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LLCoolDave 07-19-2019 03:35 PM

40 yr old teak decks
 
I always told myself I'd never consider a boat with teak decks. Now a boat has come on the market I'm interested in. It's nearing 40 years old, a Bob Perry design, 45ish ft LOA. Its priced well below market value. It looks to be well maintained and the owner says the decks have no leaks. Being that I'm 2000 miles away it would probably cost me $3,000 to see it; haul out, survey, flight, hotel, car rental, etc.

Even if the teak is at the end of its life it would leave me enough money to sail it to Mexico (boat is on the California coast) where I could have the teak replaced or simply removed and fiberglassed over for a reasonable price. Let's say $10k US

So my question is would the teak decks make this an automatic no or would you consider it?

MikeOReilly 07-19-2019 03:47 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
As someone who owns a 40-year-old teak decked boat I would not make this an automatic no. BUT, I would not necessarily take the sellers word for it. If these are original decks it would be something approaching a miracle if they had zero problems.

But if this a well designed and well built boat, a leak is not the end of the world. It just has to be dealt with.

krisscross 07-19-2019 05:56 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
I think your estimate of the cost to remove and glass over the deck is very much on the low side. Some teak decks can be very hard to remove due to strong adhesive, broken screws and so on. And the level of detail required to re surface the decks can surprise you. I recently fixed teak cap and rub rails on Island Packet 35 and it gave me a sobering view of teak decks in general. Not a deal breaker IMO but a serious cost factor. I would tentatively double your estimate.

LLCoolDave 07-19-2019 06:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by krisscross (Post 2051615878)
I think your estimate of the cost to remove and glass over the deck is very much on the low side. Some teak decks can be very hard to remove due to strong adhesive, broken screws and so on. And the level of detail required to re surface the decks can surprise you. I recently fixed teak cap and rub rails on Island Packet 35 and it gave me a sobering view of teak decks in general. Not a deal breaker IMO but a serious cost factor. I would tentatively double your estimate.

Thanks for the replies so far. So I have a friend with a Baba 40 and he had his teak taken off and decks fiberglassed for $7k. That was in Rio Dulce, Guatemala. He was very happy with the work. That's what I'm basing my estimate on. You could very well be right though.

Of course the common saying for any boat project is double the budget and triple the time.

krisscross 07-19-2019 09:46 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by LLCoolDave (Post 2051615886)
So I have a friend with a Baba 40 and he had his teak taken off and decks fiberglassed for $7k. That was in Rio Dulce, Guatemala. He was very happy with the work. That's what I'm basing my estimate on. You could very well be right though.

Of course the common saying for any boat project is double the budget and triple the time.

Sometimes you get lucky but itís hard to count on that. Best approach would be to get an actual quote from a local company. Which of course we know that can be hard to get. But you definitely have a point of reference.

Yorksailor 07-20-2019 04:26 AM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
In 15 years of cruising, I have seen several boats with old, failing teak decks and I have seen the disasters that can lurk beneath the teak due to 20-30 years of leaks:

Rotted deck cores, plywood or balsa,
Chainplates that crumble because of crevice corrosion,
Internal bulkheads, that support chainplates, rotted out.

Keeping a mast vertical when a chainplate goes and you are out in a storm can be challenging.

Usually, there is a reason that a boat is priced well below market!

Good luck, you might need it! The only way to know is to go and see!

Minnewaska 07-20-2019 06:58 AM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
I love teak decks, if it werenít for the cost and maintenance. :)

There are love them and hate them folks out there. Not unlike an inground pool. Something to consider is whether any of those boats were made without teak decks. If not, yours could look bastardized.

Replacing with non-skid is no easy endeavor. Removing all the glue, caulking, screws and ultimately refinishing the glass to be smooth is time consuming. Iíve seen a poor job of this and it really looks bad.

