasons to own one so which is it?
I know the answer, I don't have teak decks so I have more time to enjoy sailing and don't have to worry about when I will have to fix the leaking deck
if you enjoy having teak decks then fine you are the one that is paying for them in time and money.

Geeze buddy, you come across as someone who needs to spend more time sailing. Chill out. My obviously too-subtle a point was that owning a sailboat is not a choice made through logic alone. It’s an emotional decision driven by aesthetics and personal taste. I find modern tupperware boats to be pretty ugly, and lacking any real character, but that’s my personal taste.

What I said was that if logic is the only driver, then you’re never going to justify owning a boat. You say the reason to own a sailboat is to go sailing, so by that rather circular logic, the reason to own a teak decked boat is because one likes teak under foot.

Teak decks should not be varnished. The reason teak is used, aside from their beauty, is because the natural oils keeps them healthy and beautiful. I don’t get splinters in my feet. Nor do I find it particularly hot. But I sail more northerly waters, so perhaps I would way down south.

The issues with screwed in decks are very serious, and no one should buy an old “leaky teaky” without serious survey research, and going in ‘eyes wide open’ as to the potential issues. The OP’s question was should this be a deal breaker. I, and some others who appear to have actual experience living with these decks, advise that it isn’t necessarily a deal breaker (unless you just don’t like them, as you clearly don’t).

Minnewaska 07-22-2019 02:17 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by overbored (Post 2051616258)
....splinters are a sure thing....

Forgot to mention. I've never received a splinter from my own or anyone else's teak decks. This includes decks that are well past their prime, like my current decks. I suppose one could have exposed splinters, but a deck that bad would be really bad. It's very uncommon and not a sure thing.

overbored 07-22-2019 02:39 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Minnewaska (Post 2051616270)
Seems you might be describing these attributes from rumor. Yes, teak can get hot, but not instantly. If it's wet, it's never hot and yet still holds one's foot well. Better than many non-skid patterns. There are aggressive non-skid patterns or textures that always hold well. However, by definition, they are aggressive on your foot. Teak does have it's advantages.

No one ever varnishes a teak deck. That wouldn't make any sense, it would get slippery and lose all the properties one is looking for. Varnish is for trim, handholds and tables. Some will oil the decks, but that attracts dirt. Others will seal them with something like Semco, but it looks terrible, IMO.

As for routine maintenance, I let mine weather grey. A scrub with salt water weekly is a good idea. TDS makes a new one part Eco-cleaner that is amazing. It's bio-degradeable and you practically just lay it on, scrub lightly with a scotchbrite and rinse off. Done.

Many decks are glued down, but there are still some screw holes from the bracing that holds it in place, while waiting for the glue to cure. These are supposed to be filled. Often, they are not. In my case, I keep finding the actual screws, buried under the caulking.

Teak decks would not be a great idea, if you were in tropical climates 12 months out of the year. They would wear much more quickly and replacement is breathtakingly expensive.

not from rumor but from 65 years of experience of building, installing, using and sailing on deck decks. when I was 6 years old I had a all varnished teak wooden 12' sloop made by my father. my family had a real chinese junk with teak decks when I was 18 , in fact the whole boat was teak. My father owned a cabinet shop that did boat work and he was the teak guy. I know a little bit about teak. my current boat has teak toe rail and cockpit seats that are glued on not screwed, not one screw. the one thing I do not like about the current boat is the teak. I do like teak when varnished and did not say anything about varnish on a teak deck (I did have a wooden power boat that had varnished teak decks) simply said it does not look good to me unless it is varnished as in the interior. oiled teak is good on furniture but varnished looks best on the teak for a boat.

yes the scrub with salt water is good but who wants to do that weekly.
the older I get the less i want to have to spend time maintaining the boat and the more I want to sail it
done my time on several leaky teakys

overbored 07-22-2019 02:47 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Minnewaska (Post 2051616280)
Forgot to mention. I've never received a splinter from my own or anyone else's teak decks. This includes decks that are well past their prime, like my current decks. I suppose one could have exposed splinters, but a deck that bad would be really bad. It's very uncommon and not a sure thing.

Sail on them long enough and and it will and does happen. never happened to me but have seen some nasty ones. we would almost never go bare foot on the teak because when it is bare foot weather the deck is to hot to stand on when not wet


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