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post #21 of 35 Old 07-22-2019
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Re: 40 yr old teak decks

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Originally Posted by overbored View Post
...yes the scrub with salt water is good but who wants to do that weekly....
I'd wash the non-skid weekly too, so I don't see the difference.

I understand you're not a fan of teak decks, many aren't. That's fine. However, I think you've overstated your case.


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post #22 of 35 Old 07-22-2019
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Re: 40 yr old teak decks

There must be a reason why very few boats are being built with teak decks today. It's sort of like people arguing that the Atomic A4 had good qualities. Well, yea, if they were so great why did builders stop putting them in sailboats in the 1980s? For whatever reason, people don't want gas auxiliary engines (no matter how much quieter and smoother the A4 enthusiasts claim they are) and people don't want teak decks. Times change. If you don't care about resale some day, and are up for the challenge of maintaining and probably replacing the old teak decks, have at it. I think teak decks look and feel great, but they don't make sense on a modern cruising sailboat.
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post #23 of 35 Old 07-22-2019
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Re: 40 yr old teak decks

Ever since the great recession, it seems the production manufacturers that survived, have engineered cost out of the product. That includes removing virtually all real teak, not just the side decks. Lower price point sells. I think you can buy the latest Jeanneau 54 for about the same, if not less, than my 2004 54DS sold for new. Different boats.

High end stuff is still coming out with teak decks, albeit, not universally.
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post #24 of 35 Old 07-22-2019
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Re: 40 yr old teak decks

I'm chartering several boats in September. One of them is a 44' Jeanneau from 2014 and has teak decks.

I would note two things about that. 1) It's definitely unusual. 2) The owner is not local and pays to have the boat professionally maintained.



EDIT: 3) It looks damned sharp.
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post #25 of 35 Old 07-22-2019
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Re: 40 yr old teak decks

I'm sure cost is a factor, but I think there's more to the decline in teak decks than just that. It's an outdated, inferior material to many minds, and there's a definite trend toward simple and functional. I'm guessing that putting two identical boats side by side, same cost, one with teak decks and the other with synthetic or glass, the majority will choose the latter, maybe by a very wide margin.
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post #26 of 35 Old 07-22-2019
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Re: 40 yr old teak decks

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Originally Posted by krisscross View Post
I think your estimate of the cost to remove and glass over the deck is very much on the low side. Some teak decks can be very hard to remove due to strong adhesive, broken screws and so on. And the level of detail required to re surface the decks can surprise you. I recently fixed teak cap and rub rails on Island Packet 35 and it gave me a sobering view of teak decks in general. Not a deal breaker IMO but a serious cost factor. I would tentatively double your estimate.
Double it - at least - for fiberglass decks.

Increase by an order of magnitude to replace the teak deck.

I, myself, personally intend to continue being outspoken and opinionated, intolerant of all fanatics, fools and ignoramuses, deeply suspicious of all those who have "found the answer" and on my bad days, downright rude.
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post #27 of 35 Old 07-22-2019 Thread Starter
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Double it - at least - for fiberglass decks.

Increase by an order of magnitude to replace the teak deck.
I wouldnt be having the work done in the US. Here in Guatemala the daily rate for labor is $13. That's for 8 hours. So double that, let's say $25 per day. Hire four people. So $100 a day; I dont see that taking longer than two weeks to have the decks up. Sure lots of other work to do. As i said i have a friend, who also is a marine engineer, that had his Baba 40 done here for $7k. He was very happy with the job done.
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post #28 of 35 Old 07-22-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: 40 yr old teak decks

So one thing I'm doing is comparing value with apples to apples in mind. I've seen a Pearson 424 sloop. Nearly an identical layout. No teak decks, just toe rail, cockpit combing. It's been sailing the Caribbean for the last 4 years so its outfitted for cruising. Solar, generator, refrigeration, radar, davits, watermaker, autopilot. All the bells and whistles. Asking $56k.

The Bob Perry boat has a higher build quality than the Pearson, it's faster. Generally selling for a higher price point. Asking prices around $120k. Its a striking boat with the teak decks and it has a black hull. Seems like these two things make it harder to sell. Not outfitted for cruising at all. Doesn't even have refrigeration. Good things are its repowered but with a Volvo, rigging and electronics are 5 years old. Asking price is $65k. Seller is flexible on price since it will need to be outfitted. I've seen a 4 year old survey and it is positive overall.

Really the only downer about the Pearson is that I already own one, a 367. Feels like I'd be moving from a Toyota carolla up to a Camry. Lol
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post #29 of 35 Old 07-23-2019
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Re: 40 yr old teak decks

One other consideration is the hull color.

2 of the 5 we owned were awl gripped in dark colors. Wow, I love the way they look. IMHO, dark hulls are beautiful. Again, that esthetic vs. practicality equation.

But I sail in New England and Canada. I need heat more often than air conditioning.

If my plan was to go south, I'd think hard about dark colors.

YMMV as your heat tolerance.
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post #30 of 35 Old 07-23-2019
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Re: 40 yr old teak decks

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Originally Posted by capecodda View Post
....2 of the 5 we owned were awl gripped in dark colors. Wow, I love the way they look. IMHO, dark hulls are beautiful. Again, that esthetic vs. practicality equation. ......
This is a very good analogy. Dark hulls are only aesthetic and serve no practical purpose in the utility of the boat. At least teak decks do have some advantages, even if overwhelmingly aesthetic and pricey.

With a painted hull, you have to be all that more diligent in maintenance, or you'll be repainting sooner than you like. Once painted, always painted. No turning back. BTW, I think its much more difficult to return to non-skid, from teak, than many imagine.

In both cases, however, there may be a real psychological benefit. As they say, a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down. All boats, that is ALL boats, will require some heartbreaking, frustrating expenses and/or work. It's important that one can sit back, from time to time, see the result and really feel it is worth it. Aesthetics can do this for some people.


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