If you had to replace, Iíd consider Teak Deck Systems. You send a pattern, they send you a deck. But thereís still way more to it.

svinshallah 07-20-2019 11:01 AM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
The OP didnít mention the brand of the boat. Iíve got a 1982 Norseman 447 with teak decks. The deck is arriving to the point where something serious is going to be required. In terms of deck leaks, the only ones after 20 years of ownership have been around the chain plates where the original installers left the core open.

Getting rid of the teak decks is a bigger job than it looks like. I just ripped up the teak on the seat area of the cockpit. It was a very small area, no more than 7í x 8í outside dimensions with a seat maybe 16Ē wide. I could do it all sitting down, not kneeling. It took two days to get all the old teak off with a circular saw and a big chisel. Another day to get out all the screws. Another day to drill out all the screw holes and fill with epoxy. Another two days to sand, smooth and finish with gel coat.

Thatís just the cockpit seat, a small area of maybe 30 square feet with excellent access and easy working conditions.

To do the same thing on the actual deck would first involve taking off all the overhead panels in the cabin, which is a big, inconvenient job. Then you remove everything thatís set down on the deck: cleats, winches, tracks, windlass, etc. Each of those can be a challenge because in my case then weíre all attached to the deck before any of the interior was installed. So often the nuts and any backing plates are now blocked with bulkhead, electrical wiring, etc. I could imagine at least a weeks work just getting all the liners down. Youíd have to label them and get them all off the boat to have any space to work.

Once everything is off the deck, youíll have to get all of the teak removed while youíre on you knees. Then drilling, filling and sanding all the holes in the entire deck. I did this once on a 41í boat and stopped counting at 4000 holes. This assumes you had nothing else like a leak somewhere to fix.

Then you need to figure out what youíre going to put back down. Will you use the old stanchion bases? Are all the fittings, tracks, blocks, etc. still usable? Should you reengineer the backing plates.

Then you have to refinish the deck. Painting with anti skid is probably the cheapest way, but takes a lot of labor to sand and mask. A synthetic surface is probably easier but costs maybe $30/square foot before installation.

Then you reinstall everything on the deck.

Then you reinstall all the interior panels.

If you can get that done for $10k, Iíd like to know where.

chall03 07-21-2019 02:40 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
We came very close to buying a Peterson 46 with the original teak decks.

I was pretty paranoid and went to the effort of bringing a good friend who is an experienced shipwright along with me and doing a thorough assessment of the state of the decks. Bottomline they weren't leaking and while cosmetically they weren't an amazing asset to the boat, they were still alright. There is I guess though that thought that one day, some day, sooner than later you do have to do something about them.

However aren't boats in general just basically all made up of several bits that are leaking, failing, corroding ticking timebombs? I guess Teak Decks are just one more thing and many folks don't wanna bother.

So why didn't we buy the Peterson? Turns out while I was being paranoid and pondering my offer, a guy came along and offered the seller 10k less than I would of and bought the boat out from under me. He has replaced a couple of teak plugs and went sailing.

So no for me not a deal breaker. Go into it with your eyes open and have a plan. It sounds like you are and you do. Best of luck.

SanderO 07-21-2019 08:39 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
teak decks can and do leak when they age... and a new laid teak deck is very spendy.

overbored 07-21-2019 09:01 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
I don't understand why anyone would buy a boat that has systems that need to be maintained that have no real reason for being on the boat. Teak decks on a modern day fiberglass boat are a waste of time and money. I have sailed on boats with and without teak decks and the only thing that i got from a Teak deck that I did not get from a fiberglass deck was Splinters and burnt feet.

MikeOReilly 07-22-2019 07:13 AM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by overbored (Post 2051616172)
I don't understand why anyone would buy a boat that has systems that need to be maintained that have no real reason for being on the boat. Teak decks on a modern day fiberglass boat are a waste of time and money. I have sailed on boats with and without teak decks and the only thing that i got from a Teak deck that I did not get from a fiberglass deck was Splinters and burnt feet.

WellÖ there really is no reason to own a sailboat at all ;). It's pretty much the slowest, and most expensive way, to go anywhere. It certainly makes no rational sense to own one.

Teak makes an excellent non-skid in all sea conditions. It is warm and comfortable on the feet. It is aesthetically beautiful. Itís really not that hard to maintain ó certainly no harder than many other boat systems.

If hard cold functionality really were the criteria by which we made decisions about boating, well, I think none of us would bother to own a sailboat ;).

SanderO 07-22-2019 08:37 AM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MikeOReilly (Post 2051616198)
....
Teak makes an excellent non-skid in all sea conditions. It is warm and comfortable on the feet. It is aesthetically beautiful. Itís really not that hard to maintain ó certainly no harder than many other boat systems.

You shouldn't compare teak laid decks to other systems re maintenance. But it does take more time to maintain it than textured gelcoat or perhaps Treadmaster. Because it is screwed down is can lead to leaks. I don't know how long a well maintained teak decks will last before they need serious attention. My textured gelcoat surface is as good as it was when new 35 years on. My sense is teak takes more time to keep looking good than non skid gelcoat.

Teak certainly is attractive and non skid. I would be concerned with very old teak decks... but all things being equal it needed be a deal breaker.

overbored 07-22-2019 12:25 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MikeOReilly (Post 2051616198)
Well… there really is no reason to own a sailboat at all ;). It's pretty much the slowest, and most expensive way, to go anywhere. It certainly makes no rational sense to own one.

Teak makes an excellent non-skid in all sea conditions. It is warm and comfortable on the feet. It is aesthetically beautiful. It’s really not that hard to maintain — certainly no harder than many other boat systems.

If hard cold functionality really were the criteria by which we made decisions about boating, well, I think none of us would bother to own a sailboat ;).

there are lots of reasons to own a sailboat, my one reason is enjoying life by going sailing. and i sail a slow sailboat not to get anywhere but to spend more time on a boat on the sea. it makes since to own one because if you don't it is hard to go sailing where and when you want. i do believe a power boat with twin diesels is a bit more expensive way to go somewhere

teak is very hot on your bare feet and splinters are a sure thing, teak never looks good unless it is varnished and requires several more hours of maintenance each year. and it is not will it leak it is going to leak because putting a million screws through a fiberglass deck is just a very bad idea.

it seems that you stated that there is no good reason to own a sail boat and the said there are lots of reasons to own one so which is it?
I know the answer, I don't have teak decks so I have more time to enjoy sailing and don't have to worry about when I will have to fix the leaking deck
if you enjoy having teak decks then fine you are the one that is paying for them in time and money.

capecodda 07-22-2019 12:52 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
I haven't met a boat owner who's honest with me or who hasn't taken up residence in some silted in harbor (in which case they have cheap housing, not really a boat), who doesn't care about what their boat looks like.

Now beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but IMHO teak decks are pretty darn attractive. They are also an excellent non-skid surface. Boat 4 of 5 had teak decks. I never got splinters, but my wallet sprang a definite leak :).

As they get older, the teak itself wears and the caulking between the boards starts to stand up higher than the boards. Then you can re-caulk, and maybe sand it a bit, till you get to the point that the bungs are gone and you are looking at the screws. Of course the potential leak points are numerous. I've seen newer construction where the teak is glued down which avoids the million screw holes. I've also watched as a board yard tried to remove that teak on a large yacht, not pretty or cheap.

IMHO, we all operate at different points when it comes to evaluating esthetics vs. maintenance cost/time. You can't say you spend zero time or dollars on esthetics, because I think for most of this that's a lie. Each of us pick an operating point we can live with and pay with either time or money.

IMHO, I would not buy a teak decked boat to save money, because the purchase price was low. Buying the is cheap part. Maintenance is where you pay. I would only buy one if I loved teak decks so much, I didn't care what the maintenance cost would be.

There's lots of boats out there, and the cost of curing a problem like old teak decks in time or money is not cheap.

Minnewaska 07-22-2019 01:47 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by overbored (Post 2051616258)
.....teak is very hot on your bare feet and splinters are a sure thing, teak never looks good unless it is varnished and requires several more hours of maintenance each year. and it is not will it leak it is going to leak because putting a million screws through a fiberglass deck is just a very bad idea.

Seems you might be describing these attributes from rumor. Yes, teak can get hot, but not instantly. If it's wet, it's never hot and yet still holds one's foot well. Better than many non-skid patterns. There are aggressive non-skid patterns or textures that always hold well. However, by definition, they are aggressive on your foot. Teak does have it's advantages.

No one ever varnishes a teak deck. That wouldn't make any sense, it would get slippery and lose all the properties one is looking for. Varnish is for trim, handholds and tables. Some will oil the decks, but that attracts dirt. Others will seal them with something like Semco, but it looks terrible, IMO.

As for routine maintenance, I let mine weather grey. A scrub with salt water weekly is a good idea. TDS makes a new one part Eco-cleaner that is amazing. It's bio-degradeable and you practically just lay it on, scrub lightly with a scotchbrite and rinse off. Done.

Many decks are glued down, but there are still some screw holes from the bracing that holds it in place, while waiting for the glue to cure. These are supposed to be filled. Often, they are not. In my case, I keep finding the actual screws, buried under the caulking.

Teak decks would not be a great idea, if you were in tropical climates 12 months out of the year. They would wear much more quickly and replacement is breathtakingly expensive.

MikeOReilly 07-22-2019 02:11 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by overbored (Post 2051616258)
there are lots of reasons to own a sailboat, my one reason is enjoying life by going sailing. and i sail a slow sailboat not to get anywhere but to spend more time on a boat on the sea. it makes since to own one because if you don't it is hard to go sailing where and when you want. i do believe a power boat with twin diesels is a bit more expensive way to go somewhere

teak is very hot on your bare feet and splinters are a sure thing, teak never looks good unless it is varnished and requires several more hours of maintenance each year. and it is not will it leak it is going to leak because putting a million screws through a fiberglass deck is just a very bad idea.

it seems that you stated that there is no good reason to own a sail boat and the said there are lots of reasons to own one so which is it?
I know the answer, I don't have teak decks so I have more time to enjoy sailing and don't have to worry about when I will have to fix the leaking deck
if you enjoy having teak decks then fine you are the one that is paying for them in time and money.

Geeze buddy, you come across as someone who needs to spend more time sailing. Chill out. My obviously too-subtle a point was that owning a sailboat is not a choice made through logic alone. It’s an emotional decision driven by aesthetics and personal taste. I find modern tupperware boats to be pretty ugly, and lacking any real character, but that’s my personal taste.

What I said was that if logic is the only driver, then you’re never going to justify owning a boat. You say the reason to own a sailboat is to go sailing, so by that rather circular logic, the reason to own a teak decked boat is because one likes teak under foot.

Teak decks should not be varnished. The reason teak is used, aside from their beauty, is because the natural oils keeps them healthy and beautiful. I don’t get splinters in my feet. Nor do I find it particularly hot. But I sail more northerly waters, so perhaps I would way down south.

The issues with screwed in decks are very serious, and no one should buy an old “leaky teaky” without serious survey research, and going in ‘eyes wide open’ as to the potential issues. The OP’s question was should this be a deal breaker. I, and some others who appear to have actual experience living with these decks, advise that it isn’t necessarily a deal breaker (unless you just don’t like them, as you clearly don’t).

Minnewaska 07-22-2019 02:17 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by overbored (Post 2051616258)
....splinters are a sure thing....

Forgot to mention. I've never received a splinter from my own or anyone else's teak decks. This includes decks that are well past their prime, like my current decks. I suppose one could have exposed splinters, but a deck that bad would be really bad. It's very uncommon and not a sure thing.

overbored 07-22-2019 02:39 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Minnewaska (Post 2051616270)
Seems you might be describing these attributes from rumor. Yes, teak can get hot, but not instantly. If it's wet, it's never hot and yet still holds one's foot well. Better than many non-skid patterns. There are aggressive non-skid patterns or textures that always hold well. However, by definition, they are aggressive on your foot. Teak does have it's advantages.

No one ever varnishes a teak deck. That wouldn't make any sense, it would get slippery and lose all the properties one is looking for. Varnish is for trim, handholds and tables. Some will oil the decks, but that attracts dirt. Others will seal them with something like Semco, but it looks terrible, IMO.

As for routine maintenance, I let mine weather grey. A scrub with salt water weekly is a good idea. TDS makes a new one part Eco-cleaner that is amazing. It's bio-degradeable and you practically just lay it on, scrub lightly with a scotchbrite and rinse off. Done.

Many decks are glued down, but there are still some screw holes from the bracing that holds it in place, while waiting for the glue to cure. These are supposed to be filled. Often, they are not. In my case, I keep finding the actual screws, buried under the caulking.

Teak decks would not be a great idea, if you were in tropical climates 12 months out of the year. They would wear much more quickly and replacement is breathtakingly expensive.

not from rumor but from 65 years of experience of building, installing, using and sailing on deck decks. when I was 6 years old I had a all varnished teak wooden 12' sloop made by my father. my family had a real chinese junk with teak decks when I was 18 , in fact the whole boat was teak. My father owned a cabinet shop that did boat work and he was the teak guy. I know a little bit about teak. my current boat has teak toe rail and cockpit seats that are glued on not screwed, not one screw. the one thing I do not like about the current boat is the teak. I do like teak when varnished and did not say anything about varnish on a teak deck (I did have a wooden power boat that had varnished teak decks) simply said it does not look good to me unless it is varnished as in the interior. oiled teak is good on furniture but varnished looks best on the teak for a boat.

yes the scrub with salt water is good but who wants to do that weekly.
the older I get the less i want to have to spend time maintaining the boat and the more I want to sail it
done my time on several leaky teakys

overbored 07-22-2019 02:47 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Minnewaska (Post 2051616280)
Forgot to mention. I've never received a splinter from my own or anyone else's teak decks. This includes decks that are well past their prime, like my current decks. I suppose one could have exposed splinters, but a deck that bad would be really bad. It's very uncommon and not a sure thing.

Sail on them long enough and and it will and does happen. never happened to me but have seen some nasty ones. we would almost never go bare foot on the teak because when it is bare foot weather the deck is to hot to stand on when not wet

Minnewaska 07-22-2019 02:51 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by overbored (Post 2051616286)
...yes the scrub with salt water is good but who wants to do that weekly....

I'd wash the non-skid weekly too, so I don't see the difference.

I understand you're not a fan of teak decks, many aren't. That's fine. However, I think you've overstated your case.

caberg 07-22-2019 03:54 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
There must be a reason why very few boats are being built with teak decks today. It's sort of like people arguing that the Atomic A4 had good qualities. Well, yea, if they were so great why did builders stop putting them in sailboats in the 1980s? For whatever reason, people don't want gas auxiliary engines (no matter how much quieter and smoother the A4 enthusiasts claim they are) and people don't want teak decks. Times change. If you don't care about resale some day, and are up for the challenge of maintaining and probably replacing the old teak decks, have at it. I think teak decks look and feel great, but they don't make sense on a modern cruising sailboat.

Minnewaska 07-22-2019 05:00 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Ever since the great recession, it seems the production manufacturers that survived, have engineered cost out of the product. That includes removing virtually all real teak, not just the side decks. Lower price point sells. I think you can buy the latest Jeanneau 54 for about the same, if not less, than my 2004 54DS sold for new. Different boats.

High end stuff is still coming out with teak decks, albeit, not universally.

Minnesail 07-22-2019 05:23 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
I'm chartering several boats in September. One of them is a 44' Jeanneau from 2014 and has teak decks.

I would note two things about that. 1) It's definitely unusual. 2) The owner is not local and pays to have the boat professionally maintained.



EDIT: 3) It looks damned sharp.

caberg 07-22-2019 05:27 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
I'm sure cost is a factor, but I think there's more to the decline in teak decks than just that. It's an outdated, inferior material to many minds, and there's a definite trend toward simple and functional. I'm guessing that putting two identical boats side by side, same cost, one with teak decks and the other with synthetic or glass, the majority will choose the latter, maybe by a very wide margin.

SloopJonB 07-22-2019 05:49 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by krisscross (Post 2051615878)
I think your estimate of the cost to remove and glass over the deck is very much on the low side. Some teak decks can be very hard to remove due to strong adhesive, broken screws and so on. And the level of detail required to re surface the decks can surprise you. I recently fixed teak cap and rub rails on Island Packet 35 and it gave me a sobering view of teak decks in general. Not a deal breaker IMO but a serious cost factor. I would tentatively double your estimate.

Double it - at least - for fiberglass decks.

Increase by an order of magnitude to replace the teak deck.

LLCoolDave 07-22-2019 07:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SloopJonB (Post 2051616334)
Double it - at least - for fiberglass decks.

Increase by an order of magnitude to replace the teak deck.

I wouldnt be having the work done in the US. Here in Guatemala the daily rate for labor is $13. That's for 8 hours. So double that, let's say $25 per day. Hire four people. So $100 a day; I dont see that taking longer than two weeks to have the decks up. Sure lots of other work to do. As i said i have a friend, who also is a marine engineer, that had his Baba 40 done here for $7k. He was very happy with the job done.

LLCoolDave 07-22-2019 10:23 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
So one thing I'm doing is comparing value with apples to apples in mind. I've seen a Pearson 424 sloop. Nearly an identical layout. No teak decks, just toe rail, cockpit combing. It's been sailing the Caribbean for the last 4 years so its outfitted for cruising. Solar, generator, refrigeration, radar, davits, watermaker, autopilot. All the bells and whistles. Asking $56k.

The Bob Perry boat has a higher build quality than the Pearson, it's faster. Generally selling for a higher price point. Asking prices around $120k. Its a striking boat with the teak decks and it has a black hull. Seems like these two things make it harder to sell. Not outfitted for cruising at all. Doesn't even have refrigeration. Good things are its repowered but with a Volvo, rigging and electronics are 5 years old. Asking price is $65k. Seller is flexible on price since it will need to be outfitted. I've seen a 4 year old survey and it is positive overall.

Really the only downer about the Pearson is that I already own one, a 367. Feels like I'd be moving from a Toyota carolla up to a Camry. Lol

capecodda 07-23-2019 05:13 AM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
One other consideration is the hull color.

2 of the 5 we owned were awl gripped in dark colors. Wow, I love the way they look. IMHO, dark hulls are beautiful. Again, that esthetic vs. practicality equation.

But I sail in New England and Canada. I need heat more often than air conditioning.

If my plan was to go south, I'd think hard about dark colors.

YMMV as your heat tolerance.

Minnewaska 07-23-2019 06:29 AM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by capecodda (Post 2051616392)
....2 of the 5 we owned were awl gripped in dark colors. Wow, I love the way they look. IMHO, dark hulls are beautiful. Again, that esthetic vs. practicality equation. ......

This is a very good analogy. Dark hulls are only aesthetic and serve no practical purpose in the utility of the boat. At least teak decks do have some advantages, even if overwhelmingly aesthetic and pricey.

With a painted hull, you have to be all that more diligent in maintenance, or you'll be repainting sooner than you like. Once painted, always painted. No turning back. BTW, I think its much more difficult to return to non-skid, from teak, than many imagine.

In both cases, however, there may be a real psychological benefit. As they say, a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down. All boats, that is ALL boats, will require some heartbreaking, frustrating expenses and/or work. It's important that one can sit back, from time to time, see the result and really feel it is worth it. Aesthetics can do this for some people.

Minnewaska 07-23-2019 06:30 AM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by caberg (Post 2051616330)
I'm sure cost is a factor, but I think there's more to the decline in teak decks than just that. It's an outdated, inferior material to many minds, and there's a definite trend toward simple and functional. I'm guessing that putting two identical boats side by side, same cost, one with teak decks and the other with synthetic or glass, the majority will choose the latter, maybe by a very wide margin.

I can't say where the majority would come down, but it's true that teak decks are not for everyone. Since it's cheaper not to have them, it stands to reason that would be more popular. Just like an inground pool, they cost more and for some people are a deterrent, while for others an attraction.

Another teak dynamic is that it was being harvested unsustainably and has become harder and even more expensive to source now. The production manufacturers needed so much, it became impractical. I think France, for example, even banned several sources for environmental and social reasons.

Minnewaska 07-23-2019 06:31 AM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by LLCoolDave (Post 2051616370)
.....I've seen a 4 year old survey and it is positive overall......l

Totally irrelevant, I wouldn't consider a survey that was 6 months old to be worth the paper it was written on. Not all surveys are done with your same interest either. Some are just being done to assess a value and safe condition for an insurance company, other only to justify a value to finance. Folks shop their surveyor for these reasons. Most don't pay to have one get into the nitty gritty, but certainly should.

MikeOReilly 07-23-2019 07:40 AM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by LLCoolDave (Post 2051616370)
So one thing I'm doing is comparing value with apples to apples in mind. I've seen a Pearson 424 sloop. Nearly an identical layout. No teak decks, just toe rail, cockpit combing. It's been sailing the Caribbean for the last 4 years so its outfitted for cruising. Solar, generator, refrigeration, radar, davits, watermaker, autopilot. All the bells and whistles. Asking $56k.

The Bob Perry boat has a higher build quality than the Pearson, it's faster. Generally selling for a higher price point. Asking prices around $120k. Its a striking boat with the teak decks and it has a black hull. Seems like these two things make it harder to sell. Not outfitted for cruising at all. Doesn't even have refrigeration. Good things are its repowered but with a Volvo, rigging and electronics are 5 years old. Asking price is $65k. Seller is flexible on price since it will need to be outfitted. I've seen a 4 year old survey and it is positive overall.

Really the only downer about the Pearson is that I already own one, a 367. Feels like I'd be moving from a Toyota carolla up to a Camry. Lol

Sounds like a tough call, and I have no where near the necessary info to make an informed decision. Nor can tell which one really makes your heart sing, which to my mind IS an important factor when buying a boat.

IF the teak decks are in good shape ó and Iíd seriously NOT trust the seller on this one ó then the recent repowering and re-rigging is worth serious plusses. Not sure what boat you are looking at, but if it is significantly better designed and built vs the Pearson (which are known as good boats), then that also adds weight on that side of the column.

I discount most electronics; the basics are relatively cheap. Radar can be big, but where are you cruising? If the Caribbean, then my understanding is that radar is rarely needed. Refrigeration? Having just done the job itís not that expensive (boat buck or two) and not that hard to install in an existing ice box. Autopilot of some sort if essential, and that can be pricey. Not sure how the dark hull factors in. Iíve only ever owned light coloured ones.

Not sure how this all balances out in your calculations, but these are how I would balance what youíve said.

LLCoolDave 07-23-2019 04:32 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Of course I've been reading everything I can on teak decks and dark hulls. This is an Airex cored hull which adds a good deal of insulation. I dont think taking the boat to the tropics will make a big difference in cabin temp but one thing that's cropped up in my reading is dark colors on cored hulls can lead to delamination.

MikeOReilly 07-23-2019 04:48 PM

Re: 40 yr old teak decks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by LLCoolDave (Post 2051616576)
Of course I've been reading everything I can on teak decks and dark hulls. This is an Airex cored hull which adds a good deal of insulation. I dont think taking the boat to the tropics will make a big difference in cabin temp but one thing that's cropped up in my reading is dark colors on cored hulls can lead to delamination.

Interesting. My Rafiki has an Airex cored hull. Itís down to a couple of feet above the start of the keel encasement, so not 100%. This boat is definitely well insulated. Stays cool well into the heat of day, and stays warm well into the night. Also insulated against sound, so I sleep well.

Not sure if this is insulating character is due to the Airex, or simply because my hull is so damn thick anyway.


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